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Top 10 Things You Should Never Say During a Job Interview

Updated on November 03, 2016
Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Ms. Inglish has been an award winning Employment & Training pro with regional placement records and tens of thousands in gainful employment.

Source

Avoid the Wrong Answer!

Many job candidates are nervous about participating in a job interview. After much hard work writing countless resumes, cover letters, and job applications, these individuals hope that they will interview well, impress the hiring officer of the company to which they have applied, and finally get hired.

With some practice and preparation, employment interviewing need not be a mystery or a horror. In fact, it can be enjoyable, informative, and even fun. In addition, every interview that you complete will make you more practiced in the art of interviewing. By continuing to interview for jobs, you will learn the range of variety of questions and scenarios that may confront you. Then you will be better prepared to win the job of your dreams!

There are many different comments that are inappropriate to make during a job interview. I gathered these ten things from my years of workforce development assignments with employers in my area.

Ten Things to Never Say in a Job Interview

Don't say:
1. How much does this job pay?
2. What does your company make/do?
3. Slang words or phrases.
4. What are the benefits, vacations, promotions, and bonuses?
5. Curse words or profanity of any kind.
6 Stereotypical language about other people.
7. Anything critical about a former employer.
8. No, I have no questions for you.
9. I don't have any weaknesses.
10. Your life story.

Some Answers Can Say This About You

Source

10 Things to Never Say in a Job Interview

1. How Much Does the Job Pay?

Some applicants ask this question before the interviewer has a chance to even ask his or her own first question, and this is a big mistake.

To ask about money first makes it seem as if all you are after is money, possibly with as little work as possible. As a rule, wages and salaries are not discussed during the first interview. If they are discussed, this will occur at the end of the session and usually via the interviewer asking what salary you expect. Give a range of salaries you can accept, rather than a fixed amount so that you do not limit your earning capabilities too tightly.

You may have three interviews altogether with one company. If money is discussed, it is up to the interviewer from the company to open up that subject. If he asks you how much money you want, have a range of salaries ready to provide. First, however, research how much the job you want really pays in your town and state, then come up with a range of a yearly salary to request. Look at Salary.com for help with this.

Example: Let's say an auto mechanic makes $35,000 a year in your city after working five years. When you apply to become an auto mechanic, state the range of pay you want as $32,000-$38,000 a year, or similar. Or you could use a broader range, like $30,000-$40,000 a year. Make sure it is a realistic range. For example, if a fast food full-time grill man in your town usually makes $13,000 per year, don't interview at that restaurant and ask for $20,000-$30,000 per year.

2. What Does Your Company Make/Do?

A job candidate must research the company for which they want to work before going into a job interview. Look the company up on the Internet and read as much as you can about it and take notes. Many company websites feature tabs for "About" and "History," so make sure to read them. Try to find the company's annual report and read it. Your local libraries can help you do that.

3. Slang Words or Phrases

The interview is not a casual conversation with friends on a street corner or in a lounge. The interview is a formal conversation and requires the use of good English grammar. There is not time enough during an interview for the interviewer to figure out what you are talking about. On the other hand, even if they do understand you, you are being disrespectful and overly casual by using slang. You will also sound like you are playing and not serious about doing good work, and the interviewer won't take you seriously. Just don't do it.

4. What Are the Benefits, Vacations, Promotions, and Bonuses?

Hiring officers and job interviewers like job candidates with self-confidence, but they do not like people who are selfish. The first interview you have with a company is all about what you can do for them. You are not doing them a favor by interviewing with them, so keep these questions until the second interview or until the interviewer opens up the subject.

The interviewer will ask you why the company should hire you and then you can more fully emphasize your skills, talents and contributions you have to offer them. Be prepared to tell clearly what specific ways you have helped your former employers.

The truth is, our language does betray us. Our words are a direct reflection of our thoughts and anyone who is incapable of expressing him- or herself without the use of profanity is handicapping themselves to an incredible degree.

— Champion Salesman Zig Ziglar

5. Profanity and Cursing of Any Kind

You must never curse, cuss, or use any kind of profanity in any job interview. Profanity includes scatological references like the the word "p*ssed," as in "p*ssed off." That is cursing by using references to bodily functions and it is profanity.

In addition, do not say "damn", "hell", the F-word, or, of course, the N-word. In addition, women are women and not "girls" or "‘hos."

6. Stereotypical Language.

Do not refer to people of other genders, sexual orientations, nationalities, ethnicities, races, handicaps, religions, or any other diversity by using any slang, negative terms, slurs, or other denigrating language. Ever.

Again, see the Zig Ziglar quote above.

7. Anything Critical About a Former Employer

Bashing a former boss, or criticizing them in any way, lets the interviewer know that you will do the same to them if you leave their company. Instead, you can explain that you had a difference of opinion with your former employer in work philosophies or styles. Do not dwell on your answer about an employer where things did not go so well for you, and make it short.

8. No, I Have No Questions for You.

If you are asked if you have any questions, don't say "No."

Saying NO says to the interviewer that you are not very interested in the company and not very smart. So be smart.

When you research the company before your interview, come up with at least three questions to ask about the company itself during the interview. For example, ask what plans they have to expand in the next 10 years, or ask what new products and services they might be considering. This is not the time to ask about salary and benefits, either.

9. I don't have any weaknesses.

You will likely be asked what strengths and weaknesses you have. If you say you don't have any, the interviewer will believe that you are lying or that you are not thinking.

You can say that you don't like to waste time on small talk and are working on being more friendly in the workplace. This is a positive "weakness." Further, you can choose one of your still-developing skills and describe how you are working to improve it. This type of Continuous Improvement is always appreciated.

10. Your Life Story

The interviewer will ask you to tell them a little about yourself, but this means where you went to school, what you accomplished in school, where you have worked, and how you have helped your former employers. It can include a little about hobbies and volunteer work, but don't dwell on these things.

Don't tell the employer anything that will lead them to knowing your age (unless you are under 18), race, policies, gender-related orientation, religious beliefs, medical conditions, or other personal information. Legally, until they are offering you a job, the employer is not allowed to even ask you if you are married, have children, or are planning these things in the future.

Interviewers can ask you what certifications and licenses you have relevant to the position.

If they ask you what nationality your last name is, politely answer that you don't know how that is relevant to the job, but that you would like to discuss your qualifications. If they ask you how old you are, tell them that you will gladly provide that information after you are hired. The exception to this is if you need to be at least 18 years old to work for the company in the USA. If you are 21 and look young, you may have to answer this question.

Finally, do not bring up personal problems in a job interview, including divorce, breaking up with a girlfriend, bankruptcy, etc.

Preparing Interview Responses

Vulgar, violent, improper language or coarse, racist, sexist jokes will limit opportunities in the choice of a mate, the selection of a job, the building of a career, and the establishment of friendships.

The message is clear: Learn the language rules; practice them in your everyday life."

Experiencing a work readiness class or mock interviewing class or workshop can be a big help in knowing what to say and what not to say during interviews.

There are also things that your potential employers' representatives should not say to you or ask you.

Interview Mistakes to Avoid

Why Should We Hire You?

© 2007 Patty Inglish

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    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 months ago from North America

      @Nate - Body language is important, as you point out, and practicing mock interviews on video or with a friend or instructor can help perfect one's personal presentation in an interview..

      I agree that a job can seem to be one thing in an interview and turn out to be entirely different day-to-day - agonizingly so! Asking questions during the interview can help get to reality, at least somewhat.

      Thanks for your views and experience!

    • Nate 8 months ago

      I do love interviews and I use these skills as recommended by the author of the article and I always ace my interviews. It's good to prepare yourself and let your body language talk for you as well and pay attention to the body language of the people interviewing you. Use proper grammar but assess the company culture as well. It should also be noted that even if an employer wants to employ you it does not mean you are meant for the job and might be unhappy working at that company. It will look equally bad on your CV if you job hop. So my advice is to have a career plan and to have plan a-c, meaning at least 3 different companies in mind. Also don't seem desperate or conceited. Listen to your 6th sense and to the panel of interviewers. Pray and believe in yourself and what you have to offer.

    • Nate 8 months ago

      I do love interviews and I use these skills as recommended by the author of the article and I always ace my interviews . It's good to prepare yourself and let your body language talk For you as wel and pay attention to the body language of the people interviewing you. Use proper grammar but assess the company culture as well. It should also be noted that even if an employer wants to employ you it does not mean you are meant for the job and might be unhappy working at that company. It will look equally bad on your cv if you job hop. So my advice is to have a career plan and to have plan a-c, meaning at least 3 different companies in mind. Also don't seem desperate nor conceited. Listen to your 6th sense and to the panel of interviewers. Pray And believe in yourself and what you have to offer

    • bra tapes 15 months ago

      I am very happy to be here because this is a very good site that provides lots of information about the topics covered in depth. Im glad to see that people are actually writing about this issue in such a smart way, showing us all different sides to it. Please keep it up. I cant wait to read whats next.

    • antigravity profile image

      antigravity 15 months ago

      Great informative content & will be very helpful for all job seekers.

    • DzyMsLizzy profile image

      Liz Elias 18 months ago from Oakley, CA

      Whew! I'm sure glad I'm retired and not in the job market. The last time I was, I failed to get the job, and I did not break any of the rules.

      On the "why should we hire you?" question (AFTER I'd already outlined my strengths and skills I could offer--which they already knew, anyway--see below), I answered, quite truthfully, that "I'm a mature woman, responsible and reliable with no wild oats to sow, meaning I won't have the Monday flu or other such issues."

