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15 Ways To Know When It's Time To Quit Your Job

Updated on October 1, 2016
FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway is an Industrial/Organizational Psychologist with applied experience in corporate human resources and consulting.

Stuck In A Job Going Nowhere Fast?

Know when it's time to move on from your current job and find other employment.  Work shouldn't have to be soul-crushing.  Find a solution, a better position.
Know when it's time to move on from your current job and find other employment. Work shouldn't have to be soul-crushing. Find a solution, a better position. | Source

Reader Poll

How long have you been unhappy in a job before actually quitting?

See results

How To Know When It's Time To Move On

You may pride yourself like I do in the fact that you're no quitter. But let's face it: when it comes to work, sometimes you have to be.

You outgrow a job. A better situation comes along. The job isn't what you believed it to be. You no longer fit the company culture.

The truth is that there's no real prize for stamina, especially if you become bitter and burned out by a job you detest. You do not—I repeat, do not—have to suffer years of soul-crushing unhappiness at a dead end job saying, "Yes, sir" to a jerk you can't stand. Don't let it get that far.

You can find other work, you know. As an adult, you can give yourself permission to quit. (Although it's best to have a plan.)

Having been in HR with two Fortune 500 companies, I've seen employees of all levels quit for good reasons, terrible reasons, and occasionally for little obvious reason at all. But how should an employee know when they've had enough?

Field of Dreams?

Where do you see yourself in the next 2-5 years?  If you'd never want your boss' position, it may be time to re-examine whether this is the job for you.
Where do you see yourself in the next 2-5 years? If you'd never want your boss' position, it may be time to re-examine whether this is the job for you. | Source

When Is Enough, Enough?

Here are 15 warning signs to help you understand when enough is enough. Don't let an unhappy situation turn bleak. Know when the time is right to pack up your bags and find a better opportunity.

One person's unbearable work situation may be another's dream job because of people's differing

  • talents
  • connections
  • work styles
  • career goals and
  • coping mechanisms.

Don't you owe it to yourself to be satisfied in your professional life as well as in your personal life? Know when enough is enough.

Move On Before You Become Bitter and Burned Out

You can end up with health consequences if you stay in a job without real challenge at a company that fails to value you or which doesn't provide the needed training or resources.
You can end up with health consequences if you stay in a job without real challenge at a company that fails to value you or which doesn't provide the needed training or resources. | Source

Warning Sign 1: You've Fallen Out of Love With Your Work

As a new employee, there was a "honeymoon" period as you settled into your work. You were proud to be associated with the company, its products and your co-workers (well, most of them anyhow). You drank eagerly of the company Kool-Aid, believing in its mission like a young doe munching on fresh Spring leaves.

But somewhere along the way there was some backslide. Reality struck hard. Perhaps it was ugly. Now you find yourself out of love. This happens when a relationship isn't nurtured and stoked properly. (And yes, employment is a relationship.)

Do You Still Eagerly Drink the Company Kool-Aid?

The "company Kool-Aid" refers to the self-serving and not always accurate "spin" that a company often puts on its corporate strategy, programs, policies, and events.
The "company Kool-Aid" refers to the self-serving and not always accurate "spin" that a company often puts on its corporate strategy, programs, policies, and events. | Source

Reader Poll

Do you drink the company Kool-Aid?

See results

Now that warm fuzzy feeling you once felt for your employer is just a souring in the back of your throat. You no longer believe in the company mission, and it's getting harder to fake.

The frustrations of your job outweigh any possible rewards: promotions, pay raises, bonuses, a bigger office, etc. Unfortunately, the company can no longer throw money at your deflated heart and make it all better.

Like a couple who is married only in the legal sense, the magic has dissipated. The relationship is hollow and pained. You're simply trading time for money now, baby. You know what you need to do.

Warning Sign 2: You're Out Of Options

You’ve tried other alternatives, and they haven’t worked. You've sat down to talk about the situation with your manager, Human Resources, and teammates. You've asked for specific help in finding a collaborative solution. But your problems persist.

Sick Again? Maybe It's the Job

Many studies show that job stress is the major source of stress in America today.  This includes lack of job security, workload, people issues, and work/life balance.
Many studies show that job stress is the major source of stress in America today. This includes lack of job security, workload, people issues, and work/life balance. | Source

Warning Sign 3: Your Health Is Suffering

Not only has work stopped being fun but it's also started to interfere with your health. You find work mentally, emotionally and physically draining. You can't wait to leave at the end of each day, and you dread the start of each work week.

You may have also begun to miss more work due to stress-related illness such as migraines, back pain, or high blood pressure. Perhaps you notice that you're catching more colds and flu and hanging on to them longer. You frequently feel sick or exhausted.

Why Accepting A Counter Offer Is Usually Not A Good Move

Warning Sign 4: You're In a Losing Industry Or Company

I've worked in industries when they realized their glory days were behind them. They exude a not-so-quiet desperation to regain dominance.

For the employee, the trouble with holding onto such a job too long is this: in the company's constant drive to belt-tighten and "do more with less," innovation and focus often suffer terribly. Companies become understaffed and overstretched while they chase market share for an overall shrinking customer base.

