How to Get a Stress Leave From Work

Updated on September 3, 2019
FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway is an Industrial/Organizational Psychologist with applied experience in corporate human resources and consulting.

A majority of workers experience chronic stress. If you are considering taking a "stress leave" from your job, learn what you need to know before you request a medical leave of absence for anxiety, depression, or another mental health condition.
A majority of workers experience chronic stress. If you are considering taking a "stress leave" from your job, learn what you need to know before you request a medical leave of absence for anxiety, depression, or another mental health condition. | Source

A Stress Leave From Work Can Be a Temporary Rescue

Feel like you're sinking fast? If you're contemplating a "stress leave" from work, then chances are high that the psychological demands of your life are fast exceeding your ability to cope. Set aside any shame—it's unproductive—and instead, focus on taking care of yourself.

Americans typically spend more time on the job than they do at home, yet too often they find themselves struggling with issues like

  • excessive workloads, impossible deadlines, and long work hours
  • bullying, discrimination, and harassment
  • lack of control over tasks, unclear expectations, and insufficient resources
  • conflict with co-workers and micromanaging bosses and
  • poor work-life balance.

Unfortunately, a majority of American workers experience chronic levels of stress, and it's highest among women and workers with children under 18.1 Exposure to such chronic stress is a health hazard which can aggravate chronic physical ailments and contribute to anxiety disorders, depression, PTSD, and other mental illnesses.

If you're suffering mental health challenges you're not alone. More than one in five Americans experience a mental illness during any given year,2 and almost half of Americans will battle a mental illness at some point during their lifetimes.3 Take care of your psychological needs with a temporary reprieve from a stressful job, if you need one. Here are the nuts and bolts of what you need to know about taking a stress-based leave of absence.

More than one in five Americans experience a mental illness during any given year, and almost half of Americans will battle a mental illness at some point during their lifetimes.
More than one in five Americans experience a mental illness during any given year, and almost half of Americans will battle a mental illness at some point during their lifetimes. | Source

Here's Where to Start with a "Stress Leave"

If you're exploring the possibility of taking a stress-based leave of absence, then here are the general steps to follow:

  1. Make an appointment with your healthcare provider. Regardless of what happens later, you're stressed out and need professional help in addressing your symptoms now. Don't wait until you're facing an urgent situation.
  2. Not every employee is eligible for a medical leave of absence, so check to see if you qualify before your appointment with your healthcare provider. Review the company's family and medical leave policy as well as any state and local leave laws. Print the forms for your healthcare provider to complete and sign.
  3. Before your appointment, also review your short-term disability plan, if you are covered by one. Not everyone is. (Short-term disability insurance allows for your stress-related time off to be at least partially paid.) Review the policy, and print the forms for your healthcare provider to complete and sign.

Important information is provided below on each of these steps.

If you're sinking fast, check to see if you're eligible for FMLA. FMLA allows covered employees to take unpaid time off from their job while their group health insurance benefits continue to be covered and their job is protected.
If you're sinking fast, check to see if you're eligible for FMLA. FMLA allows covered employees to take unpaid time off from their job while their group health insurance benefits continue to be covered and their job is protected. | Source

Step 1: Make an Appointment with Your Healthcare Provider

Technically, there is no such thing as a "stress leave." You'll actually be applying for a medical leave of absence from your job, and the medical condition is psychological in nature. To request a leave, you'll need a diagnosis from a healthcare provider, plus the medical leave of absence forms for your healthcare provider to fill out and sign. (You'll be under their medical care for the duration of your leave.)

It also helps if you read the relevant leave company policies in advance to reduce the chances of surprises. Most companies have the required forms and corresponding policies available on their company intranet. You can also ask your HR representative. You don't need to verbally volunteer to HR that it's a "stress leave" you're seeking, just a medical leave.

