How Managers Make Unwanted Employees Go Away

Updated on December 16, 2017
FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway is an Industrial/Organizational Psychologist with applied experience in corporate human resources and consulting.

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When You're a Target on the Boss' Radar

Perhaps you've had personal conflicts with various co-workers or you've spoken your mind once too often. Maybe you're a negative nelly, perpetually late, resistant to change, struggling with job performance, or all of the above. You could also be the victim of dirty office politics (I cast no judgments here). Whatever it is, your boss just wants you gone—as in, "out of the picture."

If you get the sinking feeling that your manager is simply tired of dealing with you, then you need to know what will likely come your way before it smacks you right in the middle of your cubicle. I can help to clue you in.

2 Ways to Go: Make It Quick or Make It Painful

Having been an HR representative for two Fortune 500 companies, I can tell you on a practical level that there are two ways your boss can facilitate your exit.

  1. He (or she) can take the direct approach, firing you quickly and decisively. Examples include discharging you for violating a company rule, strategically eliminating your job, or firing you for poor performance.
  2. More often, however, a manager opts for the passive-aggressive approach, wherein you (the unwanted employee) unwittingly participate in your own termination. The manager will subtly make you feel so unwelcome that you eventually fire yourself by quitting or moving to a different department.

Either way, you lose your job. If you're among your boss' least favorite employees, consider that what you thought was managerial incompetence may actually be something else entirely! (Take a moment to let that sink in.)

Signs You Have a Sneaky Smart Manager

The task of managing others is difficult work. A good manager does the following:

  • sets reasonable goals and work objectives
  • motivates workers
  • measures an employee's progress against goals
  • communicates success and shortfalls
  • rewards accordingly
  • provides ongoing training and development
  • offers timely, fair, candid performance feedback
  • affords opportunity for improvement.1

In contrast, the sneaky smart manager is a lazy person who would rather short-circuit the performance management process than do the more challenging aspects of his (or her) job. Faced with a disliked or low-performing employee, he/she, instead, invests in strategies to get rid of the "problem" employee.

He/she is often poorly skilled at addressing subordinates' training and developmental needs or at managing altogether. Thus, it's easier for him/her to blame the employee than double down on managing.

Conflict and Consequence Avoidance

He/she is also too cowardly and ill-prepared to fire the employee directly. This would likely involve defending his/her decision to HR, company lawyers, upper management, and/or a government agency (i.e., should the employee file for unemployment or wrongful discharge).

The sneaky smart manager wants to save face and avoid conflict (and the inevitable consequences of managerial decisions) so s/he takes the passive-aggressive way out by attempting to make the employee miserable enough to quit. But this, too, has its risks—especially if the reason the employee is "unwanted" has anything to do with unlawful discrimination, retaliation, whistle-blowing, etc.

Constructive Discharge

An employee who feels they have been "forced" to quit may complain of constructive discharge, meaning it was not their free and voluntary choice to resign, but because the employer deliberately made working conditions so intolerable that any reasonable person would have felt obligated to make such a change.2 Constructive discharge is often challenging to prove, however.

Important Note: If you have questions about your particular situation, always consult an attorney in your jurisdiction—preferably before you quit.

Reader Poll

Have you ever gotten on your manager's "bad side" and become his or her "unwanted" employee?

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Are You Being Targeted?

Below are 12 ways that sneaky smart managers typically use to target unwanted employees. They cleverly wear down disliked and low-performing employees until they shout "mercy" with a resignation letter. Chances are, if you truly are an unwanted employee, then you'll recognize more than a few techniques.

As you review the list, concentrate on the overall pattern of how you and your boss interact. Then, compare your experience with that of co-workers. If the treatment is substantially different, that's a big clue about your future.

12 Methods Used to Get Rid of Employees

Strategy 1: Death by Overwork

Do all the assignments seem to land on your desk while teammates kick back and watch funny YouTube videos?

The sneaky manager can turn up the heat using disproportionately high workloads. Then, he'll add tight or unreasonable deadlines. These techniques are meant to increase your stress levels. Even if you adjust to the high-octane work demands, you'll pay a hefty price in terms of mental, emotional, and physical exhaustion.

Strategy 2: Resource Limitation

Leave it to the sneaky manager to discreetly limit your resources, therefore, making it harder for you to do your job efficiently. If you speak up, he tries to convince you that it's really not an objective problem. You're just overreacting (probably from being overworked). He urges you to "get creative" or "do the best with what you have" because his "hands are tied."

Strategy 3: "Go Solve It Yourself"

In this innovative lead-from-behind strategy, you ask your boss for help with a significant problem. However, the sneaky boss shoves it back on you by saying that a good employee does not present problems to the boss. The good employee presents solutions. (Nice deflection!)

While that sounds cute, managers are supposed to provide problem-solving assistance when an employee is stumped. Instead, the sneaky boss instructs you to generate x number of solutions to your problem, often on-the-spot. Usually, none of the solutions is sufficient. That's why you sought assistance from the manager in the first place! It feels like a dog chasing its own tail.

Strategy 4: Assigning Tasks That Don't Fit the Employee's Competency Level

The sneaky boss opts for one of two extremes. He assigns either

  • unchallenging tasks that are substantially below your skill level or
  • tasks that are far too difficult and, thus, guarantee failure.

While everyone must perform some mundane tasks as a part of their job, getting stuck with too many can be boring, frustrating, and growth-suffocating. And, unless you have appropriate guidance and support, tasks that are too challenging can lead to anger and embarrassing public failure.

Strategy 5: Perpetual Distraction

When the sneaky boss is with the unwanted employee, he mentally checks out by texting, answering phone calls, or avoiding eye contact. He tries to rush the conversation along by saying things like, "Yep, yep, yep." And, if he consistently cannot bother to turn your way when you're trying to talk to him, then he's giving you the proverbial cold shoulder.

Strategy 6: Clamming up on Small Talk

Do you feel like you're in a social desert?

Having made it clear that your purpose for being there is to work, the sneaky manager eliminates all unnecessary conversation. Chit-chat is gone. He doesn't ask you friendly questions about your vacation or weekend, how your family is, etc. He doesn't care.

All of that non-work-related social interaction would just make you seem more like a person to him, and that would be ... well, awkward. Co-workers take note and they may stop engaging with you, too.

Cold Shoulder Got You Down?

As an unwanted employee, you may notice that your sneaky manager communicates with you primarily through email and "accidentally" excludes you.  To him, you're as good as gone.
As an unwanted employee, you may notice that your sneaky manager communicates with you primarily through email and "accidentally" excludes you. To him, you're as good as gone. | Source

Strategy 7: Formalizing Communication Channels

Claiming he's extraordinarily busy, the sneaky manager is personally inaccessible — at least to you, anyway. You must communicate with him primarily via email rather than through quick phone calls or by dropping by his office (as his door is always shut).

You may notice, too, that you have been excluded from certain meetings and have been left off key emails. If you inquire, he'll provide a reasonable rationale (e.g., an oversight).

Strategy 8: Stifling Creativity With Bureaucracy

Don't you go getting all creative! The sneaky boss is an enthusiasm and creativity killer. His favorite mantras include:

  • "We don't do it that way."
  • "We've tried that before, and it was a disaster."
  • "We don't have time for that."
  • "There's no way the ___ department would approve that."

