So You Think You Want to Be a Manager? 10 Reasons to Love the Job You're In - ToughNickel - Money
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So You Think You Want to Be a Manager? 10 Reasons to Love the Job You're In

FlourishAnyway is an Industrial/Organizational Psychologist with applied experience in corporate human resources and consulting.

Is a job in management a wise move for you? Don't undervalue your role as a technical specialist or independent contributor. Many people assume the only way to fulfill their career aspirations is through management.

Is a job in management a wise move for you? Don't undervalue your role as a technical specialist or independent contributor. Many people assume the only way to fulfill their career aspirations is through management.

Pursuing a Career in Management: Just Because You Can Doesn't Mean You Should

If you're really good at your job—and perhaps even if you're not—chances are that one day you'll look at your boss and think, "I could do his job." And you'll probably be right.

From the outside looking in, becoming a manager may seem like the next natural progression in your career. It can bring higher pay, more authority, maybe even an office of your own. But that's not all it brings.

Management isn't for everyone.  Don't undervalue the professional contributions you already make as an individual contributor and team member.

Management isn't for everyone. Don't undervalue the professional contributions you already make as an individual contributor and team member.

Be Careful What You Wish For

If you find yourself wanting to be the boss, there's an old maxim you first need to consider: "Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it." That's because the job of a manager is not for everyone. Don't say nobody ever told you.

Independent contributors and technical specialists—that's "regular employees" to you and me—can have important and fulfilling careers as non-managers. So don't be too quick to undervalue the professional contributions you already make. Don't downplay the benefits of being a solid team member.

Before you throw your hat in the ring for a management position, determine if that's what you truly want. Here are 10 things to appreciate about the job you're already in.

Managers must encourage the dispirited, the all-stars, and the utterly average. They try to curb the egos of the overconfident and must deal with both office divas and problem performers. You, however, have the latitude to focus on yourself.

Managers must encourage the dispirited, the all-stars, and the utterly average. They try to curb the egos of the overconfident and must deal with both office divas and problem performers. You, however, have the latitude to focus on yourself.

Reader Poll

Reason 1: You Can Focus on Motivating and Developing Yourself

As a non-manager, you can concentrate on motivating and developing you ... and only you. You control the attitude you bring to work, the professional quality you put into your work, and how often you decide to seek feedback.

Managers, however, must attempt to motivate and develop a variety of employees, including

  • the snarky and cynical subordinate
  • the arrogant know-it-all
  • those with perpetually low self-confidence
  • the barely average contributor
  • the superstars and office divas
  • and the problem performers.

Understandably, trying to coach such a wide range of characters can feel like herding cats. Fun if you like that kind of thing, but otherwise not so much.

Yay! Go you! "Rah, rah ree!  Let's hear it for me!"  As a non-manager you don't have to defend upper management's ill-advised decisions or listen to grumbling from the troops.

Yay! Go you! "Rah, rah ree! Let's hear it for me!" As a non-manager you don't have to defend upper management's ill-advised decisions or listen to grumbling from the troops.

Reason 2: Being a Company Cheerleader Isn't Part of Your Job Description

Let's say you tend to call things as you see them and have no use for "spin." Let's say you like to listen ... but only to a point. If this is true, then you might already be sitting in a plush spot as a non-manager.

If you were in management, however, you'd be expected to serve as a buffer between executive decision makers and grumbling troops. You'd need to listen to your team's concerns and try to sell your people on how well-informed and necessary the decision is.

Managers serve as company cheerleaders no matter how asinine a policy or program might seem. They must seek buy-in and demonstrate that they personally believe what they're saying. They also must enforce rules they don't personally agree with.

Managers are the ones still cheering when the home team is getting its butt kicked, it's snowing like crazy, and the crowd is groaning. That's what they do. (Ask yourself: Is that what you want to do?)

If you dislike interruptions, stay out of management.  Managers often have to pretend that the only dumb question is the one that wasn't asked (again and again).

If you dislike interruptions, stay out of management. Managers often have to pretend that the only dumb question is the one that wasn't asked (again and again).