Arrange to see a clinical psychologist, social worker, counselor, psychiatrist, or family doctor for your symptoms of depression, anxiety, or other mental illness. The diagnosis is up to them. Your role is to describe your symptoms. Don't hold back in honestly and forcefully detailing the following information to your health care provider:

  • your stressors and how your work environment affects your mental and physical health (including migraines, tension headaches, worsening of any autoimmune conditions, etc.)
  • what your emotional and physical symptoms are, including your drug/alcohol abuse, risky behavior, and thoughts of self-harm
  • symptom severity and how long you've felt this way
  • how your stress gets in the way of your performing your work or full functioning (e.g., focus, safety, productivity, reporting to work) and
  • what makes your symptoms worse or better, including coping efforts, medications, or therapies you've tried.

The person you need to persuasively convince of your need for time off is your healthcare provider because they will need to complete and sign off on your leave request. Ask them directly if they will support you taking a leave of absence from work. You can suggest an initial leave duration period or see what length of leave they recommend. (As an HR professional, I've seen that healthcare providers often approved at least a month for psychological illnesses.) Make sure you have the forms from your HR department with you.

Before submitting the completed documents to the company, make a copy for yourself. Although you are providing permission for the company to communicate with your healthcare provider about your condition, remember two things:

  1. healthcare providers are usually brief and exceptionally careful about sharing patients' HIPPA-protected private medical information
  2. your management won't see your medical information because medical records are kept separate from personnel records at work and the information is handled with utmost confidentiality.

Don't be concerned about taking the needed time off. You do not have to share the reason for your leave with your management, co-workers, or anyone else who has no legitimate business need to know.

Stress can impact your body, mood, and behavior.  It can negatively impact your quality of life and increase your risk for deadly diseases.
Stress can impact your body, mood, and behavior. It can negatively impact your quality of life and increase your risk for deadly diseases. | Source

Effects of Stress on Your Body, Mood & Behavior

 
 
 
Headaches, migraines
Anxiety/Restlessness
Drug and/or alcohol misuse
Muscle tension or pain
Lack of motivation and focus
Higher heart rate and higher blood pressure
Chest pain
Sadness or depression
Increased risk for heart disease and stroke
Fatigue
Irritability or anger
Social withdrawal
Diminished sex drive
Feeling overwhelmed
Decreased metabolism, increased appetite, weight gain
Gastrointestinal issues: trouble with digestion, stomach upset, diarrhea, vomiting, IBS
Lack of motivation or focus
Exercising less often
Sleep disturbances/insomnia
Overeating or undereating
Increase in anger
Irregular menstrual periods/decreased fertility (females)
Tobacco use
Acne breakouts
Risk for death under age 45
Risk for Type 2 diabetes
Stress hives
How many of these stress-related effects are you experiencing? Sources: WebMD, Gallup, NIMH
While there is technically no such thing as "stress leave," if you qualify, you can take a medical leave of absence for psychological reasons.  Examples include depression or an anxiety disorder. There's no shame in taking care of your health.
While there is technically no such thing as "stress leave," if you qualify, you can take a medical leave of absence for psychological reasons. Examples include depression or an anxiety disorder. There's no shame in taking care of your health. | Source

Step 2: Determine Whether You Qualify for Federal Family and Medical Leave

Not every worker can take a medical leave, so assess whether you qualify for federal family and medical leave. FMLA affords an employee the job-protected ability to temporarily leave one's job then return. The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was initially passed in 1993 for the purpose of permitting covered employees to take reasonable, unpaid periods of time away from work in these situations:

  • personal medical leave to attend to one's own serious health conditions, including pregnancy complications
  • family medical leave to attend to the serious health conditions of eligible family members
  • parental bonding leave upon the arrival of a child by birth, adoption, or foster care placement.

A 2008 amendment then added two additional military service-related rationales for granting federal FMLA:

  • qualifying exigency leave to help manage family affairs when an employee's family members are deployed or on active duty and
  • military caregiver leave to provide care for an injured or seriously ill active service member or veteran who is a covered relative or next of kin.