Strategy 9: Limiting Rewards and Recognition

Everyone makes mistakes, but the sneaky smart boss ensures that everyone knows about yours. Be prepared for criticism in front of an audience. He may also email you criticism in lieu of a conversation or as a recap of a tongue-lashing you had 20 minutes ago. That's called "papering the file," and it's a bad sign.

On the flip side, when you make a praiseworthy contribution, don't expect the sneaky manager to high-five you. He'll instead take credit for your work by saving your creative ideas and presenting them as his own. He'll also give accolades to someone else or downplay your achievement altogether. That's just how it works.

Do You Give Up Yet?

How much of this can you tolerate before you move on to another job?
How much of this can you tolerate before you move on to another job? | Source

Strategy 10: Aggression by Micromanagement

Micromanagers have serious control and trust issues, thus, they monitor and regulate the minutiae of their subordinate's job. Micromanagement is mismanagement, and, unfortunately, the tendency becomes especially brutal when there is an employee on the micromanager's radar.

Such bosses are often sneaky smart, and they typically engage in the following behaviors that drive their employees crazy:

  • requesting constant revisions
  • issuing frequent report requests
  • asking for documentation rather than trusting your word
  • making sure you know you're being watched

Do you feel anxious yet?

Strategy 11: Performance Management by the Book

When you're on the sneaky manager's radar, be prepared to be performance managed closely. You'll hear "accountability" and "deliverables" constantly. Your punctuality and how you're spending your time become very important. Your mistakes are magnified and documented. Expect to be counseled on minor rule violations that might otherwise go unnoticed.

In case you decide not to quit, your performance review rapidly becomes Plan B.

Strategy 12: No Room for Advancement

There's no better motivation buster than learning you work in a career graveyard. The sneaky manager bypasses you for promotions but always has "reasons." He informs you that there's no way you can realistically meet your career goals, and you have limited opportunities to learn new things. Read between the lines: he's inviting you to work elsewhere. What's it going to take?

Consider whether there is any truth in your boss' feedback.  Could you be too comfortable in your current role?  Maybe you need a new career challenge elsewhere -- a fresh start perhaps?  Begin with a clean desk and a new pair of shoes.
Consider whether there is any truth in your boss' feedback. Could you be too comfortable in your current role? Maybe you need a new career challenge elsewhere -- a fresh start perhaps? Begin with a clean desk and a new pair of shoes. | Source

Tips: Stay Smart, Stay Strong

It's important to be realistic with yourself if you're a disliked or are a low-performing employee. Anticipate that a sneaky smart boss who has not managed you well may engage in some of these 12 strategies to get rid of you. As you prepare for your exit, keep these tips in mind:

  • Turbo charge your performance if it's an issue. Perceptions sometimes change!
  • Stay calm and avoid outbursts. You don't want to provide a legitimate reason for them to fire you. Also avoid emotional venting to coworkers. It'll get back to your boss, and he'll know his efforts are working.
  • Consider whether you want to complain to HR or upper management.
  • Read and understand any company policies that affect you.
  • Look for allies. They may be your support now and your references later.
  • Take care of yourself emotionally, mentally, and physically. Consult a counselor to talk through your options as you move forward.
  • Don't make rash decisions (e.g., quitting in anger).
  • Double down on your job search. Revise your resume and practice your interview skills. A lot has changed since you last looked for a job.

7 Points to Consider When Quitting Your Job

Issue
Description
Your Next Job
Do you have your next job lined up? It's easier to get another job if you're already employed.
Your Finances
How are your finances? Do you have a 6-8 month emergency fund? Quitting typically makes you ineligible for unemployment benefits. And once you hand in a resignation letter, all bets are probably off for severance.
The Resignation Letter
If you're going to file an unemployment or discrimination claim, that resignation letter will certainly be Exhibit A. Regardless, make it brief. You don't need to give specific reasons for moving on.
The Exit Interview
Typically, nothing useful comes out of exit interviews for the departing employee. Unless you are lodging a formal complaint, it's just water under a burned bridge.
Co-Workers
Anticipate negative reactions from co-workers, especially if team workload is high. Try to share the news with them personally. As much as you want to, don't gloat or bad mouth your boss or the company on the way out.
Equipping Yourself
Before turning in your resignation, obtain key information you'll need (e.g., examples of your work, copies of performance reviews, contact information for boss/co-workers).
Amount of Notice to Give
Two weeks' notice is a common business courtesy. Companies sometimes appreciate longer notices (e.g., 3-4 weeks).

Notes

1Wall Street Journal. (n.d.). What do Managers do? Retrieved August 8, 2014, from http://guides.wsj.com/management/developing-a-leadership-style/what-do-managers-do/.

2Duhaime, L. (n.d.). Constructive Discharge Legal Definition. Retrieved August 8, 2014, from http://www.duhaime.org/LegalDictionary/C/ConstructiveDischarge.aspx.

Questions & Answers

  • My manager tried to move me to a different department for 2 hours and I declined. He said if I didn't want to do it, I could go home and come back tomorrow and talk with the big boss. Can he do this?

    The quickest way to get disciplined, including losing your job, is to refuse a reasonable request from your manager. That's called insubordination, or disobedience of authority, and typically it's only excusable under extreme situations such as when a manager requests that you perform an unsafe or illegal act, for example.

    Working in another department for two hours doesn't seem that unreasonable on the face of it. Even when you're typically assigned to a given work area or department, sometimes business needs require that a manager reassign an employee for a short period of time, as it seems he tried to do here. You have to be a little flexible, right?

    The only real choice he had when you refused was to send you home for insubordination, although he probably should have clarified. Saying something like the following would have made the consequences super clear for you: "Are you refusing my management direction by not going to the X Department? Because if so, that's insubordination, and I'll have no choice but to send you home and have you come back tomorrow to talk with the big boss. Typically, insubordinate employees are fired. Do you want a minute to decide?" You could then have weighed your options. I'm betting you would have made a different choice.

    Just because he did not spell it out, however, doesn't mean you should not have known. Remember, we all report to someone.

  • Can the office manager in a shop fire you on the spot for making a mistake?

    Most employees in the United States work without an employment contract outlining reasons why they can be fired. You probably are one of these folks. Unless you're covered by an employment contract or collective bargaining agreement, you likely don't have specific terms that outline your employment and are employed at will.

    The concept of "employment at will" means that an employee can be fired for a good reason, bad reason, or no reason at all, including with no warning. This is what you seemed to face with your on-the-spot discharge for a mistake.

    There are several important exceptions to at-will employment:

    1) The key exception is employment contracts and collective bargaining agreements that outline terms and conditions of employment, including specific reasons why you can be discharged. In some states, employee handbooks/policy manuals or sections of employee handbooks/policy manuals are considered employment contracts. (Hint: Look to see if your employer has a progressive discipline policy in which the employer stipulates that it will discharge employees only for certain reasons, according to a given process.)

    2) The reason for at-will job dismissal cannot violate state or federal law, such as whistleblower or non-discrimination laws.

    3) Federal employees cannot be discharged for violations of the U.S. Constitution or the constitutions of the states in which they work.