It's hard to bring your best game when you're worried about whether your job or the company will exist tomorrow. Ultimately you have to decide whether you want to aim to be the best employee you can be at

  • a losing company in a shrinking industry or
  • one that still has substantial potential for growth.

Only One Life To Live? Then Use It Well

This cat may have nine lives, but you do not.  Use your one life well.
This cat may have nine lives, but you do not. Use your one life well. | Source

Warning Sign 5: You Have No Future Focus Here

When you think about your career, where you do you want to be two, five, or even 10 years from now? Do you see yourself with your current company? Are you interested in your boss' job?

Organizational changes such as reorganizations, layoffs, and leadership shake-ups are a common turning point. If you've ever been through an organizational change that wasn't managed well, you know that it can cause even to most loyal of employees to second-guess their future with the company.

In addition, sometimes high achievers find that their interests and skills simply outgrow the career options that their current employer can provide (e.g., exposure to international markets). Or they grow frustrated waiting for key leaders to retire.

Other employees achieve an employment milestone and wonder if this is all there is. (Career crisis alert!) Examples include

  • completing large projects
  • reaching an important service anniversary or
  • earning a year-end bonus or other large award.

If you're starting to suspect that there is more opportunity for you outside of the company than in it, you may be right. You may be better served branching out into other industries and problem solving situations, growing your success to include a broader scale or a different environment.

Changing employers offers not only a chance to recharge your batteries but it also offers the possibility of failure—and that in itself is compelling, particularly if you've been stuck in the same role for years.

Uncomfortable Fit

At work, do you feel like a square peg in a round hole?  You may be experiencing poor person-organization fit.
At work, do you feel like a square peg in a round hole? You may be experiencing poor person-organization fit. | Source

Warning Sign 6: You Don't Fit the Company Culture

One day you realize that you no longer fit the company culture—or never did. You're the proverbial square peg in the round hole. Or, you realize there's rampant

  • lying
  • favoritism
  • tolerance of bullying and verbal abuse
  • illegal harassment or discrimination, or
  • other unlawful behavior.

Why are you still there? If you don't figure this one out, you will either be consumed by the Dark Forces or you will become one of them.

Warning 7: You're No Longer Learning

You are no longer learning, and the type of fun you're having sure isn't work-related. (Bored, you've resorted to spending work time on social media, writing your novel, or playing Fantasy Football.)

You're stagnating in your job, going through the motions by performing the same tasks—just different client, different year. You need more challenge and responsibility, and you can’t get that in your current company.

Bored At Work? You're Not Alone

Click thumbnail to view full-size
This polar bear is one bored Sea World employee.While the rest of us celebrate the holidays, Bob's back at the power plant control room ensuring that everything is up and running as it should be. Z-z-z-z-z. Life doesn't get much better than this.This job is a carnival of fun.Somebody order food.  Please.Sitting down on the job.Bored stop sign lady ... at least she did her nails.Even break time is lonely at this Target store.This bored tiger doesn't even have to hunt for his own food.At 4 a.m., work gets awful boring even for a Las Vegas casino worker.
This polar bear is one bored Sea World employee.
This polar bear is one bored Sea World employee. | Source
While the rest of us celebrate the holidays, Bob's back at the power plant control room ensuring that everything is up and running as it should be. Z-z-z-z-z.
While the rest of us celebrate the holidays, Bob's back at the power plant control room ensuring that everything is up and running as it should be. Z-z-z-z-z. | Source
Life doesn't get much better than this.
Life doesn't get much better than this. | Source
This job is a carnival of fun.
This job is a carnival of fun. | Source
Somebody order food.  Please.
Somebody order food. Please. | Source
Sitting down on the job.
Sitting down on the job. | Source
Bored stop sign lady ... at least she did her nails.
Bored stop sign lady ... at least she did her nails. | Source
Even break time is lonely at this Target store.
Even break time is lonely at this Target store. | Source
This bored tiger doesn't even have to hunt for his own food.
This bored tiger doesn't even have to hunt for his own food. | Source
At 4 a.m., work gets awful boring even for a Las Vegas casino worker.
At 4 a.m., work gets awful boring even for a Las Vegas casino worker. | Source

Warning Sign 8: Your Contributions and Skills Are Undervalued

Your ideas are not being heard, and it gives you the sinking feeling that you just don't matter here. Although your skills are evolving, you've already been type cast. You are pigeon-holed—stuck in one department and assigned a label no matter what training and development you've undertaken (e.g., "an IT type," "not management material"). It will take heroic levels of effort and personal braiding the change this. Is this what you want?

Unfair Beyond Words?

Bob is stunned as his boss adds yet more workload.  "Attaboys" won't pay his mortgage.
Bob is stunned as his boss adds yet more workload. "Attaboys" won't pay his mortgage. | Source

Warning Sign 9: You're Not Being Fairly Rewarded

Good "yes" person that you are, your job has expanded as you've taken on extra tasks one by one. Your paycheck, however, does not reflect the widened scope of your work. When you compare your salary to that of peers in your industry or profession, it becomes clear that you're being taken advantage of.

In the end, attaboys are nice, but they won't pay your mortgage.