In short, what FMLA does is this: it allows covered employees to take unpaid time off from their job while their group health insurance benefits continue to be covered and their job is protected. Think of FMLA as a job "placeholder." Employees on FLMA are permitted time away from work to focus on their health or personal issue(s), and then they are reinstated to their previous job or an equivalent job.

Am I Eligible for FMLA?

Gauge your eligibility for FMLA by reviewing the following factors related to employer size and length of employment:

  • You work for an employer at a location with at least 50 employees within a 75-mile radius
  • You have worked for the company for at least a year AND
  • You have worked for your employer at least 1,250 hours during the previous 12-month period.

How Much Time Away From Work Does FMLA Provide?

Under the FMLA, eligible employees can receive up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave or up to 26 weeks for issues that relate to relatives who are service members and require care. Leave can be taken continuously, intermittently, or a combination of the two types. Intermittent leave is sometimes known as reduced schedule leave and can be an especially valuable benefit for employees struggling with depression, anxiety, or other mental illnesses. You may find that a schedule of four-hour days, four-day weeks, or several hours off here and there can provide you needed relief for your medical condition. FMLA provides incredible flexibility so apply for it and use it, if needed.

A small number of states and localities have laws that require paid family and medical leave. Make sure you know the law in your jurisdiction.
A small number of states and localities have laws that require paid family and medical leave. Make sure you know the law in your jurisdiction. | Source

Check State Family and Medical Leave Laws Too

In addition to federal FMLA, some states and even localities have their own family and medical leave laws. You may wonder: What's the point of having a state family and medical leave law when we already have the federal FMLA? State leave laws can be altogether different from federal FMLA. They can also be more generous. Examples include:

  • lower eligibility thresholds and wider coverage, such as shorter length of service requirements and leave laws applying to smaller employers
  • expanded leave time for certain situations
  • inclusion of certain types of leaves that the FMLA does not cover (e.g., school visitation, organ and bone marrow donation, crime victim leave, short-term family leave) and
  • paid family and medical leave.

It pays to be informed, so be sure to check the leave law for your specific jurisdiction, focusing particular attention on eligibility requirements and the benefits that the leave law provides. Google "family and medical leave law + (the name of your state)." You can also check your workplace's Human Resources and Compliance bulletin board. Workplaces are required by law to physically post legal notices affecting employment where all applicants and employees can see them. Usually, the legal employment postings bulletin board is in or around HR.

In the best of circumstances, FMLA and STD run in parallel with FMLA affording you time off from work and STD permitting you to get paid for your time off.
In the best of circumstances, FMLA and STD run in parallel with FMLA affording you time off from work and STD permitting you to get paid for your time off. | Source

Step 3: Short-Term Disability and Getting Paid for Medical Leave

You may be wondering, "Will I be paid for my medical leave?" Note that Federal FMLA does NOT cover compensation for leave. Since you're already stressed, it's important not to add financial pressures to your burden. Let's make sure your stress leave will be paid, if at all possible.

Assuming you don't work in one of the handful of jurisdictions that offer paid sick leave, then your best option is likely to rely upon short term disability (STD) benefits. About two-thirds of workers have STD benefits through their employer or another source.4 This type of insurance is most commonly offered through medium and large-sized employers, but workers can also buy STD coverage individually or at group rates through a professional organization, college alumni society, or another group they belong to. If you're unsure about whether you are covered by an STD plan at work, ask your Human Resources department.

Prior to taking leave, review your STD policy and pay special attention to

  • notification requirements for filing a claim
  • the length of any "elimination period," a waiting period before approved claims are paid out—usually about a week
  • the percent of weekly salary paid (up to a pay cap) - it's standard to receive 60% of your weekly salary while on STD, although some plans pay 100% or may base payments on the employee's length of service
  • whether your employer requires employees to use up all paid vacation time, sick time, personal time, etc.
  • duration of STD benefits - often 3-6 months
  • policy exclusions such those involving pre-existing conditions or acts of self-harm.