    Start by asking yourself if you have an employment contract or policy manual? If not and you aren't subject to one of the other exceptions, the answer is unfortunately yes, the office manager can most likely fire you on-the-spot like they did.

    Sadly, this is one reason why people organize unions -- to do away with such arbitrary and capricious treatment. I'm sorry you received such poor treatment over a mistake. Don't make the assumption that you are ineligible for unemployment benefits. Here is an article that may help you move forward: http://hubpages.com/finding-job/12-Action-Steps-to...

  • If an employer nags you about body odor to get you to quit your job, and they succeed, is there any recourse?

    There are two related issues here. First, there was a job resignation that related to a person (you, I assume?) resigning their job under alleged duress from the company. Second, there is a smell and/or hygiene issue.

    When you voluntarily resign a job, typically a company will request some kind of resignation letter from you or at least a signed form so that it can later prove that the employee quit voluntarily, if needed. Only you know whether you submitted this type of documentation and/or at least made verbal statements to your management or coworkers about why you were leaving. You may or may not have also participated in an exit interview. If so, I hope you were honest that conditions had become intolerable (or you at least you didn't give statements that contradicted the real reason you left).

    At the heart of the matter is why you are alleged to be smelling poorly. You probably have some idea whether it's actually true or not based on others' reactions to you. Think of past scenarios and other settings. Has anyone else even hinted that you didn't smell good or is it just this employer?

    If you do smell poorly, do you have a medical condition that would explain this? Is the reason instead related to your cultural or religious practices that the employer was being insensitive to, or are there illegal biases against you such as race, national origin, religion, etc.?

    You indicate that your former employer nagged you to quit. I assume that there was a pattern of aggressive, escalating behavior towards you that resulted in you finally giving up and resigning. Before doing so, did you at least try to talk to someone in HR about it or complain about the behavior? I hope so.

    Unfortunately, it will likely be an uphill battle. You might want to start with immediately filing an unemployment claim with your state unemployment office disputing that you voluntarily quit.

© 2014 FlourishAnyway

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    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 days ago from USA

      Anwesha - I can't guarantee that people will like or accept my opinions. If he's this disturbed about it, he should have an open and honest conversation with his manager, but be aware that the feedback may be very similar. Good luck to you both in moving forward.

    • etobicokegirl profile image

      Anwesha 

      5 days ago from Toronto, Canada

      I think it’s unfair to suggest that anyone is spoiled or sullen without knowing if they were. I never suggested he didn’t work hard, wasn’t professional and wasn’t a team player. Being open about his internal struggle on this forum was an error on my part. Thank you for your advise but it doesn’t help me help him with a resolution.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      6 days ago from USA

      Anwesha - Since you're a manager yourself, then you understand that sometimes employees just need to be flexible and have a good attitude when they don't get what they want. This is especially so if it's a project rather than a permanent job change. Sometimes a company will have business needs that don't fit 100% what the employee wants for himself/herself personally, but it's important for the overall organization that the employee give their full ability and effort even if they don't like the temporary assignment. Your husband has missed an important opportunity to fulfill a key role, meet the needs of the company, demonstrate his adaptability, and even teach others chief knowledge and skills. It would have earned him additional credibility in the organization. Instead, he's acted spoiled and sullen. We can't all expect to be the leader all the time. He needs to support the team.

    • etobicokegirl profile image

      Anwesha 

      7 days ago from Toronto, Canada

      My husband was asked by his manager to switch from software development team lead to scrum master for 2 teams and my husband took on the role and did the certifications and was looking to move forward in his career. Then 6 months into it, he was asked by same manager to go back to software development as one of his teams had to be disintegrated for a bigger project that needed resources. Not only was he no longer going to be a scrum master, he was now assigned to a self managed team with an existing team lead. He felt demoted and soon the new team members started asking him how he felt now that he was no longer scrum master and he wasn’t invited to any meeting, when before, he was a key member required at many meetings. He has one on one’s with his manager which last all of 3 min where neither has any relevant conversation, small talk or updates. His team ignores him and he feels isolated. He used to be a very motivated and successful team lead before all this. He is depressed and anxious. He has been with the company 11 years and he is having a hard time finding work elsewhere so he can leave this negative environment. As a manager myself, I feel his manager has failed in every way to lead, motivate and mentor, which is what a people manager is supposed to do. How do I help address this, when I don’t work at his company?

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 weeks ago from USA

      Bill Loneing - Congratulations to you for wanting to further your education. Ultimately, however, it is the company's decision, consistent with their policies and business need. They have not only you to consider but also the rest of the workforce who might want a similar opportunity for such job flexibility.

      Take a look at their policies on training, tuition reimbursement, and personal leave. Then try to put a brief, one-paged proposal in writing regarding a trial period (e.g., one semester) in which you lay out how this would work exactly. Offer to formally check in with your boss and HR every month regarding how it's working for both parties. Be as specific as possible, and approach it very positively. You can often get more with a positive approach, emphasizing benefits for the company, than with frustration (although I'm certain you feel it, based on their indecisiveness). Hope that helps.

    • profile image

      Bill Loneing 

      3 weeks ago

      I want to go to school and its job related. The deal would only infringe 0n 3 hours of regular time I could easy makeup. I am getting flack and foot draging.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 weeks ago from USA

      Yen - I'm sorry this happened to him. It seems very peculiar that after 5 years of good reviews he's suddenly not a good fit for the company, as judged by this new manager. I would try to better understand WHY and HOW this person understands so well what is good for the company, being such a new employee. I'd also want specific examples of how your husband is not a good fit for the company.

      Two options seem front and foremost: 1) talking with HR and executive management in his function to request reassignment to another department (especially since there are departments willing to take your husband on) or 2) jumping ship to a company that values his talents. By requesting reassignment first before quitting, it will let your husband know whether he is valued by the company. These are not the only options, but they are the clearest options. He could also, of course, wait it out, or file an internal complaint if he believes the unfair treatment was motivated by a legally protected factor such as race. (Sometimes "fit" can be an implicit code for "white male" or "people not like you" so be alert for the explanation of how he doesn't fit!) Since his work record is so superb, I'm hoping the best thing will happen for him.

    • profile image

      Yen 

      3 weeks ago

      My husband was targeted by his new manager. The manager asked my husband to delete the work my husband was hired to do. The manager gave my husband a bad review noting on the review that my husband had been repeatedly told to do tasks verbally and had refused. My husband told the manager that is not the truth, and the manager told my husband that it is his word against my husbands words. He put my husband on probation, meaning for the next 2 years my husband will not be allowed to promote or transfer. My husband opened a case with HR, he prepared documentation to show his work. The previous review he had received, it was even written, said that they realize my husband had to work a lot extra and they will try to make sure he doesn't have to work so much extra. He had been with the company for 5 years and have always received very good reviews and bonuses. The HR rep he met with told my husband that the documentation/proof/past work performances are irrelevant because a manager is allowed to give any kind of review he wants, and will not need any proof. It is purely my husbands word against his managers. There are many other managers who will be willing to offer my husband a position, but my husbands current manager blocked the possibility of that by placing my husband on probation. My husband asked his manager if he would be willing to let him transfer. His manager said "No, I just don't think you are a good fit for this company" My husband feels too stressed to take any actions, (he doesn't want to think about it is what he is telling me) I really wish he would strike back and stand up to bullies. We have young children, and that is what we tell them to do. So I feel very frustrated that we tell our children one thing and we allow bullies to get away with bullying us because as parents we feel that our number one job needs to be providing security, therefore we have no choice but to move on. My husband is now interviewing with other companies. We feel like we have no choice but to leave. Please let me know if you have any advice. Thank you in advance.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      7 weeks ago from USA

      Anna - I'd ask your HR rep or management WHY your work is reviewed using a different process than other team members and why you are being treated differently from other employees. (Are they peers with the same or substantially similar jobs? That's the key.) Similarly, if you have not been adequately trained, ask for training or retraining so that you can perform your job satisfactorily.