      I actually believe the REAL reason I didn't get the job was good old-fashioned age discrimination. At the time, I was about 50; and the person subsequently hired was in his mid-20's. (Maybe gender discrimination, as well.) I already had the requisite skills; the new hire had to be taught. (I know, because I'd already been working there as a temp for 3 years!! I knew the staff, knew the person who got hired, and knew the procedures and software!)

      After that, I went the self-employment route with my new husband.

      I truly believe it's as my father used to complain: "They want someone 20 years old with 40 years experience."

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 24 months ago from North America

      That's true. I look over this Hub every time I prepare an interview. Thanks for commenting!

    • UndercoverAgent19 profile image

      UndercoverAgent19 24 months ago

      Very helpful hub! Although I'd like to think that some of these are common sense (don't stereotype, don't curse, etc.), the more specific tips are incredibly helpful to everyone, even as just a reminder. I will definitely review your hub before I have another job interview. It can't hurt to be ultra prepared to make a good first impression!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 24 months ago from North America

      They won't tell you what similar jobs' pay range is, siting company policy that salaries paid are not to be revealed even to each other by either employees or management. I would research the job title on Salary.com, where you can find the average pay range for your own city and state or any other city and state. If you know the average pay range for your area, then you can speak with greater confidence when you state a range that you want.

      Whoever states the salary expectation first is usually the loser - the company that offers a figure ends up paying higher than the worker would accept or the new workers ends up receiving less than could have been asked.

      It is true that interviewers often ask about salary up front in an attempt to pay the lowest possible for a job. So, a salary range is better to state than a fixed annual amount. However, if they insist on pinning you down to a figure, then state the mid-point of the range that you researched, or even a bit higher.

    • Kathleen Cochran profile image

      Kathleen Cochran 24 months ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      My understanding was that you didn't discuss money until you received an offer to take the job. Recently it seems they often ask what salary you expect as part of the interview. Is it acceptable, if they ask, to ask them in return what a similar job's salary range is? If you say you'll take $20/hr but they pay other employees $30/hr, they'll be more than willing to pay you less?

    • Shivali Sharma profile image

      the vibe 2 years ago from Delhi, India

      Thanks for sharing. I too think that one needs to keep the above things in mind while appearing for an interview.

    • AaronBurton profile image

      Aaron Burton 2 years ago from US

      Job interviews are tricky. Just show them your a leader and not afraid to make mistakes. The safer you try to be the less opportunities you will have.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 2 years ago from North America

      You may be right. Using email, facebook, texting, etc. sure is different from face-to-face interactions.

    • VJGSA profile image

      VJG 2 years ago from Texas

      I have conducted several job interviews due to my position as director, and this article would have benefited everyone who came before me seeking the job. Kids today don't know how to put their best foot forward. I blame it on the Internet (LOL).

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 2 years ago from North America

      Thanks for visiting!

    • dhimanreena profile image

      Reena Dhiman 2 years ago

      Voted up :)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 2 years ago from North America

      Ha ha :) -- That would be OK in Japan, where bosses in some companies often take their teams to the bar for dinner and then back to work!

    • robertzimmerman2 profile image

      Robert Zimmerman 2 years ago from SE Florida, USA

      So asking if there is a bar nearby is likely a bad idea, right :-) Great article!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 3 years ago from North America

      Hi Mel - I may have seen a lot, but I see even wierder things happening in interviews as I read the case studies of them in monthly trade publications. My jaw drops very time! Thanks for commenting!

    • Mel Carriere profile image

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      All of these items seem to fall into the category of "common sense," and I am amazed that anyone would commit such serious errors, but human nature never ceases to amaze me, and I am sure that you as an interviewer have seen it all and are even more perplexed than I am. Thank you for compiling this useful information.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 3 years ago from North America

      Thanks sincerely for reading an dposting a comment. These tips really work. For example, I hear from employers telling me every day that they do not like employees to ask about rate of pay too soon, so it's a continuing problem. As times change, other "dont's" may arise as well, or in place of some of these. .

    • carrie Lee Night profile image

      Kept private 3 years ago from Northeast United States

      Patty Inglish: Thank you for writing this hub and helping people to navigate their interview better :) I like hubs on common sense :) Have a wonderful weekend.

    • Cheeky Girl profile image

      Cassandra Mantis 3 years ago from UK and Nerujenia

      This is a great hub! Some really excellent job advice! Things to never say in an interview. Words for the wise job applicants.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 3 years ago from North America

      I'm sorry, but I do not quite understand the question. Can you add some releant information?

    • Ravi kant 3 years ago

      some company asks that if another company gives u more package than our company than what should we say to them

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 3 years ago from North America

      That's one of the first things I learned while having my first job interviews - not to talk too much or give too much information. Thanks for yur kind comment!

    • joym7 profile image

      Joy 3 years ago from United States

      Excellent work! This hub will definitely help aspirants in facing their interview. I like this point "Don't tell them your life story". You have done great work.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 3 years ago from North America

      I certainly hope that some of these ideas help you, vibesites! Interviews can be nerve wracking.

    • vibesites profile image

      vibesites 3 years ago from United States

      Thanks for your wonderful suggestions... my only mistake I think has been "None, none at all" whenever I'm asked if I have any questions. I will think of a good one so that I can show to my prospective employer that i am indeed interested to work for his/her company. Voted up, useful and shared.

    • Divyansh Ojha 4 years ago

      thanks for suggestions...they will help me when i will go out for my first interview after my engineering is done

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 4 years ago from North America

      Good suggestions! I have Hubs with several lists of questions myself, all gathered from real experiences and my teaching of Work Readiness and Interviewing classes.

    • Cathleena Beams profile image

      Cathleena Beams 4 years ago from Lascassas, Tennessee

      Very helpful hub on the "don't dos" during an interview. It is best to practice answering the questions you think may be asked on the interview ahead of time and have some examples in mind to plug in where applicable. The internet has a wealth of information available. You can search for performance based interview questions and study in advance for the real thing.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 4 years ago from North America

      A lot of people do so under Achievements, if they have won sales awards.

    • curious 4 years ago

      do you think that you should disclose how much you have sold for a company within a resume?

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 4 years ago from North America

      They would likely ask you that question themselves.

    • may 4 years ago

      in an academic interview for an admission, what are some questions that i should never ask? in order words, is it wrong to ask a panel to tell me how they would organize their research if they were students also in an interview

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 4 years ago from North America

      Masybe it's the stress and difference from a more normal conversation with a person. Interviewing puts one in the hot seat, for sure. I'm enjoying your comment - a story in itself! Very refreshing.

    • Ciel Clark profile image

      Ciel Clark 4 years ago from USA

      Number 8 gets me every time. My standard answer when I get the brain freeze for this particular question is, "Yes, I have some questions, but for now I'm good."

      Argh, lame. I don't know why this particular question stumps me. I know it is coming! The other questions, even the one about pay (whatever is the going rate) are easy, but for some reason this one gets me every time. Still, I figure I have applied for about 30 jobs (is this possible??) and have been turned down for two. One job that needed a lot of math skills (ha!) and the other one where I had a different kind of brain freeze and couldn't say how to explain the subjunctive to French students. Argh! I was hitting the heel of my hand to my forehead the whole subway ride home.

      What is different do you think about this particular question? I guess most of the interviewer's questions are about the interviewee, but questions about why I want to work for a particular company are easy to answer. Maybe too open ended? I agree with your above comments that a few prepared questions are key. I think I even have tried to do this, but still get the dreaded brain freeze..

    • ahmed elshaikh 5 years ago

      I am very wenderfull for all this Items . It seem to me as a great country not a group of some peaple like the internet and facbooke and hotmail . got bless you all to contenue you efforts

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      Much success to you in your employment seeking!

    • Ari 5 years ago

      I am doing a job hunt and I am mentally preparing myself. I hope to make a great impression in the upcoming job interviews. These key points are going to help me a lot. So, thank you very much, I greatly appreciate getting educated in proper and professional interview etiquette. Have a awesome new year.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      Cool! Her question seems innocent. Hope you get the job :)

    • Georges Herard 5 years ago

      Correct, it is French. She had a hard time pronouncing it at the end of the interview she said something like this "If you don't mind me asking, what nationality is your last name?"

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      Sounds French or Belgian to me. I wonder what nationality she thought it is?

    • Georges Herard 5 years ago

      Thanks Patty, I actually got my first job by following your advice.

      The interviewer did ask me what nationality my last name is, but I did tell her. I just didn't want to get her upset...

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      If the hospital bylaws do not require its nursing staff to be Catholic, or at least Christian, you probably do not have a problem in hiring. If they indicate nurses need be Christian, you do. Religious institutions are fully permitted to require that in my state and maybe yours. Faith-based hospital administrations can see faith as part of the healing process in daily work and as part of cultural competency in treating Catholics and other believers.

      If the hospital has a website, access it and look for indications that the treatment staff is Catholic or other denomination.

    • Thomas from AZ 5 years ago

      I just had an interview for a nursing position and everything went great except I made a small mistake. I accidentally stated my religious affiliation during the interview, I was applying at a Catholic Hospital...I said that I was not religious but I am very respectful to the role it plays in people's lives.

      All other aspects of the interview went great, I was confident and answered the questions with great responses.

      How bad was the mistake I made?