Reason 3: You Can Do Your Job With Fewer Interruptions

Interruptions are costly. All those questions, brief status updates, and requests for assistance chip away at personal productivity.

If you're a non-manager, however, chances are that you deal with a lot fewer of them. What's not to love about that?

Did You Know?

  • Next time you see someone knocking on management's door claiming "this will only take a minute," you'll know better. That's because on average, it takes people 23 minutes following an interruption to return to the task they were doing.1
  • Managers are interrupted more often than non-managers because they generally interact with a more extensive network of people. In addition, the larger a manager's staff, the more he or she tends to be interrupted.2
  • Such a lack of focus is terribly ineffective. Studies show that multi-tasking is actually task-switching. Because the human brain can efficiently process only one task at a time, multi-tasking hinders our ability to learn new information and makes us feel more stressed. When multi-tasking, we also become more distracted by irrelevant information.3

Think about the impact of all those distractions when you see your co-workers lining up at your manager's door. Then smile because you have another reason to love the job you're in.

If you're uncomfortable with conflict, stay out of management.  Managers routinely need to tell people "no," assign unpleasant work assignments, and issue corrective action.

If you're uncomfortable with conflict, stay out of management. Managers routinely need to tell people "no," assign unpleasant work assignments, and issue corrective action.

Reason 4: You Don't Need to Make All Those Unpopular Decisions

Managers have to make and communicate decisions that often disappoint, upset, or anger others. For example:

  • not hiring an employee's friend
  • scheduling staff to work holidays
  • doling out unfavorable work assignments or additional work duties and
  • rewarding performance with an annual pay raise of 2% (or none at all).

The boss also must deal with the resulting pushback.

If telling people "no" is not your thing, celebrate the fact that someone else must face people's venting instead of you.

You don't have to referee other people's conflicts.  (But it can sometimes be interesting to watch from the sidelines.)  Managers, however, are often obligated to step in.

You don't have to referee other people's conflicts. (But it can sometimes be interesting to watch from the sidelines.) Managers, however, are often obligated to step in.

Reason 5: You Can Choose Not to Get Involved in Office Conflicts

Every work group has its conflicts, often involving personality clashes, resource disagreements, or the need for clearer accountabilities. When there are too many "I"s in "team," managers are called on to referee, whether they like it or not.

As a non-manager, however, you can choose not to get involved in other people's conflicts. Now that's a stress reliever as well as a time-saver!

If you dislike being the bad guy, stay out of management.  Managers have to tell people when they suck at their jobs.

If you dislike being the bad guy, stay out of management. Managers have to tell people when they suck at their jobs.

Reason 6: You Don't Have to Tell People They're Not Performing Their Job

Do you hate playing the "bad guy?" If so, you'll love the fact that you don't have the task of telling people when they truly suck at their jobs.

Managers often dread delivering annual performance reviews, but these tasks aren't fun either:

  • issuing verbal reprimands when workers come in late, take long lunches, or do not ask for appropriate approval
  • delivering formal discipline when employees violate company rules or policies
  • formulating performance improvement plans ("get well plans")
  • firing or downsizing employees and
  • defending decisions to Human Resources or government agencies when workers complain.
Managers often don't receive transparent feedback from employees.  Communication is more distant.  Thus, being a manager can be like walking around with your fly unzipped—others notice but few people will come right out and tell you.

Managers often don't receive transparent feedback from employees. Communication is more distant. Thus, being a manager can be like walking around with your fly unzipped—others notice but few people will come right out and tell you.

Reason 7: You Get More Genuine Two-Way Communication With Coworkers

Have you ever walked up to a group of people and they suddenly stopped talking? That happens when you're the boss, as there's an invisible social veil dividing management from those being managed.

Managers control workers' rewards, punishments, and working conditions so they aren't as likely to receive transparent feedback about themselves. It can be like walking around with your fly unzipped—others surely notice, but few have the gumption to come right out and tell you. Underlings also tend to be less casual with their humor and language around the boss.

As a non-manager, however, you enjoy communication with your co-workers that is more raw and authentic. You won't need to wonder whether your co-workers consider you funny, smart, an idea thief, or an annoying jackwagon. They'll quickly let you know. What's not to love about honest, authentic communication?