Cheap Stress Therapy

If you paint this on your cubicle wall, it's guaranteed to get you some time off for stress therapy.
If you paint this on your cubicle wall, it's guaranteed to get you some time off for stress therapy. | Source

Reader Poll

Who suffers MOST when there is an employee who wants to quit but stays (for whatever reason)?

See results

Warning Sign 10: You're Not Getting the Resources You Need

One surefire sign of company trouble is if you chronically don’t have necessary resources to do your job—time, people, money, and materials. A company that is poorly led or in excessive debt, for example, may invoke resource freezes.

One employer I worked for called a moratorium on office supplies for the rest of the year while the organization hemorrhaged money. From October until December, employees brought what we couldn't live without from home! Weird but true.

Employees can also get caught in political turf wars in which department managers compete for head count and budget dollars.

Office Mean Girls?

If your office is filled with gossip, verbal spats and nastiness, consider your role in the conflict as well as the company culture.  Then determine a path forward.
If your office is filled with gossip, verbal spats and nastiness, consider your role in the conflict as well as the company culture. Then determine a path forward. | Source

Warning Sign 11: Your work relationships are troubled

Can't stand your boss? Do you find yourself walking on eggshells much of the time at work? Are your co-workers gossipy, rude, and as petty as middle school students? Is teamwork dead?

Conflict in work groups is natural, and it can be either constructive or destructive. But if your work relationships have disintegrated into huffy arguments, the silent treatment, email flames, or personal insults, then you need to make a decision.

Regardless of who started it and why, you've allowed the situation to get this out of hand, so are you going to ... ?

  • stay and try to adapt and problem solve
  • let the situation escalate, or
  • seek greener pastures, leaving the Office Jerk or Office Mean Girls behind to chew their cud.

All Work and No Play

This dedicated company employee spends her weekends and holidays on the sofa with her two feline assistants catching up on work emails and project deadlines.  Lucky lady.
This dedicated company employee spends her weekends and holidays on the sofa with her two feline assistants catching up on work emails and project deadlines. Lucky lady. | Source

Warning Sign 12: You Have No Work-Life Balance

If you can't have dinner with your family, take a Disney vacation, or recuperate from surgery without being pestered about work, something is out of whack, my friend. Fix it while you still can.

In my years as an HR investigator, there have been some jaw-dropping examples of managers failing to honor workers' family time. For example:

  • One employee had to literally leave the country to avoid having family vacation time interrupted.
  • Another employee's manager requested that she perform work even though she was recuperating from surgery and out on medical leave.
  • Then there was the woman whose manager called her when she was in the hospital delivery room while the employee was in labor. The boss wanted information for a grant proposal, and the employee acquiesced but none too politely.

There's a trick to the Graceful Exit. It begins with the vision to recognize when a job, a life stage, a relationship is over—and to let go. It means leaving what's over without denying its value.

— Ellen Goodman

Video Advice: How To Resign From A Job

Warning Sign 13: Your Work Performance Needs Improvement

If you've been receiving a lot of written negative feedback about your job performance, here's a warning. Your performance issues are being documented as a part of a formal performance management process. This is not good.

Hey, slacker, get the feet off the desk and take the toys home. And get back to work.
Hey, slacker, get the feet off the desk and take the toys home. And get back to work. | Source

Written feedback usually accompanies difficult performance conversations about mistakes you've made and conflicts or misunderstandings in which you've played a starring role. Generally, your situation is more urgent the more accurate these are for you:

  1. several layers of management are involved in your performance conversations or are copied on emails about your performance
  2. you're now receiving criticism about even small issues and it's perhaps even coming from different directions (e.g., other managers)
  3. co-workers are increasingly standoffish (if they're honest, they'd probably tell you that you're considered "damaged goods" because of your performance)
  4. management has used some of these words in discussing your performance: "does not meet expectations," "more is expected," "substantial improvement is expected immediately," "your performance is unacceptable."
  5. you're put on a formal performance improvement plan (a "PIP"). Snarky HR types call this a "get-well plan."

From an HR perspective, it's been my experience that few people successfully work their way out of such a plan. But even if you do, consider the reputational damage this has done to your career with the company and your future in it.

Better Get While the Gettin' Is Good

Racing off to work.  Gotta go, gotta go ...
Racing off to work. Gotta go, gotta go ... | Source

Warning Sign 14: You've Burned Some Bridges

Whether you fully intended to or not, you've burned bridges in the organization over the years. The people who are keeping score are now in positions to make you sorry. You may want to seek a fresh start somewhere else, building new bridges, depending on the

  • perceived transgression
  • your career options
  • the retaliatory nastiness of the wronged party and
  • their position of influence.

Summary: 15 Signs It's Time To Quit Your Job

  1. You’ve fallen out of love with your work

  2. Other options have failed

  3. Your health is suffering

  4. You’re in a losing industry or company

  5. You don’t have a future focus with the company

  6. You no longer fit the company culture (or never did)

  7. You’re no longer learning and having fun

  8. Your contributions and skills are not fully valued

  9. You’re not being fairly rewarded (underpaid)

  10. You don’t have needed resources to get the job done

  11. Your work relationships are toxic

  12. There’s no work-life balance

  13. Your work performance needs immediate improvement

  14. You’ve burned some bridges

  15. You’re staying for the wrong reasons

Warning Sign 15: You're Staying For the Wrong Reasons

Continuing to stay makes you restless, sad, angry, and resentful, but you're hesitant to admit it to yourself. Your priorities are misguided.