    • smarter4ever profile image

      smarter4ever 5 years ago from Wisconsin

      Great Hub! Can't wait to read more of your hubs!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      alphagirl - I am sorry to hear about this and I hear it and similar incidents much too often about interviews. It does seem that sometimes HR wants a worker without outside interests of any sort and that's unreasonable imo.

    • alphagirl profile image

      alphagirl 5 years ago from USA

      I remember interviewing at a furniture store( ethan Allen) and the manager asked me, "So what will you do with your children when you have to work past 7pm?" I was appalled. I thought the assumption was inappropriate. After the interview was over, I knew the company did support employees with families. I got the sense they wanted someone who had no life, except to work. Your hub has great tips.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      @meganismith3 - I've also interviewed people that thought they had only to clock in and clock out, but go elsewhere and do what they wanted during the day. They'd been watching soap operas and said the receptionists and their bosses all did this.

      Not a very good example of working, is it?

    • meganlsmith3 profile image

      meganlsmith3 5 years ago from Texas

      I appreciate you discussing the use of slang and simply being too casual. I taught high school for years and teenagers and young adults today think they should be able to dress and act "cool" all the time and that they should just be accepted for who they are. They don't understand the matter of giving respect to superiors and acting professional. Great Hub with lots of great information! Thanks.

    • random person 5 years ago

      great tips.

    • sathies ambeau 5 years ago

      thank you guys, that really help me out.

    • nsfjnjfnsd 5 years ago

      was #5 really necessary? don't most people already know not to say the n-word or 'hos' in an interview?

    • je 5 years ago

      I remember when I asked my employer if he's gonna hire me or not during the interview. I said in exact words, so you are not sure if you gonna hire me? hahaha I just got annoyed then because his interview was too long and it was not like an interview anymore because he was telling his life story to me to which im not interested to hear.

    • Naide Bowen 5 years ago

      I agree with alexpapa,I dont get hired because i dont have a degree,or certification but i make more than those average income who have degree or masters......

    • Isi 5 years ago

      Great!!!

    • Keith Matyi profile image

      Keith Matyi 5 years ago from Denton, TX

      Great story!

    • medical assistants 5 years ago

      Good site will lot of information and also the tips for the easy ways are also given. Good site with lot of good examples. Above Ground Pools |medical assistants

    • Robin L 5 years ago

      I love - love - love this hub page. It is filled with informative, interesting and helful information. . . .Its written just as well, if not better than a magazine article. The information is definitely enlightening. . . . Robin

    • moha 5 years ago

      thanks all, it is allot of knowledge

    • carcro profile image

      Paul Cronin 5 years ago from Winnipeg

      Really good tips, we have all been in that hot seat, and I'm sure have all made a few mistakes as noted in your hub. Wish I had this list when I was younger, but at least I can pass this along to my kids. Thanks for sharing!

    • Ross T. 5 years ago

      This article was very useful and reminded me of what not to say..I admit I have made the mistake of speaking negatively towards previous employers,but I know now not to do that for it will cost me a job

    • amy 5 years ago

      hi

      i enjoyed reading your comments from and too people just as much as your first part

      well done you that after 3 years your still at the top of google search and people are still reading and commenting on your work .

    • jsmith 5 years ago

      even though i already knew these tips its always nice to re read them over before you go on the interview. these are very helpful and come in mind when you need some help making a good impression. good luck to all of you.

    • mohammad qtatsheh 5 years ago

      So interesting and informative read ... Thanks

    • FeliciaM profile image

      FeliciaM 5 years ago from Canada

      Some great tips! Thanks!!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      We hope you get your dream job!

    • tom hellert profile image

      tom hellert 5 years ago from home

      Intrviewing today,

      good tips

      TH

    • Thami 5 years ago

      thank you for sharing these piece of advice it will be helpful for all job seekers!! :)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      It depends on what you don't understand. Sometimes, you can call up and ask the recpetionist your question ahead of time, or request the latest yearly public report that companies print. Do you have something specific in mind, Scott?

    • Scott 5 years ago

      Would you deem it acceptable to ask a question, say, if you did not understand an aspect of the company after you have done your research

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      interview preparation - it is good also to be professional after receiving the job! ;) Thanks for posting.

    • interview preparation 5 years ago

      I will keep this guides in my mind once I got to a job interview. Thanks for this great post. On a job interview you must be very professional even if you are not because you have to convince the interviewer to pick you.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

      These tips have always worked well for me, and employers have mentioned most of them when I have asked their opinion about interview questions that annoy. Thanks, Silver Poet!

    • Silver Poet profile image

      Silver Poet 5 years ago from the computer of a midwestern American writer

      Brilliant hub! We need more of this kind of thinking. When people plan ahead and have a little extra info, they should be able to do quite nicely on their interview.

      Excellent coaching!

    • Tammy Favata profile image

      Tammy Favata 5 years ago

      Great hub

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      It is illegal in America to ask an interviewee that question, but I have no clue as to why you actually were not hired. Did you happen to ask why you were not hired?

      However, if you answer one illegal question, it is an OK for the interviewer to press you on the subject and perhaps other illegal ones. An interviewer legally can only ask you about YOU, no one else - and unless it is a church or very similar, cannot ask about religion, gender, relationships, children, health, age (except "are you 18 or older?", ethnicity, heritage, or any demographics.

      If an interviewer is interested in schedule gaps caused by many crew people attending church on Wed, Thurs, and twice on Sunday, he/she should just ask you about your availability to work each day of the week. Now, if you say you cannot work on Wed nights and Sunday mornings, then he/she might assume you go to church. Same applies to other days of worship for other faiths.

    • Robin k 6 years ago

      I was interviewing for a fast food position. I was asked if i attended church, I said no. I did not get the job. Is that illegal?

    • Trish_M profile image

      Tricia Mason 6 years ago from The English Midlands

      I once attended an interview, which was going really well. I was young and naïve at the time and, when the interviewer implied that I was what they were looking for, I replied with something like ~ 'Really?! Do you think so? I wasn't sure that I could do this!' Needless to say, I did not get the job!!! :) :) :)

    • Vinícius 6 years ago

      Very good informative. I'll need it!

    • wt1s3rv3r profile image

      wt1s3rv3r 6 years ago

      Good post! very informative hub....

    • Neverletitgo profile image

      Neverletitgo 6 years ago from Minneapolis, MN

      Patty, your hub is good.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      I suppose saying "none" means that one does not do any self-examination to find any (?). Thanks for the comment, nathanaelig.

    • nathanaelig profile image

      nathanaelig 6 years ago from Burlingame, CA

      Hi, Patty,

      I must say, as a new hubber, I'm really impressed with the many topics you write on. I like your advice about never saying you have no weaknesses! So true. I used to interview people and almost laughed at those who said it. Even saying "I am a perfectionist" is lame, but better than nothing!!!

    • D.Virtual.Doctor profile image

      Funom Theophilus Makama 6 years ago from Europe

      This is an excellent hub...

      WHAT TO SAY IN A JOB INTERVIEW

      Tell me about yourself.

      My background to date has been centered around preparing myself to become the very best _____ I can become. Let me tell you specifically how I've prepared myself . . .

      Why should I hire you?

      Because I sincerely believe that I'm the best person for the job. I realize that there are many other college students who have the ability to do this job. I also have that ability. But I also bring an additional quality that makes me the very best person for the job--my attitude for excellence. Not just giving lip service to excellence, but putting every part of myself into achieving it. In _____ and _____ I have consistently reached for becoming the very best I can become by doing the following . . .

      What is your long-range objective? Where do you want to be 10 or 15 years from now?

      Although it's certainly difficult to predict things far into the future, I know what direction I want to develop toward. Within five years, I would like to become the very best _____ your company has. In fact, my personal career mission statement is to become a world-class _____ in the _____ industry. I will work toward becoming the expert that others rely upon. And in doing so, I feel I will be fully prepared to take on any greater responsibilities that might be presented in the long term.

      How has your education prepared you for your career?

      As you will note on my resume, I've taken not only the required core classes in the _____ field, I've also gone above and beyond. I've taken every class the college has to offer in the field and also completed an independent study project specifically in this area. But it's not just taking the classes to gain academic knowledge--I've taken each class, both inside and outside of my major, with this profession in mind. So when we're studying _____ in _____, I've viewed it from the perspective of _____. In addition, I've always tried to keep a practical view of how the information would apply to my job. Not just theory, but how it would actually apply. My capstone course project in my final semester involved developing a real-world model of _____, which is very similar to what might be used within your company. Let me tell you more about it . . .

      Are you a team player?

      Very much so. In fact, I've had opportunities in both athletics and academics to develop my skills as a team player. I was involved in _____ at the intramural level, including leading my team in assists during the past year--I always try to help others achieve their best. In academics, I've worked on several team projects, serving as both a member and team leader. I've seen the value of working together as a team to achieve a greater goal than any one of us could have achieved individually. As an example . . .

      Have you ever had a conflict with a boss or professor? How was it resolved?

      Yes, I have had conflicts in the past. Never major ones, but certainly there have been situations where there was a disagreement that needed to be resolved. I've found that when conflict occurs, it's because of a failure to see both sides of the situation. Therefore, I ask the other person to give me their perspective and at the same time ask that they allow me to fully explain my perspective. At that point, I would work with the person to find out if a compromise could be reached. If not, I would submit to their decision because they are my superior. In the end, you have to be willing to submit yourself to the directives of your superior, whether you're in full agreement or not. An example of this was when . . .