Managers are sandwiched between employees and executives. Their behavior, moods, and motives are ever-scrutinized.

Managers are sandwiched between employees and executives. Their behavior, moods, and motives are ever-scrutinized.

Reason 8: Your Behavior Is Probably Less Scrutinized

There's an old saying that "Employees join companies but leave managers." Everybody's watching the manager, who is sandwiched between the team he manages and multiple layers of executives.

With greater visibility in the organization, the boss is obligated to lead by example. Therefore, his behavior receives greater scrutiny.

Subordinates watch for signs of the boss' moods and take note of any off-handed comments. They assign meaning to their manager's preferences and second-guess his decisions.

At the same time, executives expect the manager to be super-available. They require that he run his department under a "do more with less" strategy. (And then when problems arise with turnover, quality, and productivity, they express genuine surprise, followed by "fix it" directives.)

However, as a non-manager, you can probably slip by more easily with an occasional bad day. You can make a remark without having others dissect its hidden meaning. You can mind your own business and have others mind theirs. Sometimes being less visible is best!

Friends don't let friends work in a job they don't enjoy.  Friends encourage one another to either love the job they're in or find something better.

Friends don't let friends work in a job they don't enjoy. Friends encourage one another to either love the job they're in or find something better.

Reason 9: You Can Be Friends With Whomever You Want

As a non-manager, you enjoy greater latitude to form relationships with whomever you want. That's not necessarily so with managers.

One of the toughest challenges of becoming a manager can be establishing professional boundaries with employees you manage, especially when your subordinates used to be your fellow teammates and friends. Managers must be mindful of perceptions of favoritism—both voiced and whispered. Typically, they must also abide by company guidelines that prohibit bosses from dating those in their chain of command.

Becoming the boss involves a voluntary trade of increased restrictions on personal relationships and how you spend your time in exchange for additional income and organizational authority. If this is not a tradeoff you want to make, then it's a good reason to love the job you're in!

If you love details rather than "big picture thinking," consider whether you would rather  be a subject matter expert.  You don't need to be a manager to be successful or happy.

If you love details rather than "big picture thinking," consider whether you would rather be a subject matter expert. You don't need to be a manager to be successful or happy.

Reason 10: You Can Develop Subject Matter Expertise Diving Into the Details

In a sense, there are two kinds of people—people who prefer "big picture thinking" and those who like to wade waist deep into the details then roll around there.

Not everyone has the patience, focus, or ability to become an authority in their knowledge area. Managers' focus is on the wider picture. They get work done through others. With a wider organizational reach, they must coordinate so many competing priorities that they usually cannot afford to dwell on specifics. (That's what delegation is for.)

For independent contributors, it's a different story. You can become a subject matter expert (SME) by following your specific area of interest to the far reaches of professional knowledge. You can become the respected "go-to" person on a given subject while developing a strong sense of ownership in your work.

And because of the good ol' laws of supply and demand, oftentimes you can get paid decently to do what you already enjoy. That's definitely worth loving!

Whether you're a technical expert, a consultant, or a creative, you don't need to be a manager to succeed or be happy. And you don't need to be the boss to be a leader.

Ready for your career in management?

Ready for your career in management?

7 Signs You'll Enjoy a Career in Management

You may enjoy management if . . .

1. You neither avoid interpersonal conflict nor behave like you have something to prove.

2. You don't mind interruptions.

3. You enjoy engaging others and providing them with needed direction, support, and advice.

4. Even if you do not personally agree with them, your don't shy away from enforcing rules or policies.

5. You communicate succinctly. You're good at explaining to a variety of audiences.

6. You can persuade others and motivate them to action.

7. You're a "big picture" rather than a detail-oriented thinker.

Still Want to Be a Manager? Here Are 5 Must-Haves

Notes

1Pattison, K. (2008, July 28). Worker, Interrupted: The Cost of Task Switching. Retrieved from http://www.fastcompany.com/944128/worker-interrupted-cost-task-switching

2Gallup. (2006, June 8). Too Many Interruptions at Work? Retrieved from http://businessjournal.gallup.com/content/23146/too-many-interruptions-work.aspx.