      First try to problem solve the situation productively via discussion and collaboration, but don't be afraid to complain internally then externally to the EEOC or your state human right commision if you believe you are being treated differently due to one or more legally protected factors such as **race, sex, national origin, religion, color, disability, age, veteran status, etc. For a complete list of legally protected factors in your jurisdiction, check your labor law posters that should be on your company's bulletin board near HR or the front office. (Some states and local jurisdictions add protected factors such as sexual identity, marital status, etc.)

      The key is this: There's no legal protection for simply being disliked, but companies shouldn't treat you differently according to legally protected factors. If you work in a small organization, you may also not have these protections.

      I hope this helps.

    • profile image

      Anna 

      7 weeks ago

      Are these signs of managing me out:

      My work is reviewed in a different process comparing to other member

      Not allowed to talk or ask help for anyone in the team while the supervisor does not give much help

      Monitor my work hours

      Ask to change supervisor to review my work - they told me it was management decision but other team member is allocated with a different supervisor everyone they work on a new case

      Pls advise what to do

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      8 weeks ago from USA

      Ryan - Other than complain higher in your franchise management chain (which doesn't seem to be effective for you), I can only suggest calling the corporate office. If you think it's related to a legally protected factor as mentioned previously, you can file a complaint with the EEOC or your state human rights board. Sounds like a sneaky manager.

    • profile image

      Ryan Mizell 

      2 months ago

      Ive talked to the district manager about my hours being cut but she says katies a good person who looks out for me sp shez not gonna help i talked to my old gm today or yesterday to be exact and he said theyd always defend management over a driver unless i have hard proof.she gave me only 18 hours work time this next week.katies saying its cause of labor but everyone knows its retaliation.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      2 months ago from USA

      Ryan - You can go higher up the management chain to complain. If the franchise has HR, contact them. If that doesn't work, call franchise or corporate headquarters.

      The EEOC is for discrimination and harassment related to a legally protected factor such as race, sex, age, etc. They typically require that an employee complain internally through the company first. If you don't do that first, they'll deny the complaint.

      Hang in there and appeal to higher management, emphasizing how long you've been with the company and your work record.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      2 months ago from USA

      Ryan - If you have an employee handbook or employee portal, there should be a complaint process outlined. Some companies have corporate complaint lines, for example. Consider filing an internal complaint of retaliation. If you believe that your manager was motivated by an illegal discriminatory factor such as your race, sex, national origin, religion, color, disability, age, or veteran status, then it's important to specify that. Hope that helps.

    • profile image

      Ryan Mizell 

      2 months ago

      Its me again they transferred the manager that threayend me but my gm katie cut my hours from almost 40 a week to 22 this week and anytime i tty to cover someones shift katie wont let me my dm is on her side as well.some employees have told me katies walking around saying she wants to get rid of me.ive been there 13 yeats and dont wanna quit cause she wins she foes alot of stuff she shouldnt be doing im considering going to the eeoc .everyone says shell eventually find a way to boot me.is there anything i can do?

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      2 months ago from USA

      Ryan - If someone specifically threatened you with violence, you could always go to the police and file a report against them. No one should be threatened with violence on the job or off. Safety is your key concern.

    • profile image

      Ryan mizell 

      2 months ago

      Im having huve issue at pizza hut i was threatend by a supervisor with violence my gm katie wont do anything all she says if yall fight your fired.now shes mad i went to district manager.i think there gonna try and get rid of me at pizza hut

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 months ago from USA

      You mention that you get great customer reviews, are a high producer, and have a lot of senior level management experience. Based on the information you’ve provided, here are several observations.

      When it comes to job performance, there’s the “what” and the “how.” The “what” refers to work output. You seem to be nailing that. The “how” refers to communication and other soft skills, and indications are that’s all over the map.

      It appears that your manager doesn’t feel respected and may feel second guessed by someone who has more management experience. (The same may hold true for those two coworkers.) That’s a nice way of saying that perhaps you come across as a know-it-all, and they feel threatened by you. You could correctly call their reactions jealousy (of your work results), but it may also be a failure to professionally recognize others’ authority or competence. Regardless of what you think of them, these are the people your employer has selected to be your manager and teammates. You need to work more on trust with your coworkers. Keep your comments behavior-related. Perhaps have a discussion with one of your difficult colleagues to clear the air. Ask for feedback and request a fresh start in your relationship with them.

      Reflect on whether you’ve ever been told by anyone else that you’re negative, aggressive, argumentative, or don’t work well with others? Is this the ONLY time you’ve had such communication trouble at work? If not, then you may need to adjust your style.

      Definitely, learn to modulate your voice. Loud talking isn’t appreciated by many people, and it can quickly escalate a conflict. As a pointer, when you’re in conflict with coworkers, make sure you’re not standing up. Take a minute and sit down to discuss, as standing heightens the tension, especially if you’re the only one doing it. (Just a pointer.)

      I’m wondering why you’re still in this role, particularly since it’s making you so thoroughly unhappy? Believe me, I get that you have specific education tied to the job, but many people end up pursuing employment fields other than the one they were degreed in. That’s true even sometimes when they have invested years of advanced education (e.g., graduate degrees) or certifications. Surely this cannot be the only employment option for you. There have to be market competitors, customer organizations, or other companies that you could work for. You seem to be too big for the current role, whether you’ve outgrown it, have too much experience, or perhaps took something below your capabilities. Were you perhaps demoted or reassigned to this role, since you mention you have so many years of senior management experience?

      The coworkers who support you tell you they agree with you to your face, but what do they say behind your back? They may simply want to avoid conflict with everyone, you included.

      I hope these observations have been helpful. Best of luck with your situation.

    • Cjules1st profile image

      Cjules1st 

      3 months ago

      I was written up for lack of teamwork, aggression, negativity and being argumentative. I was just standing up for myself by using strong well formed educated sentences! I do have a loud voice so they think I’m yelling at them which I’m not. Two Co workers are sneaky and don’t follow the rules and are favored by the manager who stands up for them and thinks the rest of us are lying! I out perform these people so they want me out! They produce outright lies of communication between us and the manager believes them and says “ I don’t think you remember things well or you don’t think before you speak so you don’t remember what happens”. She doesn’t take anything I say as credible! 4 other coworkers see the crazy of the manager and these two coworkers and agree w me but won’t stand up and say anything in support. What can I do? I can’t loose this job as it is directly tied w specific education. I really don’t know what to do to make them happy. They act passive aggressive and do several of the behaviors in this article and it is wearing on the nerves. I get great customer reviews and am a high producer and the manager acknowledged that but because her “favorites” don’t like me that does not not seem to matter. Background info: i have many more years senior level manager experience than all these people but I am not the manager. I always make decisions/react w a manager hat on.