If you're staying out of guilt or obligation (e.g., "what will my company, boss, clients, or coworkers do without me?"), get over yourself. (I say that with love.) Every employee is replaceable, and they'll adjust without you just fine in the long run. Trust me.

Ditto if you're staying because of your fear of change.

Put your big boy/big girl britches on and consider yourself, your job situation, and your personal financial picture. Accept responsibility like an adult, and prioritize what is important to YOU. Is it job challenge, money, your health, relationships with coworkers, promotional opportunity ...?

If staying keeps you from other better opportunities, then you must go seek your future. If you stay even though your head is not 100% in the game, you are short-selling everyone involve—particularly yourself.

Your professional reputation is crafted from everyday perceptions. Thus, the longer that others perceive you as someone who mind-numbingly spacewalks through his or her day, the more your reputation suffers. Don't turn into someone you're not: sad, angry, restless, resentful. You are better than that.

You don't want to turn around one day and realize that you resent the hell out of the same people you cared enough about to pass up those great career opportunities for. You owe it to them and to yourself to fulfill your potential. If outside the company is the only place this can be done, then fly.

Fly, Fly Away

If you decide to leave, be professional about it.
If you decide to leave, be professional about it. | Source

What's In A Name? Locations With Names Associated With Quitting Your Job

show route and directions
A markerBye, Sweden -
834 98 Bye, Sweden
get directions

B markerBored Spring, Arizona, USA -
Bored Spring, Arizona, USA
get directions

C markerEscape Point, Alaska, USA -
Escape Point, Alaska 99901, USA
get directions

D markerExit, Oman -
Exit, Oman
get directions

E markerFreedom, California, USA -
Freedom, CA, USA
get directions

F markerGone, Chad -
Gone, Chad
get directions

G markerQuitters Point, Oregon, USA -
Quitters Point, Oregon 97342, USA
get directions

H markerQuitting Lake, Canada -
Quitting Lake, Opportunity No. 17, AB T0G, Canada
get directions

I markerRetreat, Tanzania -
Retreat, Tanzania
get directions

J markerStagnant Lake, Oregon, USA -
Stagnant Lake, Oregon 97739, USA
get directions

Find A Job You Can Be Happy With

I hope you find a job where you're overjoyed and too blessed to be stressed. If you don't have that now, keep searching.
I hope you find a job where you're overjoyed and too blessed to be stressed. If you don't have that now, keep searching. | Source

© 2015 FlourishAnyway

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    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 16 months ago from USA

      Happymommy2520 - Good for you that you didn't just stay trapped in a job situation you disliked. If you don't like something, then change it! Best of luck to you on a bright and happy future.

    • Happymommy2520 profile image

      Amy 16 months ago from East Coast

      This article is packed with useful information on moving on from a job. I like the way you highlighted how most people feel when they don't like their jobs and explained it in detail. Life is to short to stay at a job you dislike with negative people. I have walked away from a very destructive work environment and it felt great. I look forward to reading more of your work!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 19 months ago from USA

      breathing - Thank you for your kind endorsement. Timing is so difficult to get right, but I hope this helps many people know when is the right time to move on. All the best to you.

    • breathing profile image

      Sajib 19 months ago from Bangladesh

      This is really hard to decide when to quit job. There is hardly any employee who doesn’t go through this phase in their job career. But the author has described 15 excellent points which can help all of us to determine the exact moment when we should say, “okay. I’ve done enough and now is the time to quit!!”Retiring on the right time is indeed something that we can be proud of. After all how many employees can finish their job life on their own terms in today’s competitive job world? So thanks to the hub author on behalf of all the employees for such a nice and informative post!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 19 months ago from USA

      Thelma - Burnout certainly spills over into many other aspects of life and in most cases it's just not worth it. There are lots of ways to make a living. Why stick to a job that makes you unhappy? Thank you for reading and commenting.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 19 months ago from USA

      Rajan - Looking back, so many people say that. I am glad you are happy now.

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 19 months ago from Germany

      What an awesome and excellent hub! I always quit my part time job (I don´t work full time) when I suffered from burnout due to stress and most of all when I had to run after my wages. I quit my last job (which was the best job I had) which was in Ireland because I had to move back to where I am now. Thanks for sharing.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 19 months ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      I can certainly relate to many of these situations and I took a long, long time quitting my last job. I just wish I had read this then. Very useful hub. Sharing this ahead.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 22 months ago from USA

      swalia - Thank you for the kind kudos. Congratulations on your decision to finally let go of a job that obviously wasn't doing you any favors. And now on to the next chapter of your life! Best wishes!

    • swalia profile image

      Shaloo Walia 22 months ago

      Awesome hub, I must say!