3Grohol, J. M. (2009). Can You Multitask? Probably Not Well. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2009/08/27/can-you-multitask-probably-not-well/.

This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. Content is for informational or entertainment purposes only and does not substitute for personal counsel or professional advice in business, financial, legal, or technical matters.

© 2014 FlourishAnyway

Comments

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on March 27, 2018:

Morris Alex Sackor - Best of luck on your management aspirations. At least you know what you're in for. Keep in mind that management and leadership are different and you can lead in many ways.

Morris Alex Sackor on March 26, 2018:

Sound read! Thanks for provding free education for us readers! Actually I dream of being a manager because I like playing leadership role. Now I know why there's always confusion among managers and the managed!

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on June 11, 2016:

Rajan - You and me, both! It's a case of be careful what you ask for. I know so many people who aspire for the title only to regret it once they're in the hot seat.

Rajan Singh Jolly from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on June 10, 2016:

This read reminded me of the days when I was a manager. It is a tough job for sure. I'd rather be a worker. It's much less stressful.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on January 02, 2015:

vespawoolf - I appreciate your reading and taking the time to leave a comment. I hope your new year is a successful and happy one.

Vespa Woolf from Peru, South America on January 02, 2015:

This was very interesting and gives him a window into my husband´s responsibilities. He definitely fits the points under "signs that you might enjoy management" box. Thank you for sharing.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on November 04, 2014:

annanee - Be careful what you wish for ... . Thanks so much for reading and taking the time to comment. Have a terrific week.

annanee from USA on November 04, 2014:

Unfortunately, too many of us go for what makes money instead of what we like. But money comes at a cost. You pointed it out very well!

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 20, 2014:

Better Yourself - I absolutely agree. Life is too short to be unhappy, either in your work life or outside of it. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Better Yourself from North Carolina on July 20, 2014:

Excellent hub and excellent points made! This will probably make people think twice about what they actually want, its easy to get excited about more money and a fancier title but moving up is more work, more responsibility - of people and projects, more of everything that in the end might not make you happy. We aren't meant to be unhappy with our work!

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 18, 2014:

Audrey - I'm not sure it's worth all the extra you have to put into the job. But for some people it's livin' the dream.

Audrey Howitt from California on July 18, 2014:

Really an excellent article! I am not sure that I would ever want that must responsibility !!

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 13, 2014:

Suzanne - I like my alone time as well. You have to know yourself. Thanks for voting, reading, and pinning. Have a great week.

Suzanne Day from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on July 13, 2014:

Good managers seem to be extremely skilled at getting along with all people. They do all of the other stuff too, but the ones that can get the team onside in the face of horrible economic conditions are the ones for the job. Also, the managers I see have massive interruptions to their day and do not complain....EVER! This is why I could never be a manager - I hate interruptions! Voted interesting, up and pinned ;)

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 11, 2014:

Dora - Having been in HR (and managed others), I've encountered many individuals who yearned to be managers only to discover that it wasn't what they really wanted or expected after all. It's better to go in with your eyes wide open. Thanks for reading, commenting, and voting. Have a wonderful weekend.

Dora Weithers from The Caribbean on July 10, 2014:

Excellent, practical, eye-opener on who should, who could and who ought not to be managers. You laid it out in a way that both the managers and the managed could appreciate. Quite an education in interpersonal skills. Voted Up!

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 10, 2014:

Pamela - It sounds like you are a kind and decent person. Scoundrels and bitter people abound in the business world. I am glad you found happiness rather than letting them either beat you down or make you one of their kind. Stay happy.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 10, 2014:

Liz - Between the refereeing and the performance management, it just doesn't give some folks the warm fizzles, no matter how good they are at it. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Elizabeth Parker from Las Vegas, NV on July 10, 2014:

I've been a manager in the past when I thought that's what I wanted to be, however, I'm much happier not having that responsibility. Hard work is fine, but trying to manage others isn't my thing. :)

howtopam from Alberta, Canada on July 10, 2014:

Very true!