      Help!!!’ Any suggestions????

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 months ago from USA

      Benji - That's a mouthful. Good luck to you, and be well.

    • profile image

      zman12 

      3 months ago

      I have been in the same company my entire adult life, live in a region where I must be terminated at cause, and have endured and outlasted2 junior managers who wanted me out. It is for me, flourishanyway, a mark of pride for me. The mere threat of a union drive is a weapon against specific managers and senior management has no loyalty to their underlings.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 months ago from USA

      zman12 - That might be a good article -- how to make a bad manager go away. I was taught to believe that a workplace that has a union drive deserved it because they didn't take care of their employees. I hope you find a job you really love where you don't have to worry about people with sneaky tactics.

    • profile image

      zman12 

      3 months ago

      Fair enough flourishanyway, I never been part of a successful union drive, they all failed in the end, but they all were successful in making a manager with a bone to pick with me go away. When senior HR asks why it happened after the fact I always casually name drop said manager.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 months ago from USA

      zman12 - I've worked union election and decertification campaigns (representing the company side). I can tell you that organizing a union takes a lot of like-minded employees who have drive and focus as well as outside help from an interested union. While it's one thing to get coworkers' signatures, it's entirely different to get a union voted in. Then, even if you do, there's the issue of negotiating the first contract. It's not uncommon to fail to reach a first contract -- delays, disappointment, and finally, decertification. Sorry, but I didn't forget that step. I'm not trying to discourage you from doing that if that's what you want to do, but it's not exactly going to make you more employable about town.

    • profile image

      zman12 

      3 months ago

      You missed a couple potential steps, Flourishanyway, my response to a manager trying to make me disappear like that by freezing me out was to instigate a union drive. Usually management gets the boot, successful or not.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 months ago from USA

      Charles - That must have been some joke. At this point, you've handed in your notice, so you'll be looking for other work. The best you can do is try to make amends with coworkers and your boss and make it absolutely clear that the joke you made was in poor taste, you're truly embarrassed about it (so embarrassed you're leaving) and you hope that it doesn't change the way they feel about you. Apologize specifically to the person that the joke was mistakenly assumed to be about and clear the air with them. Get some references for your job search. Never tell jokes in the workplace again, even if they're good ones.

    • profile image

      Charles diskens 

      4 months ago

      I need help,I told a joke to my Co workers and my boss and Co workers tot I was talking about other person in my job.my boss yelled at me and told me that he was going to call the cops if the joke was true.I told him it was a misunderstanding of the joke.that forced me to hand in my notice.

      Does anyone have any advise to give to me please

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 months ago from USA

      Mike - It's sad that it happens, but it's really almost a recipe. Glad you're out of that environment, hopefully happy writing.

    • Readmikenow profile image

      Readmikenow 

      4 months ago

      Great article. When I worked in an office environment, which I did for years, I saw all of this happen to people. You provided some good information on a difficult topic. Enjoyed reading it. Thanks.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 months ago from USA

      Katerina GG - I'm a big believer in what goes around, comes around. Sometimes it takes a long time, but people who don't treat others well usually get what they deserve through their own doing. I'm sorry you were treated unfairly and hope that you are now happy.

    • Katerina GG profile image

      Katerina GG 

      4 months ago from Yorkshire UK

      This is a great article on this difficult topic. I was also forced to resign from my Govt. position through most of the things mentioned. I knew from the outset my manager didn't want me to get the job but was over-ruled by the other 2 on the selection panel - she made my life hell from minute one. She directed me to 'fix' who was recruited to my team - her friends basically - when the company boasted of a fair and open selection process. When I refused to play ball, she removed from the panel and appointed her friend to the job...and got away with it. She undermined every decision I made - it was horrific. Karma prevailed after I left and she got caught out badly and lost her job...it was a great day for me when I heard that news.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 months ago from USA

      Ashley - Sounds like a very toxic environment. You said she has no boss. I assume then that she owns a small business? Good luck in launching your own business. At least you have learned how to treat people and how not to treat people. Maybe you can take some good ones with you eventually.

    • punkmarkgirl profile image

      Ashley Bergin 

      4 months ago from san francisco

      The boss at my current job actually acts this way to ALL of her employees. I’ve been with them for 10 years and have seen 30+ people come and go. She is far too passive aggressive to fire anybody, so instead she does the “fire yourself” thing, until people are so annoyed with her that they quit. Many of the people who quit were very competent workers… the “problem” was that they were looking to promote growth and creativity, both of which the boss does not want, because it would mean more work for her. She currently chats on Facebook all day and does next to nothing to contribute at all. Since she has no boss, she gets away it scott-free.

      We all believe she creates this toxic environment because as long as we act like mindless robots she can 1) have the illusion of control over us and 2) slack on her own work, because we will do everything for her without question. There is ZERO communication from her (but all of the employees communicate with each other just fine). A quality boss would create a harmonious, positive environment where everybody is working together!!

      Since I act completely immune to all her games, plus have quite a hefty work load, she hasn’t been able to get rid of me. I’ve been using the down time on this job to build a company of my own – soon I can finally leave this place and get on with a productive life in my self-established business.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 months ago from USA

      Finn Liam Cooper - During such challenges, I have seen some employees crumble like a stale cookie while others were much more resilient. Glad you were able to withstand the assault with calmness and solemnity. Hope you're in a much better place now.

    • wpcooper profile image

      Finn Liam Cooper 

      4 months ago from Los Angeles

      Some good tips. Wish I would have come across this about five years ago. Phew. However, even if you do keep some things in mind, the survival instinct kicks in and I was surprised at how focused and calm I could keep myself in a tough situation.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      5 months ago from USA

      Mary - If there's any way to do so, then I agree. Unfortunately, some people are locked in with sign-on agreements, have tricky benefits or family situations that don't permit a lot of job movement, etc. There are a thousand reasons not to, but if you're really that miserable, you'll find a way.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 

      5 months ago from Ontario, Canada

      Flourish, I know there are many managers out there who are so incompetent, they don't know how to handle employees under them. Often, because of their incompetence, they are also insecure so many employees especially the more competent ones make them feel uneasy and try to let them go even if it will impact the company negatively. There's always appeal to higher management although most of the time, they will support the manager they have chosen. So, my advice is to go with grace and find another job where you will be appreciated.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      6 months ago from USA

      Seka76 - Performance appraisals usually cover a specific period of time in the job, not the entire person's employment history. Being that you're new to the role (3 months), you shouldn't be worried about simply meeting expectations, as there is a learning curve with many jobs. The best approach is to have a discussion about expectations, your positive work history, and your desire to learn. Assuming already that the boss doesn't like you may get you started on the wrong foot. Give both yourself and her some time and work positively together.

    • profile image

      Seka76 

      6 months ago

      I have been with my current company 10 and a half years so recently like 3 months ago I transferred to another location they just did my evaluation they gave me solid performer based of three months being new location. we are talking about same company . They didn't do my evaluation based of previous location and new location which in this case I feel I have been discriminated. Seems like I have worked only 3 months instead over 10 years.They didn't even bother to contact other location to ask or whatever. At other location I had an exceeds. I always get bad vibe from my boss that she just don't like me.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      7 months ago from USA

      Brooke Rummel - If there's a "formula," then it definitely happens to others. I hope this helps you move on. Sometimes it all rains down at work in a concerted effort to passively aggressively fire an employee. It involves terrible management and traumatized employees (including those on the sidelines who watched it happen). I hope you're in a better situation now.