      I have recently quit the job I was in for ten years. After two years of extreme stress, I finally made the decision to quit. And now my only regret is why I didn't do it earlier.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Julie - Thanks for reading and voting. Have a great week!

    • Julie K Henderson profile image

      Julie K Henderson 2 years ago

      Bravo. This is a comprehensive and compelling article. I think you addressed the topic exceptionally well. Voted up.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Thelma Alberts - Thanks for your comment. There's more than one job available in the world. Sometimes we close ourselves off to the options that are available and stay in a job that makes us miserable, thereby making others feel miserable as well.

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 2 years ago from Germany

      Those are good reasons to quit the jobs but other people have to work to live. I quit my jobs before in Germany when I was feeling burned out because of the stress but the last time I quit my job, I was crying as I did not want to but I had to because of my health. That was my job as a massage therapist in a spa in Ireland. I had to quit as the weather in Ireland made me sick and I had to go back to Germany for a treatment. Thanks for sharing this hub. Well done. Happy weekend!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Nadine - It was helpful to have your perspective as both an employer and someone who has been self-employed. Thanks for stopping by!

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 2 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      What an excellent article. Thank goodness that I 'm self employed for the last 30 years. I have also been an employer but made absolutely sure if these people had an interest and a love for the job I was paying them for. Being a good employer is also very important. People who are desperate to earn money are not always the right kind to employ. They will tell you all kinds of lies and if you not careful they can cost you a fortune. Being self employed is not always possible for people, but what is important is that the work they do MUST be of an interest to them, no matter what the payment might be.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Kamalesh050 - I'm glad that you have finally found something that suits you. Thank you for reading and have a great week!

    • Kamalesh050 profile image

      Kamalesh050 2 years ago from Sahaganj, Dist. Hooghly, West Bengal, India

      Wow, what an EXCELLENT hub ! OUTSTANDING I must say. I am totally in agreement as to what you have written. I have retired having changed my job seven times!! If you are not happy with your job it's always better to quit! Keep on writing my friend. Best Wishes, Kamalesh

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Joyette - It can certainly prove to be a growth experience. I am glad you are in a good place now. Thank you for sharing your experience. Many other people can identify with you.

    • Joyette  Fabien profile image

      Joyette Fabien 2 years ago from Dominica

      This is really interesting, useful and informative! Voted up!

      I went through the experience of being frustrated on the job and when I finally made the move that too was a challenge, but now I am comfortable and happy where I am.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Amanda - You're right. One life, lots of different ways to earn a living. Thank you for the kind kudos. Have a terrific weekend.

    • stuff4kids profile image

      Amanda Littlejohn 2 years ago

      Another outstanding piece of work, beautifully presented and full of wit and wisdom. Smart use of the map capsule, too!

      I was always lucky to be able to do work that I enjoyed and found satisfying, as did my husband, so we were never troubled by these kinds of anxieties. As Bill said above, for many it's a privilege to be in work at all, but I agree with him that maybe, you know, there are other choices that should be made for those able to make them.

      Heck, you only live once and every moment is precious. Live!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Larry - YES! You are absolutely right. The stress of wondering whether it'll be you, the depression of having been selected and needing to find another job, or the extra workload, work hours, and grief of seeing coworkers "cut" definitely can impact a person's health. Family members can really feel it too, especially when they don't know how to help.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 2 years ago from Oklahoma

      One think I noticed when I was in a bad situation at a job was the negative effect it had on my health.

      Wonderful article.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Pawpawwrites - Hats off to you for coping with a difficult situation, with an eye on the future. Some jobs can crush the soul, and when there is a family depending on you it may come down to a crushed soul vs.no bread. I hope you are rewarding yourself handsomely.

    • Pawpawwrites profile image

      Jim 2 years ago from Kansas

      I worked a job that I didn't like for over 3 decades. I did it for the money, which was very good. I was very good at the job, and learned to cope with it. I had a goal of leaving early all of that time though, and was able to retire at 56. I can relate to some of the signs given above.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Suzanne - It sounds like you are counting the days until you can say, "Take this job and ... give it to somebody else." I hope you find something that suits your talents with managers that value you as a person. I'm rooting for you.

    • Suzanne Day profile image

      Suzanne Day 2 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

      Wonderful hub and very informative for me. I work in a supermarket where I am expected to do the work of two small teams for a quarter of the average wage of one person. They keep hiring other "gun" managers to manage me and all these people do is throw jobs at me when I already have too much to do. There have been no payrises or recognition at all for my work and a couple of empty compliments does not pay the bills!

      Hours were downgraded and it was horrible going in there knowing I couldn't pay even the rent in full with the money received. I HATE that company!

      They always pay the women far less, which is extremely sexist. However, men do not do the same work as women (they are the managers) so cannot complain to the authorities though it sucks.

      Looking to leave at first opportunity. Unfortunately, nearly all companies I have worked for recently have been like this - disorganised, badly paid and treating employees like Microsoft slaves. Wish life didn't have to be like this.

      Voted useful and can't wait to take your advice...

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      elle64 - You are welcome.

    • elle64 profile image

      elle64 2 years ago from Scandinavia

      You have such a Way of making people feel empowered .Thanks.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      elle64 - I wish you the best of luck. Approach your choice from a position of power. The power of your destiny is in your hands!