I always enjoyed taking charge of situations since I was a child so being a leader in the workforce was my destiny. However, In management I some found the political game forcing me to sacrifice my integrity which I was unable to do. In board meeting I was often reprimanded by other department managers for speaking my mind openly on sensitive issues, making people uncomfortable. I left the corporate employment because I felt that I was not free to exercise my thoughts and ideas.

I became a consultant and found the freedom that I was looking for. As a consultant I had the freedom to speak my mind. Probably because I was not considered to be in the tightly knit management group. However, I was often brought into a corporation to do the unpleasant tasks that other salaried managers did not want - like mass layoffs. They at one time in my consulting career named me the "axe woman". I actually grew tired of firing people because managers did not desire to make enemies amongst their staff members so I retired early. Now I live a peaceful life of solitude and have few friends because I laid off or fired everyone that I have ever met.

Pamela

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 09, 2014:

WriterJanis - Yes, it does. Thanks for reading and commenting! Have a great rest-of-the-week!

Janis from California on July 09, 2014:

How nice to read a realistic approach to management. Sure, it has its perks, but it also comes with so much responsibility.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 09, 2014:

Peg - Managing people isn't all it's cracked up to be, as you unfortunately discovered. People often glorify it then find themselves surprised. I'm glad you found a way out of all the stress you faced so that you can now enjoy your life better.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 09, 2014:

Jo - Managing is definitely a skillset all its own. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Peg Cole from Northeast of Dallas, Texas on July 09, 2014:

These 10 reasons are spot on. After my promotion at a large corporation, I felt isolated and truly alienated. Doing performance reviews of my former peers was quite painful. One of the driving factors for me to apply for the role of management was in response to a coworker who told me, "If I get this job, I'll have you doing your job and mine as well." Then he laughed, but he was serious. I knew, having worked with this individual for five years, that he would make good on his statement. We both were considered for the position and I ended up with the job and a lot of migraine headaches.

I like what you've said, in particular, "Managers serve as company cheerleaders no matter how asinine a policy or program might seem. They must seek buy-in and demonstrate that they personally believe what they're saying. They also must enforce rules they don't personally agree with."

This is incredibly true and the basis for much stress while serving as a manager.

Jo Alexis-Hagues from Lincolnshire, U.K on July 09, 2014:

Some people seem to be born leaders, they relish being a manager, I do it when I have to, but I'd rather be left to get on with the work. Another great article, loved the images.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 08, 2014:

Tolovaj - One place I worked even referred to the "one neck" philosophy -- that is if anything went wrong the big wig wanted one neck to chop, ring, or what have you. Not worth the meager difference in pay.

Tolovaj on July 08, 2014:

Great list of reasons. I was never part of management in any company where I worked and I never wanted to be. Independence and responsibility - yes, but being responsible for other people's mistakes - not for me, thanks.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 07, 2014:

Carrie - It's not always an undesirable place to be in ranks. Glad you enjoyed this. Thanks for stopping by!

Carrie Lee Night from Northeast United States on July 07, 2014:

Voted interesting and awesome :). I loved this hub :). Great topic and truthful down to earth advice :) thanks for sharing.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 07, 2014:

Anna - Thanks for stopping by. I hope you're able to get back into managing adults after you're done managing little ones at home. Have a great week!

Anna Haven from Scotland on July 07, 2014:

I was a senior manager until I had children, then I left to stay home and look after them, whilst working part time at a different non management job. So I have tried both roles.

I much prefer management and hopefully will get back to it.

Your hub sums up the pros and cons really well and I like how you always manages to mix in just the right amount of humour as well. :)

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 06, 2014:

livingsta - I appreciate your comment and share. Thanks for stopping by.

livingsta from United Kingdom on July 06, 2014:

I totally agree with the points for not wanting to be a manager as I can relate to most of these at work. Thank you for sharing this with us in a very interesting way. Voted up and sharing.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

OldRoses - Very well put. I have seen that and wondered why they even needed a manager if people are going to skip them to go to the next level anyway. Thanks for the feedback and comment.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

Kathleen - Companies often have terrible management training programs. They may teach the technical stuff but it is often a matter of poof you're in charge of people, go lead. I think that is why there is such a booming industry in management and leadership how-to books.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

ologsinquito - We always seem to focus on moving up but rarely seem to focus on the flip side -- staying put in a job you're good at and enjoy. Thanks for reading, commenting, voting, and sharing.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

Lady_E - Thanks for stopping by and for letting me know so I can thank Sunshine625.

ologsinquito from USA on July 05, 2014:

This is absolutely excellent. There are many benefits to not moving into management, as you just pointed out. It is very difficult when someone is promoted from within, because, suddenly, they are supervising their friends. Voted up, shared and pinned to my work and business board.