    • profile image

      Brooke Rummel 

      7 months ago

      So incredibly grateful that I stumbled across this. It has answered so many questions and helped to clear up a lot for me after a nightmare I went through last year. It’s as if this were written based on my situation. It’s nice to have some validation and know that I’m not completely insane. Thank you.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      7 months ago from USA

      Denise - Amen! Don't hang on longer than you need to. There are other employers out there. Go find somewhere where you will feel valued.

    • profile image

      Denise 

      7 months ago

      If a company is mistreating you, giving you mixed signals, accolades on one hand and dis-approving messages on the other (speaking with forked tongues) find a better situation You will be glad you did. Nothing is as bad as organized creeps. You don't want to fit in with people you can't admire. They know who they are and how they roll. Don't admire people who don't care about people' lives.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      10 months ago from USA

      Unwanted - Sometimes these people realize they are in over their heads with management positions and they go away in a huff. Press on with your conversation with the owner so that she is not later rehired or urged to stay somehow. Cite that there were witnesses. Report that your phone has been stolen but don't blame her because you don't know. It's part of a pattern.

    • profile image

      Unwanted employee 

      10 months ago

      I hate to say this because I need the money to support my family. But when saw that I would no longer be working Monday's and Tuesdays anymore it was like a weight lifted of my shoulders!

      I asked my GM later on in the conversation "what should I do?" (We've known each other a long time!) She was reluctant to say, but she said "if you feel like she's singling you out, discrimination?" And that was the end of our conversation.

      Now I have until Friday to figure all this out. All I want to do is go to work, do my job, and go home. Now this "person" is doing this?

      I wonder if management would feel different if they knew she's about to quit anyways?. I'm sure that's irelavant, but it's just wrong. She has no children

    • profile image

      Unwanted employee 

      10 months ago

      It is NOT a small business. It is a franchise with 3 stores and around 400 employees. Only problem with that, is that our HR is the owner. The he has always liked me but now, I don't know what all she's been told ya know? As far as special skills, I have an Associates degree majoring in Hospitality Management. Plus several certifications. I've even helped her out. She didn't know what to do about an employee because she couldn't get in touch with the GM at the other store. I told her write an incident report. She replied "that's just it, I don't know where any of the paperwork is for that and, what is that?." I told her it could be on a sticky note! As long as it has the date and info on what occurred. Other employees also come to me about legal questions and I help them out. Now here I am and I don't know what to do. I don't understand why this occurred on a Tuesday yet it was not mentioned to me again until Sunday? When I was brought into the office to a write up. It states violation: "I have repeatedly failed to follow service excellence procidures." I looked up these "service excellence procedures" and if that's the "violation" then everyone there would be written up! I did not think to look up manager service excellence?!I was more looking for what i violated. It also states that  "Rebekah cannot comprehend what her daily task are. It seems like Rebekah wants to do what she wants to do and not follow procedures put in place." Now, if that's true, wouldn't I have heard about this already? I've been back since August of last year?

      Previous warning is left blank.

      Then the statement says "Rebekah will only be working 3 days a week and will be terminated if there are anymore complaints!" Putting me off of the days she manages. Also, I just noticed it was dated on the 3rd? It was presented to me Sunday the 5th of November?

      I was keeping notes, until my phone was stolen, at work, and the notes were in there. So I'm trying to remember as much as possible. And I never go into a meeting without notes, and a pad and pen to take notes during. I didn't feel safe!. Every single Monday and Tuesday I would feel pysically sick about going into work. What will I get yelled at for today, mocked for, stared at, just her waiting for something? She would get all over me for something that others do that is just not "her" way. This is most likely irelavant but just to give you an idea; Me and another girl had birthdays in August a couple of days apart. She said she meant to get me something but didn't have time. I never expected her to get me anything? But I thought it was a nice gesture. You know,, trying to be nice. The next day flowers came in with Happy birthday balloons, a cake, cupcakes and she had the cooks make 3 donuts put together that said happy birthday. I was like aww, that's so nice! She's trying and so am I.! Well,,,, they were for the other employee. Happy birthday written on the donuts was the other girls name, I mean, she could've at least thrown my name on one of the donuts. Instead, it was thrown in my face (figuratively). My feelings were so hurt I went home and just cried. I wasn't really expecting her to do anything for me, but to say you are? Then do that?

      Anyways,

      There was only a microwave above us and 2 industrial coffee machines and I don't think that qualifies as "machinery".

      Along with the lying, I also found out that she had noted that I wanted to go to HR about another employee.....That was never said? I came into work on a Friday and a fellow server said I heard you went to"her" and wanted HR contacted. I was like ummmm what? No I didn't. Not sure what's going on there. I asked my GM about it and she said yes, I seen that written in the book. I explained to her that was never said? And she kind of giggled and said "I saw it but nothing else was said so I left it alone"?

      There are also dates on the write up saying that I called out (insinuating that I called out on her shifts) I looked down at the dates. Well, one of them is my daughter's birthday. So I remember very much so that I did work that day,? What paperwork can I ask for?Should I ask the other two mangers that I used to work with on Mondays and Tuesdays to say that this never happened when they managed? I do have the cook/kitchen manager that has been there for 15yrs, I called him and asked if he heard the yelling. Well he did. So I have that, also the other server that was there said she heard her in the dining room screaming, we were in the kitchen? So there's a lie verified right there. We have cameras as well, which would show that when she said she wasn't in my ear, she actually was. Can I ask for those to be reviewed?

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      10 months ago from USA

      Unwanted - Describe that information to the owner because anyone truly concerned with running a solid business knows that this type of manager can only cause them more of this type of trouble next time she doesn’t get her way. Give them a chance to do the right thing when presented with all the facts. Also, given your information about being hearing impaired I wonder if your disability didn’t prompt her to yell so loudly right up in your face. Depending on the number of employees, you might pursue that line of thought. Good luck!

    • profile image

      Unwanted employee 

      10 months ago

      Yes ma'am, I see it now. Thank you.

      You hit the nail on the head when you said it seems she's let management go to her head!

      I'm not sure why she doesn't like me? I do know that when I came back, our GM took her off of Fridays and put me on instead. She started out by calling me a shift stealer. It was under her breath several times on different occasions. The last time, I heard a little more clearly. I turned and asked "what was that?" She said "oh nothing". I said "no, please tell me what you said I couldn't hear you?" She then stated that she had called me a shift stealer. I asked why and that's when I found that out. I'm thinking maybe she has had a vendetta against me every since, but not sure. She later on confided​ in me that she was "so pissed off when that happened that she almost quit." But, she started working at another location on Fridays.

      I know she singles me out, I feel like she hasn't cared for me since the very beginning. I do take medication for anxiety (PTSD) as well as the fact that I'm hearing impaired. I feel like she thinks she "better" than me because of this.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      10 months ago from USA

      Unwanted, Hopefully you've had a chance to review the response by now. To reduce spam, each comment submitted must be vetted and either approved or denied by me. The process cuts down on truly off-the-wall comments. I wish you well!