      What is your greatest weakness?

      I would say my greatest weakness has been my lack of proper planning in the past. I would overcommit myself with too many variant tasks, then not be able to fully accomplish each as I would like. However, since I've come to recognize that weakness, I've taken steps to correct it. For example, I now carry a planning calendar in my pocket so that I can plan all of my appointments and "to do" items. Here, let me show you how I have this week planned out . . .

      If I were to ask your professors to describe you, what would they say?

      I believe they would say I'm a very energetic person, that I put my mind to the task at hand and see to it that it's accomplished. They would say that if they ever had something that needed to be done, I was the person who they could always depend on to see that it was accomplished. They would say that I always took a keen interest in the subjects I was studying and always sought ways to apply the knowledge in real world settings. Am I just guessing that they would say these things? No, in fact, I'm quite certain they would say those things because I have with me several letters of recommendation from my professors, and those are their very words. Let me show you . . .

      What qualities do you feel a successful manager should have?

      The key quality should be leadership--the ability to be the visionary for the people who are working under them. The person who can set the course and direction for subordinates. A manager should also be a positive role model for others to follow. The highest calling of a true leader is inspiring others to reach the highest of their abilities. I'd like to tell you about a person who I consider to be a true leader . . .

      If you had to live your life over again, what would you change?

      That's a good question. I realize that it can be very easy to continually look back and wish that things had been different in the past. But I also realize that things in the past cannot be changed, that only things in the future can be changed. That's why I continually strive to improve myself each and every day and that's why I'm working hard to continually increase my knowledge in the _____ field. That's also the reason why I want to become the very best _____ your company has ever had. To make positive change. And all of that is still in the future. So in answer to your question, there isn't anything in my past that I would change. I look only to the future to make changes in my life.

      In reviewing the above responses, please remember that these are sample answers. Please do not rehearse them verbatim or adopt them as your own. They are meant to stir your creative juices and get you thinking about how to properly answer the broader range of questions that you will face.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      Zeba Neighba - yes, do not say that.

    • zeba 6 years ago

      hey wazzzzzz up

    • Sofia 6 years ago

      haha definitely agree on that. I just didn't want to come across as unprofessional or not taking the interview seriously! thanks for the advice!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      Dentistry could use some more humor, Sofia! Probably not the slapstick type during the interview (LOL), but something cute and witty.

    • Sofia 6 years ago

      Great article! Very informative thanks for this. Do you think it's ok to bring humour into interviews? The job I have an interview for i think needs a certain element of humour (its in the dental field) but don't want to seem unprofessional. But on the other hand do want to show my sense of humour.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      At that position, it looks to me that you learned more about and obtained practical experience in reorganizing and streaming a business, follow-up, attention to detail, policy compliance and what occurs when it is not done, troubleshooting, and others. You learned a lot about how things do not run well and what should be done about it. That's all positive, even if you learned more about it in a negative version of the business.

      Best wishes.

    • gypsie_queen profile image

      gypsie_queen 6 years ago

      I have 1 question in my recent interviews that just stumps me, I have nothing good to say about my previous boss who I worked very closely with as one of his head managers. I was basiclly black balled out after as he called it "cleaned house" & got everything functioning as it was suppose to, & he had a big problem with me as a peron in general(being a women, minor health issue & religious beliefs). But it's the line of business I'm in there is no room for error & he would constantly ignore policy and procedures because he didn't want to deal with it or it would bring in more money. So me bringing issues to his attention that where serious & did need addresed it would bother him.He actually told me at one piont when another employee had mixed up pt's and reported out the results,I was waisting his time & to get out of his office.(Well when he had the final say I had to go to him,other wise I wouldn't have.)So how do I find something positive to say about him?

    • shubham 6 years ago

      a very useful post..

      a succint and well written post which is going to be fruitful to many

    • summerblue profile image

      summerblue 6 years ago from Austin, Tx

      UGH on the Sense of Entitlement with today's 20 year old (not all of course) but lots do.

    • Jennifer Lynch profile image

      Jennifer Lynch 6 years ago from Stowmarket, Suffolk.

      This is extremely useful. Thanks

    • Muhammad Waqas 6 years ago

      Thees tips are very very usefull for me. Thanks alot

    • Ambition398 profile image

      Ambition398 6 years ago

      GOod tips! My tip to add: Keep your comment brief, to the point - -and focused on how someone else benefited from your efforts, too. Don't be all "me, me, me " focused.

    • MaryRenee 6 years ago

      Patty: What an excellent hub! We all can use helpful tips like these, thanks so much for sharing! :)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      @Sunnyglitter - The last woman was really in a fix, wasn't she, if it was completely true? You are correct, though, you cannot professionally hire a candidate out of sympathy.

      True story - A secretary in a large company where I worked broke many regulations and actually refused to perform any duties on the job for weeks on end. Supervisors kept her own out of sympathy for her child. She quit and the company eliminated the position since she had done no work so often, and the supervisors were required to increase their own workloads with clerical duties as the clientelle increased.

    • Sunnyglitter profile image

      Sunnyglitter 6 years ago from Cyberspace

      I like to write a lot of articles on careers and interview procedures, so I really enjoyed this. It was very well-written and thorough. As a former hiring manager, I can say that it was also very accurate-especially the part about not telling your life story. I can't tell you how many interviews I've done where the applicant told me the gruesome details of their divorce, baby mama, etc. I had one applicant tell me that she wanted the job because she had 8 kids and lived in a motel. While I felt bad for her, sympathy doesn't always equal employment.

    • Jasejames profile image

      Senadheera Jayakody 6 years ago from Gampaha, Sri Lanka

      Very interesting and much appreciated

    • susanlang profile image

      susanlang 6 years ago

      Thanks--- and I'm sure you have a loving and wonderful family as well! As nice a person you are here--on the hubs, I would be shocked to find out I'm wrong. :)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      Mark and you have such a lovely relationship that it always makes me smile to think about you. Happy holiday!

    • susanlang profile image

      susanlang 6 years ago

      Patty-- thanks for the oil update-- based on what you said, looks like the Electric Co. may have some rate changes to think about. I'll watch your hubs for any BP oil mess updates. Patty-- Mark and I wish you a very happy holiday also!

    • susanlang profile image

      susanlang 6 years ago

      Patty- good information related to new oil jobs- sounds like oil may give electric a run for the money ;) I'll watch your hubs for any updates. Happy holiday Patty to you and yours' as well!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      Hi Susan - The oil related jobs are growing in New Town, North Dakota and the surrounding area, where 39 oil wells are under contruction for 2010 (about quadruple new wells over the number they have now). Engineers estimate oil reserves enough to support all of North America for decades.

      I don't know about this BP oil horror, but I'll look at the gulf coast and offshore jobs soon. Happy holiday Susan to you and your husband!

    • susanlang profile image

      susanlang 6 years ago

      You hit the target yet again in posting this hub, Patty. I'm sure you know that. For many looking to find a job, hope the market picks up soon! Have you done a hub on the massive oil mishap yet? I bet that will create jobs for many with the clean up needed! However, not the kind of jobs one would wish for. Good hub Patty.

    • jojo29 6 years ago

      I think these are very good information for us who are looking for a job.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      Well, things change and change again , don't they? Congratulations on your job, Nicole -- You must have a terrific life story!

    • nicole 6 years ago

      Haha, this is funny because my interviewer did want to know my life story, lol. But that was a first. And I got the job:)

    • moncrieff profile image

      moncrieff 6 years ago from New York, NY

      Good points delivered in compact form.

    • coachb51 profile image

      coachb51 6 years ago from West Point, MS

      This is very valid information as I have been interviewing to hire others in my company, I see many people are lacking in these skills and do and say all of the wrong things.

      One wrong thing can cause loss of consideration, even though you may be qualified for this job.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      Hi Audre - You were able to ask the question, see a repsonse, and we can all learn from it. Glad you had the bank job, too. Thanks!

    • audrey 6 years ago

      when I was single and looking for my FIRST job I went to MANY job interviews and in each one they asked me if I had experience. So when I heard that i had been accepted at a bank I still went to a scheduled interview and when asked the dreaded question I replied 'How can i gain experience if i have never been given the chance to gain it! Sure enough they didn't call me back but I had my bank job.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 6 years ago from North America

      I'm pretty sure I lost a job when I answered a question about a former employer; I was not particularly tactful in those days.

    • boggledash profile image

      boggledash 6 years ago from Saudi Arabia

      What you have written in your hub is really commonsense, yet I wonder how many of us have actually lost jobs through not being alert and made some of those mistakes. It will certainly make me think at my next interview! - Thanks

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      I have a sense that they might illegally deny you the job for having 4 children, anyway, because kids almost ensure sick days and energencies will be taken off -- You likely have the need to leave work ON TIME to prepare dinner, take kids to appointments, etc. Some employers want workers that stay late and come in on weekends without additional pay and families interfere with that.

      Once you start answering any illegal questions, you allow an interviewer to ask others. Don't answer answer any of them, but use tact as I've indicated.

      You could say that you know the questions are illegal and that might end the interview on the spot.

    • Irish Duchess profile image

      Irish Duchess 7 years ago

      Won't it make me less likely to be considered if I basically refuse to answer a questions such as that. I've had them get pretty aggressive about it and I know my ex got denied a job because of a big family.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      @Irish Duchess - The standard recommendation is that you say that you will inform the company of marriage status, kids, family, health, age, and such after you are hired.