Kathleen Cochran from Atlanta, Georgia on July 05, 2014:

The problem with most managerial jobs is that the company doesn't train you to manage. You are good at what you do and get promoted. Hocu-Pocus: You're a Manager, which is a whole other thing than just being good at what you do. When I managed a staff, most of what I knew about leadership I'd learned watching my husband's military career.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

Sunshine625 - Thanks for stopping by to read, comment and tweet. Have a great weekend!

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

Heidi - I like your description "technician.". So many people wind up in management because that is where they think they should be, the next natural step because the only way to be happy is to move up. However, a job that doesn't feel right will wear you down and create stress on others as well -- namely, the poor people one has to manage. Thanks for commenting and sharing.

Caren White on July 05, 2014:

I was a manager for about 5 years and not only did I experience everything you listed, I also was constantly undermined by my own manager. Whenever I made a decision or created a policy that one of my employees didn't like, they would just go over my head to my manager who always over-ruled me. It was so frustrating. Great, great hub.

Elena from London, UK on July 05, 2014:

Very inspiring, Thanks. Sunshine625 tweeted this for you on Twitter.

Linda Bilyeu from Orlando, FL on July 05, 2014:

I've never had a desire to be in management, but I've been a leader who leads and doesn't boss people around. Managers who are bossy, I don't care for. Managers who lead a team, I appreciate.

Heidi Thorne from Chicago Area on July 05, 2014:

Oh my! I couldn't have said all this better myself. I have seen so many non-manager types (what I call "technicians") crash and burn once they become management. Management IS stressful!

My husband was a pretty good manager of a department once he moved up the ranks. But it was a never ending job! He was always handling hiring, planning, employee problems and his own work almost 24/7. Now that he's out of management in another job after his department was downsized, he can take better care of himself.

The same scenario happens when genuine employee types think they run their own company. That is actually a worse recipe for disaster. These entrepreneur wannabes need to read this post.

BTW, Influencer is one of my favorite books on management. Another great post. Voted up and sharing. Have a great July 4th holiday weekend!

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

JoanCA - Even introverts can be managers, but it does take "emotional labor" that you may not want to expend. Thanks for reading and commenting.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

Arun - Those who have the desire to manage people should definitely pursue the goal. Thanks for reading and commenting!

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

CyberShelley - Thanks for reading and commenting. Hope your weekend has been a terrific one so far.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

Tori - It is nice not having to approve vacations, time cards, settle disputes, etc. Just "staying in your lane" and worrying about yourself is work enough for most people. Thanks for reading and commenting.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

sujaya - I'm sure you have a point there. There are multiple paths to power, however. Expertise (rather than title) is a valuable path. Have a great weekend.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

Susan - That is a good reason to stay put. Everyone is watching the manager and everyone has an opinion. Have a great holiday weekend.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 05, 2014:

Bill - I find so often that people who claim a "30,000 foot view" just don't have the mental substance to connect any dots at any level. There are always exceptions. Have a great weekend.

JoanCA on July 05, 2014:

I'm an introvert, so I could never be a manager. My husband and I own a small business but I let him take care of all the employee related stuff.

ARUN KANTI CHATTERJEE from KOLKATA on July 05, 2014:

As a manager one has the duty to lead, supervise, motivate and mentor others - and the ability to do so goes a long way to make the difference to a company's overall success. But unfortunately maximum men and women turn out to be good workers instead of good managers since they lack the quality to manage affairs effectively. Thanks for an excellent hub well written.