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      10 months ago from USA

      Unwanted - This is a terrible situation that happens all too often. Sounds like she has let her management position go to her head. Do you have any idea why she dislikes you? Unless it's based on some legally protected factor such as race, disability, national origin, gender, veteran status, etc. then it would probably be deemed "personal animus" (personal distaste) and that, unfortunately, is her prerogative. I know that is unfair. Also, it sounds like it's a small workplace and depending on how small it is, there may be fewer protections even if it is dislike based on a legally protected factor.

      Probably your best bet at this point is to carefully document for yourself all that you've accomplished in terms of work performance, years of service, company awards, teamwork (participation in work teams, etc.), your safety record, special skills, whatever else your company deems important that you bring to the table. Write these down as bullet points for yourself so when you meet with the owner you don't forget these important points. Emphasize that you love the COMPANY and you love your JOB except for this supervisor.

      Think about when the issue started, any important incidents involving this manager and others, any witnesses to her treatment of you (not just this one incident). Emphasize (if it's true) that no one else has ever had an issue with you. Be ready to describe this manager's actions and quote her word for word as close as you can recall. If you have work rules, look them up and bring a copy of them to the meeting. There's got to be rules about not lying, not abusively screaming at others or violating their personal space. If she was aggressively yelling in your ear near moving machinery, it's a potential safety issue: (remember the words "I didn't feel safe"). IF this was the case, be able to explain how and be able to describe the solution you seek. Good luck, unwanted!

    • profile image

      Unwanted employee 

      10 months ago

      FlourishAnyway.....I posted a comment earlier. Did you receive it? I cannot find it?

    • profile image

      The "unwanted employee" 

      10 months ago

      Hey there, I have recently been treated very unfairly by a manager that only manages 2 days out of the week and is an employee the other 3 days. I was hired back by a company that I had worked for 7 years prior. I had moved, then when I was planning to move "back home" to be with family, I went back to work for the same company. I love what I do! I enjoy (most of) my co-workers and to my knowledge they have no discrepancy with me. However, this one manger has not liked me since I was first hired back. It's like one day she's fine with me, then the next she's singling me out? She always worked Fridays, however, when I was rehired I was put on Fridays and she was taken off. She did not manage at this time. The 2 days she managed WERE my favorite days to work! They were laid back and problem free. She became manger 2 days a week several months into my return. Since then she has made me so uncomfortable that is hard to do my job properly. She makes me a nervous wreck! I do have anxiety issues and knowing that she's watching my every move waiting for me to do something wrong makes me so nervous. There was recently an incident where I was apparently unable to perform my usual task. She in turn begins to yell at me, and ask me why I didn't get the task done. I apologized, said I was sorry, and just said "ok" to everything she was saying. Too nervous to say anything else and trying to avoid yet another conflict with her. She then walked over to where I was and began yelling into my ear "I'm your manager" I began to block out what she was saying to keep from screaming back. Yet she kept on and on and on! I remember saying please do not yell into my ear. When she yelled "I'm your manager and I'll talk to you however I want!" That's when I couldn't block out anymore. Still, I said nothing. She continued, "I could write you up because I'm your manger but I'm not, I can send you home if I wanted because I'm your manager but I'm not!" Literally screaming this into my ear while all I could do was stand there. Five days later I was called into the office to a write up with her and the GM. Saying that I did not perform the task expected of me and that I would only be working 3 days a week. Also, that if anything else happened I would be terminated. I really did not know what to say? I was kind of in shock. Because honestly, I expected the "manger" to actually apologize later on realizing how she had acted! I brought up her screaming at me. She stood there and flat out LIED!!!! That she "did not get in my face, and that she wasn't talking any louder than we were" right then. I could not believe she was saying that. It upset me so bad I looked at her and said "You are lying? "How can you stand here and lie like that?" I then walked out. When she left the office I returned to speak with my GM. Me and her had an adult conversation. Something not possible with "her" in there. I explained that I did not feel comfortable signing it or commenting at that time. I was given the write up and told to bring it back in 5 days (also given some friendly advice from the GM) It ultimately lays in the owners hands. I don't know what to do. I'm a single mother of two children and cannot support us working 3 days a week. Also, outside of "her" I love what I do.

      Do you have any advice for me?

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      12 months ago from USA

      Melania - Thanks for weighing in.

    • profile image

      Melania 

      12 months ago

      I agree with Efficient Admin

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      12 months ago from USA

      Sam - I'm sorry that is happening to you. I agree with your assessment. I hope you are able to take control of the situation and find a better opportunity.

    • profile image

      Sam 

      12 months ago

      All what was mentioned of the 12 are very true and identical to what is happening to me now. It is very dirty, no moral and aggravating

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      13 months ago from USA

      anonymous - I hear you. Good for you that you did the best thing for yourself.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      13 months ago

      I walked out of a job like this and management acted oblivious. A lot of strategies to quantify ROI and a lazy manager. Who needs that?

    • RandallJonas profile image

      Randall Jonas 

      14 months ago from Canada

      most welcome

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      14 months ago from USA

      Randall - Thanks for reading. Unfortunately, these behaviors are all too common in the modern workplace.

    • RandallJonas profile image

      Randall Jonas 

      14 months ago from Canada

      This is informative and highlights many of the realities of tacit things that go on in the workplace.

      Thank-you

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      14 months ago from USA

      employee - It's not a "how to" but rather a description of what bosses do so employees can be savvier. I hope you get back on your feet again, bud.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      17 months ago from USA

      Eric - HR reps can do that. Not all of them are like that. Something had to prompt them to concentrate on you?

    • profile image

      Eric 

      17 months ago

      My HR sides with my manager and gang up against me.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      19 months ago from USA

      Efficient Admin - That would be a good one! Thank you.

    • Efficient Admin profile image

      Efficient Admin 

      19 months ago from Charlotte, NC

      I'd love to see an article on how employees can make an unwanted manager go away.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      19 months ago from USA

      Mary - So many jobs disappeared and are continuing to disappear during my lifetime, often silently. Even if computers take over, there must be the programmers, technicians, and data strategists to keep it going. Thanks for commenting.

    • profile image

      Mary 

      19 months ago

      pretty soon, nobody will have to "work" as computers will take over completely. I am looking forward to this.

      This judgmental hodgepodge called work is distracting the human race to move ahead.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      20 months ago from USA

      New managers - Well said. Not a smart move on their behalf. Thanks for commenting.

    • profile image

      New managers 

      20 months ago

      Frequently, when younger managers get hired, they come in like gangbusters, working 80 hours a week and make a great impression on their bosses. They then consolidate their power by getting rid of older employees to put in place their own hires. They pick the older employees' brains before running them out. So unfair.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      23 months ago from USA

      HR Executive - You're towing the party line and I do not disagree with you. It's how managers SHOULD behave. However, I present here the realities of what managers may do because 1) HR doesn't know everything that's going on and 2) there are a LOT of terrible managers out there at ALL levels who masquerade as leaders. Sadly, HR often thinks it knows what's going on in the organization but it's not always the case. Managers who haven't done the right thing in coaching, progressive discipline, etc. often resort to the easy way out. That's what is presented here. Again, I applaud you for your commitment to honest, open and fair treatment of your employees.