    • Irish Duchess profile image

      Irish Duchess 7 years ago

      I wish potential employers would not ask you the personal questions that they're not supposed to. I can't tell you how many interviews I've been asked if I have kids or am married. I'm in the job market again and now I have four kids and I really don't want to answer that question about children because I know the reaction to having four. How do you deal with that?

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      Nothing, apparently :)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      What would you like to see, Peter?

    • Peter Moses 7 years ago

      This article is perhaps a good one for college students preparing for the very first interview in their lives. For seasoned interviewers there is little value add. wish there was something more insightful. i am bored of reading the same thing in every article on interviewing

    • saurabhpande 7 years ago

      I am very fortunate to read this hub as i am on my graduation threshold and seeking a job. Thank you very much.

    • TheLadders profile image

      TheLadders 7 years ago from New York

      Thanks for covering this subject; the greatest anxiety of any job applicant is how to answer difficult questions (some of which should never be asked in the first place and some are now illegal to ask). I know every applicant wants to ask about the salary and benefits, but your advice to focus on what you bring to the company in the first interview is very important. As you note, it’s also key to prepare for common but potentially awkward questions, such as “What weaknesses do you have?”

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      cjcarter! - People that stay with Disneyland and Disneyworld love it there. They say it is another world. In writing about college internships at Disney, I found many Youtube testimonials about the work. Some people work there in high school and college, go to another career, retire and come back and keep working the rest of their lives at Disneyland.

      Admission to Disneyland just went up to $79 for adults, so let's see how that impacts their business.

    • cjcarter profile image

      cjcarter 7 years ago

      I feel like if my life were a cartoon, my jaw would have just hit the floor with an accompaniment of whirling alarm sounds and other warning noises...

      All in all, seems like you have come a long way from the whips of the sales reps. My dream job is to either work for a non profit organization or Disney. Stay tuned and keep your fingers crossed for me : )

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      Let me know if I can help in any way.

      When I first graduated, I'd had a dual major, several useful minors and research experience, along with 6 years of work experience - some supervisory -  and was offered minimum wage jobs by employment agencies by commission driven reps (for them, fast placement or fired). I was stunned.  

    • cjcarter profile image

      cjcarter 7 years ago

      So, in a nutshell, college graduates need to be masters of the universe...

      I found this article extremely informative and you can bet I'll be bookmarking it. I will be graduating with a bachelors degree in business administration this coming spring, and I'll be joining the other thousands of job seekers. Thanks for all the advice.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      naruhodo! - Yes, quite true and I'm glad you mentioned it.

      I (as interviewer) once had an applicant in a resturant chain not only ask for a pen, but for me to fill out his application. Another one handed me a resume on spiral notebook papper with the ragged edge falling apart, and another gave me one folded up and dirty. I wondered what planet I was on that day.

    • naruhodo 7 years ago

      I know this isn't something you should say or not but you should always bring a pencil and a pen to an interview... I mean just think if the interviewer asked you to write something down and you had to borrow a pen...

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      Hi Haunty - Yes, look at the published salary ranges for your area at Salary.com and use that type of range.

      On a resume, do not list any personal info at all like: date of birth, physical characteristics, hobbies, religious or political affiliations and clubs, etc. It should not affect an interview call back at all.

    • Haunty profile image

      Haunty 7 years ago from Hungary

      Thanks for the great advice, Patty.

      I was taught in college that if the interviewer asks how much I want I have to ask about the benefits and then adjust my figure reasonably. Is it better to just tell them a range for the salary outright?

      Also, if I don't want them to know my age, can I leave my date of birth out of my resume? What are my chances of getting called in for any interview in this case?

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      One could state that the workplace did not offer opportunities for career advancement (an unhealthy one certainly does not) and the work and oneself were not suited to each other, not a close match. That's pretty generic, but reporting an official Health and Safety Violation to a new potential employer against another company is whistleblowing in the wrong direction and a sign of future disloyalty (even when employers are in violation and you are, indeed, loyal). The potential employer might also take the stance that there was actually no violation and you are fabricating, no matter what was true.

      Readers, report any Health and Safety issues to your supervisor and then HR if you receive no action. If still no action or they refuse to remedy, you should report it to the State Occupational and Health authority if this is a private business.  In my state, non-profits are not covered by this set of laws. Check with your state.

    • Staci-Barbo7 profile image

      Staci-Barbo7 7 years ago from North Carolina

      Patty, I was raised to be honest and open, but I agree, sometimes it hurts to be too open in an interview.  It can give the wrong impression, since the interviewer may focus on one or two 'negatives' you mention in response to a question in the interview. 

      When I was looking for a job a few years ago and interviewers asked why I left my former employer, I let them know it was due to a mold issue in the workplace that made me ill, resulting in my doctor strongly recommending that I leave the job.  It was the truth, but it put off potential employers.  They may have thought I might have health issues that would interfere with my job performance.  In a situation like this, what approach would you recommend to the jobseeker?  

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      I have interviewed for a few jobs where the interview process was very tough and even nonsensical, imo. As an interviewer, a few of those experiences were even worse. Currently, I am hearing about some odd occurrences on both sides of the interverview desk and do not understand them all.

      Thanks for the comments, cashmere!

    • cashmere profile image

      cashmere 7 years ago from India

      Amazingly astute tips that would work beautifully well in an interview. This is an amazing hub. I can tell that you have been through some horrendous interviews in real life.

    • someonewhoknows profile image

      someonewhoknows 7 years ago from south and west of canada,north of ohio

      This is my tribute to all self rightious individuals Rich and poor alike!

      A conversation between God and a potential Angel!

      God : i know your qualified for the job,what is your motivation!

      Angel : l've been training for this job forever!

      God : I know,but why do you want this job?

      Angel : I want to help the old,poor,and lame,as well as,

      the rich,young and healthy!

      God : Ok,but just remember,the last thing we need is,

      a decent middleclass!

      Angel : That's strange,that's what the Devel told me,

      when I saw him last!

      God : You got to keep better company!

    • suppee profile image

      suppee 7 years ago from Cheshire, England

      great tips! Its easy to get carried away - its knowing what to do and what not to say and do thats so good to know. . I love the cartoon aswell...

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      Word+ - How do I get the content?? - I LIVED it. I was in charge of hiring, training, promoting, evaluating, firing workers for several years in different industries. All these materials are from my experiences and similar programs I wrote for a govt-funded agency that went out of business.

      One job candidate even put his feet up on my desk, as in the first picture. I've seen and heard some odd things as well as some good things.

    • WordWielder profile image

      WordWielder 7 years ago from Austin

      Thanks, this was an informative, thoroughly researched hub! Also, I'm impressed with how much related materials you incorporated into your hub. How and where do you get all of the content to add to hubs? Mine are empty text. I know this is not desirable but I'm always worried about uploading material onto my hub that requires permission. Anyway, great stuff. Your life "resume" is pretty impressive as well. Keep it up! Feel free to check out my hubs and join my club!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      That's true, Debby, and moreso in the last couple of years. Some of the social networking sites allow one to block one's profile from the public, but it is sill wise not to place much personal information on them.

      I cringe when I see folks placing family and personal information on these sites.

      Thanks for you input!

    • Debby Bruck profile image

      Debby Bruck 7 years ago

      Hi Patty~ Excellent as usual. I STUMBLED-UPON this article. It is so necessary in these economic times that people know how to present themselves. There is only one problem with Item #10. All your personal information on your Social Network Sites are available for employers to view. They don't need to directly ask religious affiliation, whether you have kids, hobbies, etc. That information can be found without asking. The world is transparent, less privacy these days. Have a blessed day, Debby

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      jenny008 - thanks for the visit and good comments!

      Zac - it helps to know the cause of your distraction, but in some cases, a set of relaxation exercises the night before and early the morning of the interview helps. If you practicew these daily, in fact, with a physical cue like toughing two fingers together - after a week or so, the touching of the fingers together brings the focus you need as a result of conditioning.

      Now, for folks that drink a lot of coffee or cola before an interview, that's simpler to handle.

      Any idea why you are distracted, or not?

    • Zac 7 years ago

      I really found this to be very informative. Thank you. Would you happen to have any basic advice for someone who is very easily distracted? I've got a rather bad problem with that.

    • jenny008 8 years ago

      brilliant hub, informative and accurate ..yhx

    • DarinM profile image

      DarinM 8 years ago

      good advice thank you for writing this

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Dorsi, I really hope this helps your friend. This one and the 100 top interview questions and the Followup for interviews Hubs should help a lot.

      Best Wishes to you both..

      Patty

    • Dorsi profile image

      Dorsi Diaz 8 years ago from The San Francisco Bay Area

      Excellent Hub Patty. I have a dear friend that has been doing interviews and needs some help in the interviewing dept. so I'm going to forward this to her.

      Another good friend once told me you only have one chance to make a first impression and that is so important especially when interviewing for a job!

      Thanks again for the wise advice!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Just glad to be able to share info readers might not find elsewhere. Thanks, Lgali!

    • Lgali profile image

      Lgali 8 years ago

      Good advice, U are the best in hubbers community

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Surely, go ahead and use it [just don't sell it :) ]

      I did the same type of work weith in-school and out-of school youth; used this material there as well - worked pretty well. 

    • maven101 profile image

      maven101 8 years ago from Northern Arizona

      Great Hub...An informative read that keeps on giving, and giving, and giving. I note comments from 2 years ago.