In the best of circumstances, FMLA and STD run in parallel with FMLA affording you time off from work and STD permitting you to get paid for your time off. You may be required to periodically supply updated information from your healthcare provider about your progress. When you are ready to return to work, your healthcare provider will need to certify your fitness for duty. Alternatively, he or she can also request extensions to your leave of absence if you are not yet ready to return.

Spending Your Medical Leave Wisely

How you spend your stress-based medical leave of absence is up to you. Typically, you cannot be employed elsewhere, even part-time, when on a medical leave of absence. However, you can rest, exercise, pursue hobbies that relax you, catch up with friends and family, learn better coping and relaxation strategies, and focus on improving your wellbeing.

During your leave, sincerely explore whether your current job provides the work environment that best suits you and your skill set. If the answer is no, then it's the ideal time to retool your resume, update your Linked In profile, and get a head start on your job search. While the point of your leave of absence is to return you to work, it doesn't necessarily have to be to a job that causes you ill health. Sometimes when we face duress we need to change ourselves. At other times, we need to change our environments. Do what is required to take care of you.

While you're out on stress-based medical leave, pursue coping and relaxation strategies but also consider whether your current job is the right environment for you and your skills. Don't be afraid to change yourself or your environment as needed.
While you're out on stress-based medical leave, pursue coping and relaxation strategies but also consider whether your current job is the right environment for you and your skills. Don't be afraid to change yourself or your environment as needed. | Source

References

1Belli, G. (2017, March 30). Most American workers are stressed most of the time. Retrieved from https://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/29/most-american-workers-are-stressed-most-of-the-time.html

2Mental Health By the Numbers. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.nami.org/learn-more/mental-health-by-the-numbers

3Kessler, R. C., Berglund, P., Demler, O., Jin, R., Merikangas, K. R., & Walters, E. E. (2005). Lifetime Prevalence and Age-of-Onset Distributions of DSM-IV Disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62(6), 593. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.62.6.593

4Schott, F. (2018, April 26). How Many Working Americans Have Adequate Disability Coverage? Retrieved from https://blog.disabilitycanhappe1n.org/how-many-americans-have-disability-coverage/

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

Questions & Answers

    © 2019 FlourishAnyway

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      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        9 days ago from USA

        Dianna Mendez - If short term disability is a benefit that employees have available to them and they'd use it for a physical ailment such as to recuperate from a car accident, then I'd hope they'd take the time to recuperate from mental/emotional strain if a medical professional authorized it. If the company makes the benefit available, the company expects that some employees will use it. It's better to have employees receive the care they need than continue to deteriorate in health and have that impact job performance. In the end, it's a benefit that helps everyone.

      • teaches12345 profile image

        Dianna Mendez 

        11 days ago

        Great article on work stress and how to overcome the effects. It is nice to know there are companies out there who support people who may need help and time away from work.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        11 days ago from USA

        Eric - Thank you, Eric. Hopefully, people can take good care of themselves and never have to take stress leave (or better yet, have a wonderful job that doesn't stress them out). I appreciate your reading and stopping back by. Have a wonderful week.

      • Ericdierker profile image

        Eric Dierker 

        11 days ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

        I come back to encourage others to follow here. It is critical that we know that if we do not care we do not fall in stress. That caring and recognition of it is what builds lives and love. Do it and stand the course. Take that leave. Follow Flourish. Do it!

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        12 days ago from USA

        Erin Shelby - Thank you for reading and commenting.

      • erinshelby profile image

        erinshelby 

        13 days ago from United States

        Very informational article- good job.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        2 weeks ago from USA

        Yves - Thanks for your kind words. It's great when employers offer STD insurance although not everyone has it through work. I hope your Labor Day has been a good one.

      • savvydating profile image

        Yves 

        2 weeks ago

        Flourish....Work related stress is such a big problem. I am glad you have written this article. Many people who are suffering needlessly may find the help they need through the information you have kindly provided here.

        Even for those who feel well, signing up for Short Term Disability can be a very wise decision, in my opinion. One never knows when one might need the insurance!