    • profile image

      HR Executive 

      23 months ago

      Our company doesn't tolerate managers who adopt 'sneaky' ways. We just look for a Manager who can manage their people properly through respectful engagement and communication. If we have this going on, it puts the company at legal risk. We actually remove the managers who behave like this in our organization as we adopt a respectful fair treatment policy. The motto is, if you can't manage people that have different personalities, then you shouldn't be managing.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      2 years ago from USA

      Rajan - Thanks for stopping by. It's often easier for third parties to see than it is for the person involved.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 

      2 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Excellent hub Flourish. I can certainly relate to a few of these strategies.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      2 years ago from USA

      pinto2011 - I like how you phrase that! We all need to be in an environment where we can be appreciated and make a difference. Have a great week.

    • pinto2011 profile image

      Subhas 

      2 years ago from New Delhi, India

      You have really done great justice to this subject. I always think it is better to quit than to blubber. It is always nice to be where am wanted......

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      2 years ago from USA

      Chloe - Good for you. Now, keep your chin up and don't look back.

    • profile image

      Chloe 

      2 years ago

      I'm so happy to have the opportunity to leave my awful job. I gave them two weeks too long, should have made my resignation effective immediately. A work place should be nice and pleasant since one is giving up the best day, everyday of life in general, from 8-5pm, to be inside an office with losers.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      Audrey -That is so sad, but it isn't surprising because for some people work is everything, Thanks for providing that anecdote.

    • brakel2 profile image

      Audrey Selig 

      3 years ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

      Hi Flourish - Excellent hub with lots of effort put into it. In my experience, these means of getting rid of employees is so true. The workplace is a complicated scenario. Politics and favoritism come into play, and all the variables you have mentioned. It seems like it has even become more complicated. You have incompetent employees and incompetent supervisors and sometimes the good folks leave. I know of an employee who was charged unfairly, and when it hit the paper, he committed suicide. This may be a rare incident, but it is not fair. But what is fair? Sharing. Blessings, Audrey

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      Rangoon House - Thanks for stopping by and for commenting. Have a good weekend.

    • Rangoon House profile image

      AJ 

      3 years ago from Australia

      Gosh. If it isn't a graveyard, it's certainly a minefield!

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      ezzly - Yes, it can get ugly indeed when people have their coworkers pitted against them. I appreciate your reading and commenting.

    • ezzly profile image

      ezzly 

      3 years ago

      Excellent article voted up. I've seen and heard way too many cases of constructive dismissal it can get pretty nasty especially when co workers get involved! Thanks for writing this !

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      vespawoolf - It's very unfortunate that it happens this way, as it produces so much stress and strain in the entire work group. People can figure out what's happening and they basically have to pick a side. Thanks for reading and commenting.

    • vespawoolf profile image

      vespawoolf 

      3 years ago from Peru, South America

      It´s difficult to be in this situation. I´ve heard many stories. Managers are often under pressure, but it doesn´t justify these low tactics. As you pointed out, the manager lacks directness or skills if he can´t just directly deal with the situation. Thank you for this useful information written from experience.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      Efficient Admin - We used to joke about someone like that (especially a long timer who could get away with anything) as being someone who must have naked pictures of an executive. It seems like the only explanation sometimes, huh?

    • Efficient Admin profile image

      Efficient Admin 

      3 years ago from Charlotte, NC

      The very first paragraph of this hub describes to a tee a non-management coworker in my office who is also loud, overbearing, does not listen, talks over people, arrogant and everyone is scratching their heads why she was not laid off in the last round. She has been with the company 30 years and management knows she has issues but they seem to tiptoe around her. She is also a Frenemy described in your other hub. None of the women in the office trust her not one bit. Everyone is wondering how much longer she will be there.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      Audrey - Forewarned is forearmed. Thank you for the kind kudos, and have a great weekend.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 

      3 years ago from California

      Really an excellent article on the subject--but it does make me sad

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      blueheron - In another hub, Time To Take Action: When the Boss Is A Bully Or Worse, I touch on documentation. Especially if the order comes from above, you'll probably eventually find yourself out of a job (through quitting, downsizing, getting fired, etc.), but you can preserve your professional and personal integrity, health, and self-esteem.

    • blueheron profile image

      Sharon Vile 

      3 years ago from Odessa, MO

      Normally and employer would prefer not to fire you because if you quit you will be unable to collect unemployment. So that part is easy to understand. Usually you will not see your boss communicating with you by email or in writing. He/she is more likely to insist on engaging face-to-face (while usually being unavailable) for either email or face-t0-face discussion. He/she does NOT want written documentation, particularly if it has a date on it. YOUR strategy should be to aim to put all requests for direction, supplies--whatever you need--in an email. Go to any evaluation armed with email records showing your attempts to communicate your needs and issues, and probably also showing that your boss never responded to your emails or otherwise never followed through.

      My daughter recently had this type of problem with a college teacher who continually asked for face-to-face discussions--in which there would be no written proof of anything that was said.

      Often, too, the decision to fire you comes from on high. The boss or bosses that used to love you has been ordered to find a way to get rid of you. This happened to me once. I went from being the bosses' pet to noticing them following me around spying on me, looking for something to criticize.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      suzettenaples - Having investigated employee complaints and thus been privy to all perspectives, I learned that just when I thought I had heard it all, someone would invent a new twist on how to make another person's life hell at work. Thanks for the kind words. Have a great week.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      MizBejabbers - Good for you that you took charge. While no employee is untouchable or "bullet proof" it is possible to fight back if you play your cards right and have the energy for it.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      blueheron - It's an ugly thing to watch, eh?

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      Redneck Lady Luck - I hope you are happier and healthier for having moved on. Thank you for telling your story, as it makes people realize they are not alone.

    • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      ologsinquito - Thanks so much! I really appreciate your support! Have a terrific week!

    • suzettenaples profile image

      Suzette Walker 

      3 years ago from Taos, NM

      Excellent and comprehensive article. You cover everything that could happen on the job. It is too bad that there are such petty managers on the job. Your suggestions on what to do about it are excellent. You have really thought this through.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      Doris James-MizBejabbers 

      3 years ago

      These are very good suggestions, and most people face one or more of these situations during their career. May I add one more? Document things that you feel are being done to you. If a supervisor or administrator says something out of context or you know not to be true, document it. Keep a file of this, especially if someone is slandering you. Keep your file at home or on a thumb drive because it may someday be useful. I say this because it happened to me.

      When I threatened a slander lawsuit, I also had three witnesses lined up to testify. The lawsuit was nipped in the bud and I am still here seven years later. Sometimes I regret not following through because there was retaliation in such a manner that I couldn’t prove retaliation and didn’t get a promotion that I deserved. At least I kept my job and can choose my own retirement date. Voted you up++

    • blueheron profile image

      Sharon Vile 

      3 years ago from Odessa, MO

      Pawpaw, I suspect that you actually did figure out how he got the job, but would rather not say! Late in life, I learned the value of being in the gossip loop. This is how you find out who is related to whom, who is having an affair with whom, who was jilted by whom, who is pulling the strings from behind the scenes--that is, the actual reasons for everything.

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