      I have a part-time job working with recovering adolescent substance abusers. I help prepare them for the outside world by showing them how to do their taxes, interview for jobs, prepare applications for apartment rentals, employment, credit lines, etc.

      Would you mind if I use your Hub, in toto, as a part of my curricula ?

    • mariane14 profile image

      mariane14 8 years ago from USA

      nice hub

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      SpotCoolStuff - Now THAT'S an answer! Truly, I have sometimes felt like using it.

    • SpotCoolStuff.com profile image

      SpotCoolStuff.com 8 years ago from San Francisco, CA USA

      #11 Answer every question by saying "Darned if I know"

      Nice, useful, hub.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Tese thigns aprticularly should be taught beginning in middle school; it would certainly help the youth and the business world, especially in the first job. Thanks for commenting!

    • agnesgriffins profile image

      agnesgriffins 8 years ago from Philippines

      Very Intereting topic and useful.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thanks for the support!

    • rethansmith 8 years ago

      This information accurately reflects what I learned in my Business Communications course.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      I write down 5 pertinent questions before my interview on a 5" x 8" card and bring it out when they ask me if I have any questions. That way I remember and also show them that I used planning for the interview.

      What do you think? Would that work?

    • Whitey profile image

      Whitey 8 years ago from Oswego, IL

      I always freeze when they ask me if I have any questions. Always! Also, I'm pretty bad about not using slang.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      I think that is a good decision. Also present yourself as positively as possible, as the best potential candidate for the job.

      Success!

    • greathub profile image

      greathub 8 years ago from Earth

      thank you.

      i would talk about positive things abvout myself and my classmates.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      It's a weeding-out-trick if they really ask about your friend or classmate -- If you say negatives, they will automatically not hire you and not your friend as well -- TWO DOWN, let's weed out some more, sort of thing. Just say good things about yourself.

      I brought an a panel interview from 8 people to a stop once, when I said good things about another applicant, when asked. They did not know what to say.

      Good success to you!

    • greathub profile image

      greathub 8 years ago from Earth

      what if interviewer asks: "Why should I hire you and not your friend (classmate or aquaintance who has come for interview as well)?"

      I mean if he/she asks for reasons.

      As an answer to the above question is it OK to tell anything negative(but pure truth) however small or large it may be in terms of negativity, about the classmate?

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      I hope they like it, too. Thanks for visiting!

    • Juliet Christie profile image

      Juliet Christie Murray 8 years ago from Sandy Bay Jamaica

      I like this. The cartoon is amusing. My students need this I must send them here

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      'Be yourself and professional' - I like that, spryte!

    • spryte profile image

      spryte 8 years ago from Arizona, USA

      Great advice! I used to sweat job interviews too, until I realized that an interview is simply a way of getting to know each other and seeing if it's a good fit. Nobody wants to work in a place they are uncomfortable and that means honesty goes a long way toward finding just the right job. Be yourself, but be professional.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Nicole, it is great these things are helping you - if there is anything I can help you with, do not hesitate to ask!

      Patty

    • Nicole Winter profile image

      Nicole A. Winter 8 years ago from Chicago, IL

      Ms. Inglish, thank-you so much for your excellent articles on interviewing and job hunting. This is very relevant to me, right now, & I just wanted to let you know how much I've appreciated reading them. I've learned a lot reading your articles & I know with some preserverance & the information you've provided me I *will* find a job!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thank you - Interesting name you have there, mosq!

    • mosquito catcher profile image

      mosquito catcher 8 years ago from Houma,Louisiana

      Great advice keep up the good work.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thanks for reading and then offering more useful advise, Lexica!

    • Lexica profile image

      Lexica 8 years ago from Germany

      Wow, what a great hub, full of on-topic information and so well presented.My top interview tip is to research the company as thoroughly as possible beforehand and memorize a few interesting facts. If possible ask the interviewer a question during the interview including the information you gleened. This shows you have spent time familiarizing yourself with the company and puts the interviewer on the spot as he has to answer your question too. For example: "I read that this company was founded in October,2006. Did you sell X product line from the onset or did you develop it subsequently?"

      This might be a bit Machiavellian but it works!

    • morrisonspeaks profile image

      morrisonspeaks 8 years ago

      very useful tips for jobseekers. although, when you are out there, you can hardly remember all of the tip. still it is good to be prepared.

    • SunyFB profile image

      SunyFB 8 years ago from USA

      This was fantastic information!

    • _Aaron_ profile image

      _Aaron_ 8 years ago from California

      Very nice info! I think working on my slang would be the top of my list.

    • miss fashionista profile image

      miss fashionista 8 years ago from PI

      wow this is actually very informative, i have had some of the tips in our carrer advancement back in high school but they missed out some points and thanks for the information,.. im currently looking for a new job, and am hoping that this new tips will come quite handy ;)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thanks for the employer's perspective, Joel; it's very good to have it here.

    • Joel McDonald profile image

      Joel McDonald 8 years ago from Denver, Colorado

      "Do not criticize any former employer."

      That's a great one. i once interviewed someone who seemed like a GREAT candidate... Until I asked her about her last job. It seemed that all of her problems were her manager's fault. Same with the one before.

      No thanks. The last thing we need is someone in our company who blames everything on everyone else.

      Thumbs up article!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Haha - Do well in your new job Vince Samios! - You have a good sense of humor.

    • VinceSamios 8 years ago from Australia

      Yo - Caniava job? tank bossy poo!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Yes, greathub, you are right - intoxication can trigger odd behaviors.

      Also FOOD can be a trigger of another kind. There are some people in our country that play control games with food - not providing enough for their families on purpose, or over-feeding their children purposely until a 2 year old ways over 120 pounds. Sometimes parents set up a binge-purge cycle in their children without realizing it -- they feed kids during the week and then refuse to make food on the weekends and sometimes the refrigerator is empty then too. Then I know college students that work in restaurnts and because th efood is free there, eat only on the days they work - 4 or 5 days a week; that might be bad as well. Lots of food goes to waste here, too, while people starve. That's odd to me. Ohio has six years of corn crops standing in silos. Merchants are tyirng to sell the 2007 crop now, and people are not buying it - it looks bad.

      I see that people who play control games with food, sex, or money have a mental disorder and/or abusive behavior. I also see all of those things come into play in some restaurants here BIG TIME. Hunger and sex are basic drives that can be distrupted - throw in money and a restaurant and KABOOM!

      Thanks for posting, greathub.

    • greathub profile image

      greathub 8 years ago from Earth

      Yes, restaurant business can be very different from others. Its because restaurants are where communication takes place apart from meals.

      I think many odd behaviours are triggered by intoxication, in your part of world. Isn't it?

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Hi greathub - it seems that one must have always one part of the mind alert for strange behaviors in people when one sees and deals with so many in the restaurant business. I have plenty of odd stories from those years. :)

    • greathub profile image

      greathub 8 years ago from Earth

      Very amazing indeed.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      greathub! - Yes!! -- When I was a restaurant manager, one man about age 38 sat this way (actually WORSE) and insisted that I hire him. Very rude and pushy and would not leave. Told me I should immediately buy him clothing and shoes as well. Long story shortened, I finally called Security to escort him out.  Amazing, is it not?

      Sapphire Eclipse - Thanks for posting! Sometimes during interviews, I simply "draw a blank."  Then I ask that the question be repeated. Once I could not think of anything to say and said, "I just don't have an answer for that."

    • Sapphire Eclipse profile image

      Sapphire Eclipse 8 years ago from Japan

      All 10 tips are very important but 'bashing a former employer' and 'telling your life story' seems to happen a lot because it's not always obvious what the repercussions could be. During an interview a few years ago, I got really nervous and just started to ramble on in answer to the questions until I forgot why I was in that office in the first place!

      Very useful hub for avoiding making these mistakes and having a pleasant interview!

    • greathub profile image

      greathub 8 years ago from Earth

      I want to know from your experience whether there are people in real life who would be bold/rude enough to sit as depicted in the picture under the heading : "An Improper Presentation" of your hub.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Your and your brother's experiences are valuable here. Thanks for posting. :)

    • greathub profile image

      greathub 8 years ago from Earth

      Thanks for appreciating my comment. I learn a lot from your articles.

      Pakistani job scene is just like what I have mentioned. I think my brother who went for interview was also suggested not to disclose his plans of MS else they wouldn't hire you because they would fear that you would just go away and all their trainning would go to waste.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Hello greathub! I beleive that what you are saying is something very good to think about. Many empoloyers might be leery of the advbanced degree person then running off to another company - and of needing to pay higher wages to someoone with a degee --

      Some companies require an employee that is studying for a degree to sign an agreement to work with that company for a total of an additional 3 or 5 years after receiving that degree, especially if the company is helping to pay for it, but even if they are not --

      Here - I don't know about other states - teachers must earn a masters degree in order to work more than 10 years total as a teacher.

      I also see that master's level salaries have declined since GW Bush took office, but are rising slightly since 2006. Still a master's degree can be a poroblem for certain employers - I know form expereince.

      Same thing with some freelance writing though - what paid $10 in 2006 now pays only 2.00.

      Thanks so much for posting this insight of yours!

    • greathub profile image

      greathub 8 years ago from Earth

      I have heard another thing. One should not let your prospective employer know that you have plans for a master's degree, if u have a bachelor's degree, in near future.

      Its because they don't want to hire again and again.