Shelley Watson on July 05, 2014:

I enjoyed managing people, there was a lot of satisfaction in helping people to grow and become more than they thought they could be. When you are a manager you are in a position to make it happen for them and open the right doors. Thank you for sharing.

Tori Canonge from North Carolina on July 05, 2014:

There has only been one time that I was a supervisor and it was for a summer day camp. Even then the parents were ruthless sometimes and the volunteers that were on my team weren't always reliable, so it was difficult. I like the position I'm in now... I don't have to worry about anyone but myself and I'm good with that.

sujaya venkatesh on July 05, 2014:

nice to rule than to be ruled

Susan Hambidge from Kent, England on July 05, 2014:

I couldn't be a manager - my filter between brain and mouth has way too many holes in it - I'd blurt something out and upset too many people. As a minion I mostly get away with it! Nice piece - love the kangaroo boxing image!

Bill De Giulio from Massachusetts on July 05, 2014:

Hi Flourish. I have always preferred to be a worker and not a manager. I never really thought about reasons why, but your list points out a number of reasons that certainly hit home with me. I guess I just prefer to be responsible for "me" and not others. Also, I do find that I am a detail person as opposed to the big picture. Great hub, certainly everyone can't be the boss as someone has to do the work. Hope you're have a nice holiday weekend.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 04, 2014:

Frank - I love your comment. Have a great holiday weekend, my super sleuthing awesome writer friend.

Frank Atanacio from Shelton on July 04, 2014:

I can understand the manager's position, and the worker's... some managers need a good assistant.. so the manager can have a easy go at it.. Well I don't know what Im talking about cuz I never been a manager..:( LOL

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 04, 2014:

AliciaC - Thanks for reading and commenting. Managing people is certainly not for everyone. Not my cup of tea. Have a great weekend.

Linda Crampton from British Columbia, Canada on July 04, 2014:

I have never had a desire to be a manager for many of the reasons that you describe! This is a useful hub that should be helpful for a lot of people, Flourish.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 04, 2014:

Rachael - I agree it's important to get it out of your system, and if becoming the boss is what it takes, then so be it. You never know; you might be really good at it and unexpectedly love it. Have a great July Fourth weekend!

Rachael O'Halloran from United States on July 04, 2014:

I think everyone goes through a phase where they think they can do a job better than their boss. As you point out, not everyone is cut out for the job. But I think those who want to be a boss should try it once, get it out of their system and then leave it up to those who want to live and breathe "the job." Me? I like my life just fine being an underling. I work my 8 hours, clock out, go home and leave the job behind at the time clock.

I hope you are enjoying this wonderful holiday :)

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 04, 2014:

Sha - Glad you enjoy your decision. It's good to reinvent yourself every few years.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 04, 2014:

justthemessenger - Absolutely! Just because you can play doesn't mean you should coach. Two totally different skillsets. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Shauna L Bowling from Central Florida on July 04, 2014:

Flourish, I was Accounting Manager when I quit the work force. I was a loyal employee for over 12 years. When my input as a manager wasn't respected or taken into consideration, I lost my love for the family operated company I worked for. That was enough for me to jump off the corporate ladder and jump into the unknown waters of working for myself. I'm still struggling, but I don't regret my decision in the least.

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 04, 2014:

Faith Reaper - Being out in front managing people may be great for some but it's not always the rewarding adventure of leading others that it's portrayed as. Have a fabulous Fourth!

James C Moore from The Great Midwest on July 04, 2014:

The only company that I would want to manage is my one man band sole proprietorship. Too often we think the excellent athlete will make for a good coach or the superior assistant coach is head coach material. It's not that way.

Faith Reaper from southern USA on July 04, 2014:

I like being in the trenches with the other pee-ons : ) Excellent reasons you have shared here, Flourish, as to loving the job we're in for sure ...

Have a great Fourth!!!

Blessings always

FlourishAnyway (author) from USA on July 04, 2014:

Bill - I've been both and prefer to do my own thing, too. Happy Holiday weekend to you as well!

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on July 04, 2014:

I have been a manager and I didn't like it. I prefer being one of the worker bees....but that's just me. :) Happy 4th of July my friend.

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