    • elle64 profile image

      elle64 2 years ago from Scandinavia

      Excellent hub ,I am realizing I have to begik to consider other work options.Thanks

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Valene - There's always Facebook, Twitter, and good old face-to-face lunches to keep in contact with the old group! Thanks for stopping by!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      CASE1WORKER - I hope people who think they are stuck can see their way out. Have a great week!

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      Valene 2 years ago from Missouri

      This is the best take-away point for me: "You don't want to turn around one day and realize that you resent the hell out of the same people you cared enough about to pass up those great career opportunities for. You owe it to them and to yourself to fulfill your potential. If outside the company is the only place this can be done, then fly."

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Mark Johann - Certainly so, but it's tunnel vision to consider that a person has only a single option in staying at a job that makes him or her miserable. I've found personally that once I had a plan in motion to develop other options, my world opened up and I could tolerate the day to day stuff better. It's all about finding a way to be happy while you work.

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      CASE1WORKER 2 years ago from UNITED KINGDOM

      I think everyone can find a match in the reasons- Perhaps it is good to realise that leaving a job is OK and we don't have to be bored or upset just to get our wages

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      Mark Johann 2 years ago from Italy

      I read a book that states that sometimes, we need to work to survive for food even though we don't love it.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Peg - I'm glad you found an easy exit with a manager who seemed to care about you both as an employee and a person. That makes all the difference.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      justmesuzanne - Good for you that you found freedom. Working 8-5 is not for everyone. Thanks for stopping by!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Jo - Thanks so much for your kind compliment. I tend to get the itch at 18-24 months. Isn't that awful? I tend to hang on too long. Have a wonderful week and count those months or weeks until retirement.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Perspycacious - Thank you for your kind compliment. After about 2 years and over 90 hubs, I am doing reasonably well and have learned a lot since I first started here, that's for sure! I'm satisfied enough that I have no immediate plans to fly away.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Audrey - Thank you so much! Have a wonderful week!

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      Audrey Howitt 2 years ago from California

      Wow--what a great article! Loved, loved this!

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      Peg Cole 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      This is great information about knowing when it's time to go. That can be a really important realization for those of us who fit some or all of the 15 ways. I especially liked the resignation video. It reminded me of how good I felt when mine was over. My newest manager in a string of management changes understood my reasons and empathized with my decision. She wished me luck and I felt she meant it.

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      Demas W Jasper 2 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      A typically comprehensive, outstanding, FlourishAnyway article. Are you getting enough return from your articles to compensate for leaving this on HP versus selling first rights somewhere?

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      justmesuzanne 2 years ago from Texas

      Well presented and very useful information. Having experienced it all, I made up my mind about 7 years ago to never again be a wage slave! No J O B is worth the suffering!

      Voted up, useful and interesting! :)

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Another excellent hub. Over the years, I've found that around the 5 year mark, I need to make a move, but unfortunately, I often hang in there for much longer. I'm looking to retire soon, so hopefully I don't have to stress too much anymore.

      As always, a clever, informative and interesting read.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      John - I have a cousin with the railroad here in the States, and I think she likes it about as much. I'm glad you've found a much happier life for yourself in retirement. Thanks for stopping by! Have a terrific week.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Jeannie - I'm hoping that you find something that suits your skills and passions. You're a very creative lady with so much talent. Some employer has to see that about you. Thanks for voting, commenting, and sharing.

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      John Hansen 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      This is a very comprehensive list of reasons to quit your job Flourish. I have only had two permanent jobs in my life, though with one employer, the Railway Department, I worked in two different cities and was with them for 17 years in total before I took voluntary early retirement. I then got a job in admin at a University library and kept that job for 10 years before I again applied for voluntary early retirement due to having to move because of my parents poor health. I wasn't always happy in the Railways but spent most of my time on the relief staff so moved around a lot doing different jobs. So if I was doing one I didn't like it usually wasn't long before I was moved somewhere else and often better. I can relate to reasons 6 and 15 however. Great hub, voted up.

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      Jeannie InABottle 2 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      This is an awesome hub. I have experienced all of these things a time or two at many of my jobs. Voted up and shared!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      sgbrown - Good for you! You knew what your tolerance point was and were decisive about it. A few changes here, more there and then you look around and it's no longer an acceptable work arrangement and time to move on. Have a great weekend, and thanks for reading!

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      Sheila Brown 2 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      Life is too short to be miserable at work, after all we spend more time at work than we do any place else. I quit one job after 15 years. Things changed too much and I had gone "up the ladder" as far as I could. I was miserable! The second job I quit after 8 years. Again, things were changing and not for the better. Unbearable bosses with horrible attitudes can drive you to be miserable. Now, hubby is retired and we have our own business.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      poetryman6969 - That is so bad. I hope someone complained to HR or higher ups about him, even anonymously. I once had a boss who said any company who has lawsuits, union campaigns, EEOC complaints, and other such employee trouble must surely deserve them. And he was in HR. Thanks for reading and commenting. Have a great week and stay warm.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Lady G - Sounds like they were cooking up much more than burgers at that Mickey Ds. Glad you found your way out quickly. It was the right thing to do.