      Hiring a person having plans for such endeavour would waste their time cuz he/she wud run away in a few months.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thank you white atlantic! I'm glad you dropped in and made a comment. :)

    • white atlantic profile image

      white atlantic 8 years ago from INDIA

      thank patty for this nice info

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thank you VERY much, friends - it's good to see what works for others! Glad this Hub can help. I look forward to reading all of yours as well.

      Patty

    • Junkster profile image

      Junkster 8 years ago from Liverpool, UK

      Number one and two were very relevant when I was helping in hiring my replacement when on a placement at university. If a candidate hadn't researched the company or at least understood what field we were in then they wer einstantly out of the running.

      I think you're right because if you don't show an interest in the company you are applying for then it definitely won't make them think you care more about them than any other employer. showing an interest in the company i'm interviewing for has always left a good impression on interviewers

    • shotgunbanjo profile image

      shotgunbanjo 8 years ago

      for job seekers plz read this...this can help you in the future!!! if you dont get hired at first, then dont get lose try again and get reminded of this things....rock on^_^

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thanks for your experiences, alexpapa. I agree that Mid-Career, job seekers need to more assertively ask for what they are worth.

      I think that the FIRST thing any applicant says during the interview, though, should not be, "How much does the job pay?" While interviewing and hiring in the past, I have always told the applicant right then and there that we have nothing further to discuss, and why.

      Thanks again.

    • alexpapa profile image

      alexpapa 8 years ago

      As for asking about money and benefits, I have to disagree with you.

      Since graduating and starting my career 8 years ago I have doubled my salary almost four times over because I have never been shy about telling prospective companies what I am worth to them and asking what they are willing to give me for my hard work and expertise.

      But it does depend on your level of career, if it is your first job out of school and you have no experience you are not really in the position. But, once you are looking for your third or fourth job you have a little more backing behind you.

      I also appreciate it when people ask these questions when I am interviewing them, it's sets the expectations way up front.

      A lot of companies try to get away with paying someone according to THEIR past experience instead of a market related salary, I wouldn't suggest wanting to work for this kind of company anyway.

      After all, you are going to be doing work for them, you should know EXACTLY what they are willing to give you as early as possible.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Very good advice, WC! Thanks for adding it here.

    • WeddingConsultant profile image

      WeddingConsultant 8 years ago from DC Metro Area

      Great hub Patty. I would add to #9 that not only should you share a weakness (or "opportunity") but you would do well to explain how you are coping with that weakness and/or what you're doing to leverage it with a strength.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Hi clickbankformula! Thanks for contributing a good comment.

       Before the Internet became popular, a staffnig agency sent me to interview for a job. I asked the agency about the employer and my staffing counseliong said they did not know anything about them (Oh no!). No time to go to the library, because the interview was immediately.  I went to the intervew and was embarrassed by asking what the company did or made. The interviewer was very nice about it, and I was not qualified for the job. But it was all good experience for learning about interviews.  

    • clickbankformula profile image

      clickbankformula 8 years ago from Thailand

      cool tips for interview

      "What does your company make" I can't agree more.

      And for this one "How much does the job pay?" this one is not a must too but instead you should tell the amount when you were ask how much the salary you are expecting

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      I hope this Hub helps you and your contacts a whole lot of success, Gems4Friends!

    • Gems4friends 8 years ago from Spokane, WA

      Yet another commenter who wishes he'd read your tips before interviewing! Thanks for the hub and I'm going to pass it on to a couple of people.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      yilorco - Thanks so much for the comment.

      greathub - Thanks for letting me know! - I've corrected them.

    • greathub profile image

      greathub 8 years ago from Earth

      the links which you have mentoned under the heading links to success are not working. please fix them.

    • yllorco 8 years ago

      It's really helpful. it opens my mind to some forgotten bad habits.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Hi Anamika S! I hacvwe made a few of the mistakes listed in this Hub as well, before I was taught not to make them. LOL. Thanks very much for reading and commenting.

    • Anamika S profile image

      Anamika S 8 years ago from Mumbai - Maharashtra, India

      Very Informative and useful Hub! I also have made 1-2 mistakes you have listed out here. Thanks a lot for the info and a 'thumbs up' to you.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      I think I am just about ready to do just that, bluerabbit. Thanks very much for the encouragement. It means a lot.

    • bluerabbit profile image

      bluerabbit 8 years ago

      Fantastic! You should develop this into a how-to book,

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thanks mkgjunior and DJ Funktual! Body language is very important, to be sure.

      DJ - hope you're doing well.

    • DJ Funktual profile image

      DJ Funktual 8 years ago from One Nation Under a Groove

      Wow, that is some fantastic advice! Thanks Patty

    • mkgjunior profile image

      mkgjunior 8 years ago from Kota Kinabalu, Sabah Malaysia

      Good tips and in most cases candidates failed in item 7 above. As HR Practitioner, the body language and level of confidence will tell what type of candidates you are facing in the interview

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      seamus, it's good to investigate the website of the company to see iof they list salary ranges. Even call HR and ask. OR, go to DOL.gov and research salary ranges in your field of work and then choose a salary range slightly higher than that and quote that to the Interviewer. You can also let them know that you expect to work towards consistent promotions.

      In fact, some of the current workforce general advice being given now is that if you are not promoted within 4 years, you likley won't be and should move on.

      Best regards!

      Decrescendo - thanks for the cooment!

    • seamus profile image

      seamus 8 years ago

      What do you recommend when hiring managers ask you how much you want to earn? I find that question annoying, because benefits are part of the whole package. I used to make less than I do now. I knew my salary was low for my field but I had an extremely flexible schedule and 4 weeks of vacation, so I put up with it.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Oh No!

      You're right - not a thing to say.

      I actually hope HR did not sign the form. Even if it were true, the person could have done the interview, for practice at least, and received the signature. Just my opinion. Thanks for sharing that story!

      PAtty

    • esocial profile image

      esocial 8 years ago from California

      Someone interviewed at my job one time. Before the interview even started he said something to the effect of "it doesn't matter if I get the job or not, you just need to sign this so my parole officer knows I'm looking for a job." Haha, probably not the best way to start an interview!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thank you very much solarshingles! This material has certainly helped a lot of my clients and recent graduates as well.

      Best regards.

    • solarshingles profile image

      solarshingles 8 years ago from london

      Thanks, I really enjoy reading your job interview advices

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thanks Kay! Very insightful comments form real life HR work. I appreciate it. :)

    • Kay Kerns profile image

      Kay Kerns 8 years ago

      Very informative hub... I am glad that you touched basis on not asksing about what the company does. When i worked in HR, if someone asked me that, the interview was virtually over! i mean, every candidate should research the company ahead of time. That was a red flag.. a very good indication as to this individual's work ethic!

      Oh, and the not telling the life story! GOOD TIP! you dont know how many people dig themselves out of a job with that one!

      Thanks for the information, I enjoyed it tremendously!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      It is fantastically good that you love yoru job, Andy Xie! I wish you every success in your career. Thanks for reading and posting enlightening comments. :)

    • Andy Xie profile image

      Andy Xie 8 years ago from Toronto, Ontario, Canada

      Good job Patty! I agree very much with the last point - no life story. It sounds funny, but the amount of people that do it is astounding. Not only is a life story often boring for the interviewer, it's also unprofessional.

      Thanks for all these tips, I'll keep them in mind for my next interview (although hopefully, it won't be anytime soon because I like my job!)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thanks, Chelle From Texas! That sounds like it works very well for you and can for others too. I look forward to your Hubs!

    • Chelle From Texas profile image

      Chelle From Texas 8 years ago

      When it comes to weaknesses, I use things that have nothing to do with the job at hand. I often say math is a weakness, which is true. But I'm a writer, and math has nothing to do with my job. People interviewing me for a writing position aren't concerned about whether or not I can do algebra.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      sandifaist! - LOL, that was kind of an absurd question, wasn't it? I often wonder form such questions - do people want to work ot not? Thanks for contributing!

    • sandifaist profile image

      sandifaist 8 years ago

      Another bit of advice. A pretty funny situation at the time..I was in charge of HR for a busy outpatient radiology clinic and had an applicant on the phone. After talking with her for a few moments she said, "You don't do TOO MANY exams, do you?" She didn't get the interview!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Exactly right! -- some people are meant to lead and not waste away under someone else's "rule", so to speak. Thanks for adding that gem, Cleanclover!

    • Cleanclover 8 years ago

      Thanx for the tips! But I prefer being a boss rather than an employee even if I have to earn less. No compromise with my working hours and freedom. Anyways I am a spiritual person and rather focus on self growth than material growth. Though I know both are vital, but I Just am a handicap working under someone. But anyways nice tips. It will surely help the employees I would get in the future!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thank you very much for the comment. These tips may not be what everyone wants to hear, but they have proven to be correct in the world of work for most occupations.

    • Business Director profile image

      Business Director 8 years ago

      Solid down to earth advice for job seekers. Great article!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      I am glad it helped!

    • Kam profile image

      Kam 8 years ago

      This is a wonderful hub, I learned a lot, THANKS.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thank you Ralph; I value your opinion!

    • Ralph Deeds profile image

      Ralph Deeds 8 years ago

      Good advice!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Thanks for the tip on the book!

    • seamus profile image

      seamus 8 years ago

      I don't think one could go wrong following this advice. A really good book about finding a job is called Ask the Headhunter.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Nice comments, Eric-a-lot! So true. Teachability may be one of the most important qualities on the job! Thank you so much for conmmenting.

