Eight Ways to Get Your Boss to Appreciate You at Work

Updated on August 30, 2019
Glenn Stok profile image

Glenn Stok acquired strategic management skills with organization, planning and policy development from his employment and his own business.

When I started working in a major corporation after graduating from college, I moved up the ladder quickly. I’ll discuss eight things I did that worked for me and can help you advance in your company too.

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Display Competence and Ability to Work on Your Own

Your career depends on what your manager thinks you’re capable of doing. That can have a significant impact on future promotions.

To achieve more success than other employees, do some self-study to improve your knowledge and experience.

Never ask your boss to help give you a solution to a problem without first giving it some thought on your own. Your boss will notice that you're competent.

When you come up with a method of solving a problem, it's an indicator that you are potential management material. (Did I hear someone say promotion?)

Do More Than What Management Expects

If you can't handle what your boss expects of you, then you may end up looking incompetent. If this is happening, discuss it with your boss and mutually try to work out alternative solutions. Your manager might consider changing deadlines.

Always try to work beyond expectations. It shows that you care to give back more than others and you will stand out as an achiever.

Show Managers That You Are a Team Player

Don't hesitate to share your thoughts and make your ideas known.

All the ideas you share can influence your boss that you deserve a promotion to a job position where you can better apply your talents.

For this reason, it’s always important to discuss what you’ve been working on. Let your boss know how you feel about the job you have and how you are applying yourself.

Always make it a goal to give your boss a vision of what you can be doing in a different position and other ideas you may have that can benefit the company.

Just one thing to keep in mind: When you put the time and effort into generating your own ideas, don’t let your other responsibilities suffer for it. Keep working on your assigned tasks and make sure you stay up to date with schedules. Your efforts at providing solutions to different problems should come after you complete your assigned duties.

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Confirm Priorities From Time to Time

If you feel overloaded with several tasks, let your boss know about the jobs you’re working on and the priorities you are giving to them. That will help your boss recognize what you are achieving. Your boss might even back off a little, but only if you are meeting the deadlines.

If you can’t meet deadlines, discuss the importance of each step with your boss. I have a method that always worked—Give your boss a feeling of power by asking for an opinion on priorities. You never want to take that feeling away. Make it work to your advantage.

That method should take some of the pressure off you without making it sound like you are complaining.

Show Empathy Towards Your Boss

Let your boss know that you appreciate the importance of your job. Think about the impact it has on the company from your boss’s point of view. Consider what he or she is going through, as far as getting the job done is concerned. It’s pressure on your boss too.

Show your boss that you understand the priorities. The last thing they want to hear is that you don’t appreciate the importance of the work involved. Let them know that you share the same goals and values.

Propose Solutions to a Problem

Providing a solution to a problem is a great way to show that you are competent and that you understand the issues involved. Your manager will soon recognize that you can be trusted to work on more critical tasks.

Eventually, they will give you more responsibilities. With that, it usually means a promotion.

Use an Elevator Pitch to Present Your Ideas

If you find it challenging to get into a meeting with your boss to discuss your ideas, plan to do a presentation when the opportunity arrives.

You’ve heard of the elevator pitch? Well, plan one. Keep it ready in your mind to use when the opportunity presents itself. That can happen anywhere at any time.

When you get the chance, pique your boss’s interest with a brief explanation of an issue you’re aware of, and with just a couple of sentences describe your solution that you envision and why it will help.

Create a Vision of Your Potential

You can show upper management that you are an essential entity in the company. If you think of innovative ways to improve things, don’t keep it to yourself. You need to share it with management.

Your ideas may be a better value to your company than you realize. When you know how to share your thoughts, you may even achieve more respect and appreciation for it. That could mean job security!

You may end up creating a new position for yourself—with career advancement.

You Have the Power

It's essential to understand the power that you have and what you can do with it. When you apply these methods, your boss will recognize your efforts and will appreciate you for the work you can do. It will have a tremendous impact on your career path within your current employment.

© 2009 Glenn Stok

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