How to Deal With Job Resentment the Right Way

Updated on February 27, 2018
Kaitlyn Lo profile image

Kaitlyn has a background in psychology and writes articles that teach you how to lean on your body, mind, heart, and on those around you.

Job Burnout Is All About Resentment

Burnout isn’t just about working too much. There are many many of us who work very long hours and are some of the most fulfilled, motivated people you’ll ever meet. Instead, burnout is often caused by an adverse emotion that comes from working too much under certain restricting circumstances.

When you feel like you’re working long hours without getting any closer to something you desperately want, resentment towards your job will grow and become the driving force to feeling burnt out.

What Is Burnout?

According to the American Psychological Association, job burnout is a long period where a person feels exhausted, lacks interest in things, and experiences a downward trend in job performance.

Chronic stress is often the cause of burnout because you’re put in an environment where you’re asked to fulfill expectations or tasks that are beyond your capacity. In essence, you’ve run out of emotional and mental resources to handle what your job requires of you.

Burnout can harm your health (both physical and mental), relationships, sense of well-being, and career. Studies have found that the frontal cortex in brains of people suffering from burnout will thin faster than those without burnout. The frontal cortex thins naturally as we age, but burnout sufferers have thinner frontal cortices than other people their age. Another study of 9,000 employees found that people suffering from burnout are at significantly higher risk of heart disease.

It’s important to identify when you’re feeling burnt out, and know what you can do about it.

Major Symptoms of Burnout

By energepic.com. CC0 Creative Commons.
By energepic.com. CC0 Creative Commons. | Source

1. Failing to take care of yourself
It’s common for those of us suffering from burnout to self-medicate, drink too much, smoke too much, or not bother to exercise and eat healthily. We may find it hard to sleep properly as well.

2. You feel like you’re working when you’re not.
You’re always thinking, worrying, or stressing about work even when you’re not at the office, so you can't decompress fully before heading back to work the next day.

3. Tired. All. The. Time.
You’re exhausted and drained emotionally, mentally, and physically. When you’re burnt out, you just don’t seem to have the energy for anything.

4. Not motivated
You find it hard to get out of bed in the morning, drag your feet when you are at work, and your drive is gone. As a result, your job performance plummets, and you find it hard to feel enthusiastic about anything.

5. Feeling pessimistic, cynical, and frustrated
You feel like what you do doesn’t matter anymore and won’t be recognized no matter what. You feel stuck, pessimistic about everything, and hopeless. While it’s normal to feel negative emotions on the job at times, when the negative dominates the positive, that’s when burnout becomes more likely.

Poll: Job Happiness

How happy are you with your job?

See results

How to Deal With Resentment at Work

By rawpixel.com. CC0 Creative Commons.
By rawpixel.com. CC0 Creative Commons. | Source

Since job resentment is the main cause of burnout and stress, what can we do about it?

1. Change your perspective.
When resentment takes over, it’s easy to start obsessing over it day in day out. This is when you need to shift your perspective. Disappointment, hurt, and even betrayal is part of life. Feeling jealous of your colleagues’ success is normal, but there’s no point in envy when you’re not doing anything to change your situation. Take any setbacks as a sign to change course so you can keep moving forward.

2. Know what’s real and what’s imagined.
When you’re feeling resentful, your circumstances can seem exaggerated: the bad seems much worse, and your worse case scenario much more likely. So the first thing you need to do is to separate fact from fiction to understand how legitimate your frustrations are.

  • Do you feel victimized? Are you sure you have no control over the situation?
  • Do you feel helpless? Are you sure that no matter what you do, nothing is going to make your situation better?
  • Do you feel like everyone is the bad guy? Are you sure you’re not exaggerating or over-imagining evil intentions?

Once you’ve identified what's going on and the role you play in the situation, you’ll feel more empowered to make things better for yourself.

3. Do the things you love.
Resentment often results from not being able to do the things that are important to us. If your job stands in the way of achieving your life goals or stops you from working towards your dream, we'll naturally feel resentful towards it.

But that doesn’t necessarily mean you need to quit your job. Even though you’re drained after work, it’s important that you schedule activities you enjoy when you’re not working. When you’re having fun and doing things that make you feel fulfilled, your problems at work just won’t seem as soul-sucking anymore.

More Tips to Help You Deal With Negative Emotions

By Pixabay. CC0 Creative Commons.
By Pixabay. CC0 Creative Commons. | Source

There are a few other things you can do to help you work through your feelings of bitterness and frustration.

Journal. Talk it out with people who care about you. Even working out your frustrations at the gym will make you feel better. The important thing is not to let your resentment build and fester.

When we learn how to recognize, own, control, and take responsibility for our emotions, that’s when we can make firm steps to take control of your life at work and reach the level of career success you've always dreamed of.

Poll: Fulfillment at Work

Does your company provide opportunities to help you feel more fulfilled at work?

See results

Questions & Answers

    © 2018 KV Lo

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • Kaitlyn Lo profile image
        Author

        KV Lo 7 weeks ago

        @Karen Ngai: I'm glad you think so! It's important to take a step back regularly so as not to get too caught up in the chase for greater success at the expense of our mental and physical health. :)

      • profile image

        Amanda 2 months ago

        I can definitely relate to some of these feelings right now! I needed this post before I imploded haha. Very useful tips, thank you for this post

      • profile image

        Jen 2 months ago

        This really resonates with me right now. The effects of burnout are scary, but that makes the tips that much more important!

      • profile image

        RAWLINGS SUNDAY 2 months ago

        Being in charge of your emotions help you manage resentment and being able to put one's self together. Burnt do affect big time, destabilising most area of one's life. Great post here.

      • profile image

        Stephanie 2 months ago

        Just sent this to my hubby! He could do with reading this

      • profile image

        Aditi 2 months ago

        This is such a great article for anyone who is going through a rough patch at work, offering so many tips on how to get things going. Burnouts are never easy and can affect your performance to a great extent.

      • profile image

        Karen Ngai 2 months ago

        This is an article with some pretty important takeaway messages. For a person who has just started working it is something that can get forgotten due to stress or just comparison to others.

      • profile image

        CelestialPurposed 2 months ago

        So true, burnout can be tough to overcome. but, once you recognize it, then we can overcome it. Just by remembering to LiveFree and LoveOnPurpose.

      • profile image

        Jennifer Prince 2 months ago

        I've had this before. It's so hard to stay, and I love your ideas on dealing with it. Great thoughts!

      • profile image

        Erica 2 months ago

        I always say that when you're down and feeling defeated you need to give yourself a check up from the neck up. It's in your head as in the way you view the situation.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, toughnickel.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://toughnickel.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)