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      poetryman6969 2 years ago

      Although I am not from India, the day my bad joke of a boss said, seriously, whilst other employees who were born in India were present, that he "hates Indians" I knew the handwriting was on the wall for me.

      For some people in IT there can be a "love/hate" relationship with offshore labor. You might like having the extra help doing work you really don't want to do but there are difficulties involved with the fact that they are on the other side of the world so our clocks don't match up. Also, some IT people are constantly looking over their shoulders and wondering when their job will be outsourced.

      It is still inexcusable in my view to let whatever feelings of frustration and insecurity one may have come out in a purely racist way. This is particularly true even for a buffoon idiot of a boss whose stated views on women were demeaning as well.

      I got out principally because any company dumb enough to promote an incompetent racist, sexist bigot to a position of authority deserves the EEOC lawsuits that will one day come it's way.

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      Debra Allen 2 years ago from West By God

      There are ways that you can focus on getting another type of job with your current resume. It all is not so bleak. Great advice here.

      I once worked at a McDonalds and quit even though It was not the greatest thing that I could do. The boss and another employee were having an affair and she was using me for something I never wanted to have a part in. Oh and she was married and had two kids. I quit in the middle of a shift and then two weeks later (to get my last paycheck) was praised by the employees that were still there. Shortly after that I heard that she was fired and the young man had quit too. It was not a good position to be in, for anyone!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Vellur - Well said. Have a terrific weekend, and thank you for reading.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 2 years ago from Dubai

      Great pointers on when to quit a job. Better to quit and move on to greener pastures than be unhappy all the time.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Bill - How terrific! Congratulations on that achievement. I hope you have a wish list of specific things you want to do in your new job. You're such a terrific travel writer. When the time comes, perhaps think about setting up an LLC so you can charge off relevant expenses.

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      Bill De Giulio 2 years ago from Massachusetts

      Hi Flourish. Great list. I just celebrate 30 years with my present employer and while I can't say that I love my job I don't hate it either. I have great working relationships and do continue to learn. Over the years I have thought about leaving but I'm too close to retiring and really don't want to start over in a new position. My "new" job will come when I retire and start pursuing my real passions such as writing more, traveling more, gardening, painting, etc.

      Another wonderful hub. Have a great weekend.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Romanian - There are so many workers who are mentally checked out. It's much more preferable to be in love with your work. Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Mark - I personally don't find that HP alone brings in enough to fund my lifestyle. Either way, I wish you the very best in your endeavors.

    • Mark Johann profile image

      Mark Johann 2 years ago from Italy

      I am planning to quit my job and make full time here in HP, does it worth it? What do you think, guys? Or are some of doing this? Happy to know it.

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      Nicu 2 years ago from Oradea, Romania

      This was very interesting. You probably saved the life of many people who don't know if they should quit their job.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      ezzly - Job inertia is the easy way out. Making a change is difficult but often worth it. Thanks for stopping by and for tweeting, voting, commenting. Have a great Valentine's Day weekend!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Easy Exercise - Thank you for the kind kudos. Have a Happy Valentine's Day!

    • ezzly profile image

      ezzly 2 years ago

      Fantastic hub. voted up and tweeting! You know I think many people aren't brave enough to take the plunge and leave their job to find something more fulfilling. Every worker should read this article to check in on their work health!

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      Kelly A Burnett 2 years ago from United States

      FlourishAnyWay,

      Oh, I love your work - and the map! The map was over the top! Thank you for a delightful hub!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      travmaj - I wish your friend well and hope they have a plan or at least that things fall into place. Thanks for stopping by. Have a good week.

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      travmaj 2 years ago from australia

      You've made me think about this. A dear friend has just quit a job after several years. The main reason seems to be falling out of love with the work. It was a responsible position and I can only wish her well. But yes, important to be as happy and confident as possible or pastures new on the agenda.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      CrisSp - Congratulations to you for finding a job that thrills you. I hope you're happy in it for a long time. Thanks for commenting, voting, sharing.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      MsDora - Sometimes the bravest thing you can do is call it quits. We sure do live and learn. Have a great week, and thanks for reading and commenting.

    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 2 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      True enough, I was totally burned out in my previous desk job prior to becoming a Flight Attendant. So, one day, I decided to just fly... and fly I did! I couldn't be more happier, not only I get to explore the world, I also get to explore my inner self and realized my creative potential.

      Good hub. Up and sharing.

      P.S. Yes, there's always a way out! :)

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Linda - I appreciate your reading and your lovely comment. Have a wonderful week!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Devika - Doing the same job repeatedly every day for year on end doesn't bother some people, but others prefer to grow their talents. I hope your friend finds happiness elsewhere. Thanks for reading and commenting.

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      Dora Isaac Weithers 2 years ago from The Caribbean

      Flourish, you're very first reason should have been enough for me; but I stayed preferring to be NOT a quitter. You make so much sense; those still in the workforce should pay attention. Thanks!

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      Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This is an excellent hub, Flourish, just like all your other hubs. I love the way in which you incorporate interesting photos, polls and maps with useful information. Great job!