        Another great article, as usual.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        2 weeks ago from USA

        Devika - You're right. Everyone has their limits. We all have different levels of tolerance for stress.

      • DDE profile image

        Devika Primić 

        2 weeks ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

        Useful and true with the demands of the fast moving lifestyle one has to put with these days. One can only take that much of anything and work loads can do just that.

      • Robert Sacchi profile image

        Robert Sacchi 

        3 weeks ago

        Good points.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        3 weeks ago from USA

        Bob - None of us are indispensable employees. Unless an employee works under contract, a company can typically terminate them at-will -- for a good reason, bad reason, or no reason at all and on a moment's notice. Of course, the discharge cannot violate federal or state law or company policies such as anti-discrimination policies. Some managers try to make undesired employees go away, making it the employee's choice. Others cut the position.

      • Robert Sacchi profile image

        Robert Sacchi 

        3 weeks ago

        It seems if a company can do without an employee for a month they don't need the employee. Is there a backdoor way of easing out the employee after they employee comes back? Could they eliminate someone else's slot after the employee comes back?

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Chitrangada - Thank you for reading. The work world is increasingly stressful and I hope this benefits those who need it.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Ken - Thanks for stopping by.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Jeannie - Do more with less, that's the name of the game. However, there's a downside, and unfortunately it's the employee who bears that burden. Thanks for visiting, and it's great to see you writing again!

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Bill - You'll absolutely love having the freedom to make your own schedule, although the lack of structure can be a bit alarming at first as well as liberating. You'll quickly figure out how to deal with it productively, however!

      • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

        Chitrangada Sharan 

        4 weeks ago from New Delhi, India

        Excellent article and great information.

        This is particularly helpful for today’s lifestyle and hectic work schedule. Life today, is not that simple as it used to be earlier. Due to increased expectations, and competition, mental stress is quite common, especially amongst youngsters.

        Your well written article is full of great suggestions. Thanks for sharing.

      • Ken Burgess profile image

        Ken Burgess 

        4 weeks ago from Florida

        Very interesting and informative read.

      • Jeannieinabottle profile image

        Jeannie Marie 

        4 weeks ago from Baltimore, MD

        This is good information. It seems like the demands put on workers increases each year. I've seen a change just within the last 10 years. I blame the recession for this. Less people to do a job, but perfection is expected. Hopefully over time this will get better, but for now, it's good to know there is a way to get out for a break.

      • bdegiulio profile image

        Bill De Giulio 

        4 weeks ago from Massachusetts

        Great information Flourish. I have good friends who have taken a leave from work due to stress and it's sad to see the negative effects that it places on people. Thankfully, I'm getting close to the end of my 8 to 5 routine in the next few years. I hate to wish away years, but I'm certainly looking forward to the next phase, one where I can write and travel more.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Dora - I'm all about building options for people. When people feel limited or backed into a corner, they often make poor choices. Thanks for reading.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Linda - Thank you for reading. I hope so as well.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        James - Terrific. Thank you for that reference. And thanks for reading.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Heidi - It is tricky! That's one of the reasons I wrote the article. It's harder than it needs to be, and the person is already stressed out. Although it's a temporary fix, a "time out" from work can be what some people need to reboot and recharge or to figure out they need to do something else. Thank you for your kind words.

      • AliciaC profile image

        Linda Crampton 

        4 weeks ago from British Columbia, Canada

        This is a very informative and useful article, Flourish. I expect it will be helpful for many people.

      • MsDora profile image

        Dora Weithers 

        4 weeks ago from The Caribbean

        Great counsel on getting a stress leave from work. Appropriate reminders to check for available benefits. Most important, in my opinion: "Don't wait until you're facing an urgent situation." Very informative and helpful.

      • justthemessenger profile image

        James C Moore 

        4 weeks ago from The Great Midwest

        Flourish

        I noticed that you advise employees to check their state laws on the issue. Actually, the National Conference of State Legislatures, NCSL, is a great reference for state laws by subject.all subjects. In this case family and medical leave laws are listed by state on their web site.