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      Devika Primić 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Interesting you should write on this topic. I know of someone who quit his job due to the many negative points. Working for a company for over five years and still in the same position. I like your pointers and always a useful hub from you.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Sha - Great story you have there! It's so important to quit before you hate your job with every pore. Have yourself a fabulous week!

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      Shauna L Bowling 2 years ago from Central Florida

      Flourish, I quit my job cold turkey over two years ago. I hadn't had a raise in three years once upper management made some staff changes. It got to where I hated going to work. When I found myself calling in sick (when I wasn't) days in a row, knowing I had no more sick pay coming to me, I knew it was time to quit. And I did just that. Via email. On a Sunday.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Mark Johann - Best of luck in your ventures. I hope you find something that suits you better. Have a great week.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      janshares - I'm glad you made the move that was right for you. It's too easy to ignore all the signs and stay miserable. Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment. Have a great weekend.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Catherine - It often happens like that. The head office needed to get a clue a little more quickly before it bled talent, but leadership often has a vested interest in who they have hired. I once knew of a manager who was so bad he was removed from his plant manager position in the middle of a union election. Executives said that in lieu of termination he would never lead people again. He was good technically but he was a screamer, someone who threatened and made inappropriate remarks. He was terribly unfair to employees. Less than five years later he popped up in another company location as another plant manager. I'm glad you knew when to leave your situation before it went further downhill. Thanks for commenting and sharing. Have a great Sunday.

    • Mark Johann profile image

      Mark Johann 2 years ago from Italy

      I am into the area of quitting before it turns bitter. This is best for my part since I feel I am not in love with job anymore.

    • janshares profile image

      Janis Leslie Evans 2 years ago from Washington, DC

      This is very informative and helpful in getting the employee to really explore where they are and what they need do to yo make a move. The warning signs are very comprehensive. When I left my job after 22 years, it was the best career move I ever made. Voted up and useful.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Faith Reaper - You are so right about that. The leader really sets the tone regarding acceptable behavior. Have a great weekend!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Grant's World - I wish you all the best as you move forward in a new direction. Life is too short to be unhappy. Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Heidi - You're absolutely right -- we certainly do live and learn. Hope you're enjoying this weekend and not spending it working! Thanks for reading and sharing.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image

      Catherine Giordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

      I once worked in an office with about 50people. A new boss came in. people started leaving. first the low level employees because it was easier for them to find jobs. then the higher level employees. I finally left and started my own business. Finally, the head office fired the boss.

      You did a great job explaining to people how when and why they should leave.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Shyron - Wow, that is certainly a reason to walk out. I'm glad you were able to leave quickly, safely, and find something else so soon. Thanks for reading, voting, and sharing.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      UnnamedHarald - Congratulations to you. I'm sure it did surprise everyone concerned (even you) but I hope this will give you the relaxation and peace of mind that you seek. I wish you all the best.

    • UnnamedHarald profile image

      David Hunt 2 years ago from Cedar Rapids, Iowa

      Very interesting article, FlourishAnyway. I can attest to the feelings you've described (most of them, anyway) and coincidentally I have just pulled the trigger this week to leave my job because of some of the things you've described. My last day at my desk will be the end of the month. I will be retiring a little earlier than previously thought, but enough is enough. This morning (a Saturday) I astonished my wife by sleeping till 8:00-- I never sleep later than 6:00 even on weekends, but I felt so relaxed...

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

      Great insight here, dear Flourish. If one is having two or more of these here you have highlighted, then may be time to move on ...

      Sometimes the job is great, but those one or two in charge are not, and cause one to not love the job. It is always a blessing when change happens for the better of all concerned. When the top dog understands and truly listens and is all for teamwork, and takes any problems on himself and does not point fingers, it makes for a wonderful working environment! He is a visionary who truly sees where the problems are and takes time to fix such problems in a professional manner.

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      Grant Handford 2 years ago from Canada

      I am currently going through this at work. I decided last year I needed to leave so started taking classes. I have one more then I get my realtors License. I am looking forward to getting out of sitting at a desk for 8 hours a day and doing more moving around and socializing. Meet some different people.

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      Heidi Thorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

      Unfortunately, I can say I've stayed for reasons 4, 13, 14 and 15... and have regretted it. Today, my older, wiser self would have found better ways to handle my situations or get out gracefully. Oh well... we're all a sum of our experiences, both good and bad. Voted up, useful, interesting and sharing. Happy No Work Weekend!

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago from Texas

      Some folks don't have the luxury of quitting, no matter the situation. I quit one job because my life was in danger after 1 single day. I walked out the door and to the next building, I was hired on the spot, started the same day and stayed for 22 years and loved it, until the company was bought by a corporate raider.

      Loved the hub, so much food for thought here.

      Voted up UAI and shared.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Frank - We've all probably had those types of jobs. At first you backwash the Kool-Aid then you just refuse to drink any more. Glad you liked it. Have a great weekend.

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      carrie Lee Night - Glad to see you again and it's good that you have a situation where you're surrounded by awesome workmates. They really do make a difference! Thanks for reading and try to stay warm.