      • heidithorne profile image

        Heidi Thorne 

        4 weeks ago from Chicago Area

        Thank goodness that both employees and employers are becoming more aware of mental health issues! Now we can have more productive conversations and solutions.

        But it's still tricky business with all the details of qualifying, getting approval, etc. Maybe one day it will be on the same level as a broken arm.

        Thanks for sharing this important information and encouragement!

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Linda - I'm sorry you faced that situation and didn't have the option. I am often asked about this question so I felt it was finally time to write an article about it. I hope it helps the stressed out workers who are looking for options.

      • Carb Diva profile image

        Linda Lum 

        4 weeks ago from Washington State, USA

        Flourish, this is so very well written. I thank God that I'm no longer in this midst of that turmoil. I didn't have those options 20 years ago and resorted to taking an early retirement, a decision I've never regretted even though it reduced my annuity.

        What you have outlined here will be immeasurably valuable for so many people. I hope it goes viral.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Mary - Sometimes we place too much importance on a job. Health first. Without health and family, there's nothing.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Peggy - Thanks for reading. I hope it helps people who need it.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Eric - Thank you. I know right? We can't all be soothers and sweet talkers. Some of our jobs involve auditing, compliance, policing, and other unfun stuff that can stress others out.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Kaili - Sounds like your employer is truly tuned into employees' psychological needs. That's great to hear of a company that delivers in such ways.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Pamela - I worry about people who do not have access to family and medical leave and short-term disability but need it for whatever reason. It's a tough world we live in sometimes.

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Bill - The feeling is priceless, isn't it?

      • aesta1 profile image

        Mary Norton 

        4 weeks ago from Ontario, Canada

        A friend of mine took a leave due to PTSD and I found her happier and more able to recover from her loss. It is important to take care of one's self first and you have explained thoroughly how t go about it.

      • Peggy W profile image

        Peggy Woods 

        4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

        This is important information to know for those who might otherwise not be able to keep working. It is good that more companies are giving longer lengths of time for maternal leave, etc. Most people who are stressed out probably use their sick days, assuming they have paid sick days. Thanks for writing about this topic. Stress seems to be ratcheting up for many reasons these days.

      • Ericdierker profile image

        Eric Dierker 

        4 weeks ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

        Wow this is really well done.

        I reading along here and realize for some time my work required me to stress people out.

      • Kaili Bisson profile image

        Kaili Bisson 

        4 weeks ago from Canada

        Hi Flourish,

        Great article, very informative. Some industries seem to recognize that burnout and stress come with the job, and I often see companies here being more proactive about helping employees head stress off at the pass, before it becomes unmanageable and more expensive to deal with. The company I work for has "masssage days" when you can sign up for a quick neck and head massage. They also have designated folks in every group who are there just to listen when someone needs to talk. Other things like allowing people to work from home more, which is huge when kids get sick.

      • Pamela99 profile image

        Pamela Oglesby 

        4 weeks ago from Sunny Florida

        This is a very informative article for those working under too much stress. I hope there are more short-term disability insurance plans now than when I was working. I know no income would be a huge problem for some people. I did not know the statistics were so high for mental illness, and that is a bit frightening. You supplied some great information in this article.

      • billybuc profile image

        Bill Holland 

        4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

        Great suggestions...love the message....love, more, the fact that I work for myself. :)

      • FlourishAnyway profile imageAUTHOR

        FlourishAnyway 

        4 weeks ago from USA

        Liz - I wish people who want to socialize medicine could hear the true experience of Britons regarding the NHS that it's not all roses and ponies. In this regard, I want the best medicine my money can buy. Stress abounds in western society. You're right.

      • Eurofile profile image

        Liz Westwood 

        4 weeks ago from UK

        Although the processes are slightly different in the UK, thanks to the NHS, we have an ongoing issue with stress. As life has become more pressurised in western society, stress levels have risen and many have to take time off work as a result. Stress-induced illness is on the rise. Your article tackles the issue in a helpful and informative way.

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