    • Eric a lot 8 years ago

      It makes a lasting impression to be articulate and well spoken.Even if you don't know the job employers are more willing to invest the needed training time on a person who's teachable!!!! Your advice on "no slang" is right on target..If you can't learn to express yourself well in a variety of conditions then what will they imagine you teachability is at anything. ( show yourself to be learned and willing to learn more!!!!!!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      Yes indeed, not unless you are breaking in a circus act. :) Or maybe ChildStar Idol.

    • guest 8 years ago

      1 think u should also never say is taht you are a 4 year old on stilts.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thank you for these astute observations! Your website might be useful to many of our readers. I hope you will post on HubPages.

    • Sharon Rosen Lopez 9 years ago

      You've put together a great list of 'what not tos', many of which point to the incredible power that language has in representing the person we are.

      There are a couple of other things to consider as well during interviews. First, avoid references that might indicate your political point of view -- "that son of a gun president we have' may not go over too well if the interviewer doesn't share your perspective. Obviously if you've spent the last two years on the campaign trail for a candidate, that might be on your resume to indicate both what you've been involved with and skills that you have -- but that's different than making a negative aside about a public figure. And, be cognizant that 'how not to sound!' is as important as "what not to say.' If you're feeling defensive, arrogant, angry or have any other 'negative emotion,' that'll come across in your tone of voice, even if you've guarded the words you've used. Our best bet during an interview is to maintain equanimity, unless of course, we're being trapped with a trick question to tease out where we really stand or what it is that might provoke us.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks for visiting and commenting, imarketing4s.

    • imarketing4s profile image

      imarketing4s 9 years ago

      Solid advice. Very useful for fresh and undergrads trying out jobs. :)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Scholars and Readers!

      Thank you to everyone that visits here, but please do not post any more SPAM for expensive items people don't need. Thank you ever so much

      Love and Peace,

      Patty

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      In one interview, I said I did not have any weaknesses, but it was a terchnicality that I be interviewed and my superviors thought it was funny and I did not appreciate it.

      I was already working in the position and the company was required to post it and interview other applicants. Fine. That's even good. They interviewed me last and with a smirk, asked me the interview questions I had already taught several classes of adults how to answer - the interviewers had heard the class material before recently. By the way, it was a dysfunctional company and out of compliance with law, I learned in the next year after I was hired permanently, and the rest of the staff was all laid off except for the security guard -- and me.

      Otherwise, I think the tips and advice in this article work pretty well. There are exeptions and you just have to feel them out. If you run up on a strange company ---maybe don't work for them!

      Patty :)

    • The Phantom Blot profile image

      The Phantom Blot 9 years ago

      Good advice, I'll be keeping it in mind.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Hey, thanks for that!

    • Just Toyia profile image

      Just Toyia 9 years ago from Tennessee

      If it's a bad attitude, well than I have one too!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Hi Toyia - I am irritated by "crazy" questions. I don't have patience for them any more, because they impress me as game playing - like from control freaks and such. Is that a bad attitude?

    • Just Toyia profile image

      Just Toyia 9 years ago from Tennessee

      As a recruiter and an interviewer in reall life, I appauld what you have done here! This needs to get out there. Some items may depend on the person doing the interview too, I have some people that we interview together and some of the things they ask people just drive me up the wall....I sometimes "feel" for those being interviewed when they get hit with those crazy questions, there's usually not a right or wrong answer, but put there just to see how the person being interviewed will react.

    • Eileen profile image

      Eileen 9 years ago from Florida,Miami

      lol, I know exactly what you mean!=]

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks Eileen. It tooka few years to acquire them and I hope others do not have to spend that much time.

    • Eileen profile image

      Eileen 9 years ago from Florida,Miami

      wow, that was really informative!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks for the comments crazycat. I've sat interviews in which the HR person started out by telling my about the salary and benefits, along with details about the company culture and goals. Then he asked if I wished a second interview. Perhaps he was using compensation package as a screener.

    • crazycat profile image

      crazycat 9 years ago from Philippines

      Yes, thumbs up to this post. Number 1 is the most tempting to ask in a job interview. Well, it matters but at least we know we have to wait for the interviewer to tell it to us. Incentives comes second. We are eager to know the bonuses and how many days paid leaves are. But of course, it's a no-no.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      I think offering a plan and clever are different.

      It's good to get a sense of the interviewer's style. For some of them, it might be best to say that you don't know, but would be more than willing to look it up.

    • thooghun profile image

      James D. Preston 9 years ago from Rome, Italy

      Well I thought being clever was the way to go. WRONG. :)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Hmmm. I think I'd answer that I would take the average distance from from the to the moon and divide it by the width of a either quarter or a dollar coin, his choice or both. Then I'd ask the interviewer if I could use a computer to show him how to do it.

      Or I would figure how many dollars (coins) it costs for the space shuttle to reach the moon if it were to be launched (including astronaut & crew pay), or how many dollars converted to today's inflation rate that it took Appolo 11, including astronaut & crew training and pay.

      What do you think?

    • thooghun profile image

      James D. Preston 9 years ago from Rome, Italy

      Thanks Patty. I mean it!

      One question if you would.

      How would you handle abstract questions they might throw at you in order to see how you approach things.

      I.E: How many coins in a stack does it take to reach the moon? (to which I said 1 since they didn't specify the size. I think that answer went down the wrong way).

      Thanks!

      Thoog.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Taha Ahat, thanks for visiting. I look forward to reading your hubs.

    • taha ahat profile image

      taha ahat 9 years ago

      Will remember dese for sure .. :)

      Thank you .. Good hub

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thank you very much for your post, observer502. You've brought another dimension to the discussion thread. If people alwsys used best behaviors and were genuine about it, things would be simpler wouldn't they?

    • observer502 9 years ago

      Good job Patty! I am in fact along the line of an interviewer, and needless to say the interviewee has to put HIS BEST FOOT FORWARD and give me a good and lasting impression. If I have to spend working days with the person, I would want to be pleased and happy I took him in because of his good performance and would not want to regret the day I signed him up for the job. I don't want to feel st_pid. More power!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks for the comments!

      Yes IA - what if, for example, your former employer was committing fraud and you had to testify agasint them? What do you say to future potential employers then? They may think you will put them "under a microscope" to look for things to report!

    • Internet Addict 9 years ago

      I hate the questions that ask about your former jobs because you arent supposed to say anything bad, but sometimes there's nothing good to say.

    • Brandy Owens profile image

      Brandy Owens 9 years ago from Wherever life takes me

      Those are some very important tips. I think everyone can learn something from this article. Good job.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks cheyenne. I hope lots of people read this, because it's hard to learn by trial and error. I found that some interviewers will ask job candidates negative things about ex-employers to trap them! Not good, so we must stay alert. :)

    • cheyenne 9 years ago

      that is awsome of you

      to put that up there for us

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks very much for your comments, H. Irving. I think you are correct in saying we must remain vigilant. I think interviewing can sometimes be too much of a game.

    • H. Irving 9 years ago

      Great hub. I sit in on many second interviews and we have a manager who routinely speaks in such a way to encourage people to let their guard down and make these mistakes. Once you are comfortable and not so nervous you are more likely to do these things, so this hub is a great way to remind people to stay vigilant when interviewing.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Hi Marisa, that's a good "weakness" to point out.

      In one interview I stated that I am not much for socializing when work needs to be done, and the interviewer verbally attacked me about it. First he said i'm inaccessible and then he said it was a strength a not a weakness. The he switched subjects and started discussing pay scales. lol

    • Marisa Wright profile image

      Marisa Wright 9 years ago from Sydney

      Excellent hub, all the questions not to ask are spot on. You even mention the "positive weakness" idea, which a lot of people miss. Personally, I usually say that I'm too much of a perfectionist (in the kind of work I do, that's actually seen as desirable, so again it's a "positive weakness").

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Prob'ly not something to say in an interview :)

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks for the encouragement! I think these tips could help a lot of people that may not be aware of them. :)

    • bihargyan profile image

      bihargyan 9 years ago from India

      Great tips kee it up.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Hi OneShot! Did you find a good job after that horrible expereience? That particular interviewer and his company came to no good, didn't they?

    • OneShot profile image

      OneShot 9 years ago

      Most companies these days spell out the salary range and benefits right in the job description when they are looking for applicants so you shouldn't need more detail about that right away.

      I once(that I know of) wasn't hired only because I answered a direct question with the truth. I was applying for a night or graveyard shift at a factory and they asked my why I didn't want the day shift. I told them my wife was disabled and that it would be better for me to work when she was less active and therefore requireing less care. I learned later from friends already working there (the same friends that got me the interview in the first place) that the company took my answer to mean that I might not be available if they needed me to fill in on day shift. These same friends also informed me that the guy they hired failed his urinalysis. And so never even got started. Their next runner-up lasted almost a week before he fell asleep on the job, allowing a fiberglass roller to spin unsupervised which gummed up the works pretty good and cost the company a lot of time and money.

      That made me feel a little bit better.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Hi chuckbr.

      It depends on the company, imo. I have experienced interviewers outright refuse to tell me about benefits, while others tell EVERY applicant about benefits in order to avoid discrimination complaints.

      Personally, I see a lot of individuals that are badly in need of jobs in order to qualify for healthcare for their families and they really need to know about the benfits.

      Cheers!

    • chuckbr 9 years ago

      well, if you have a lot of interviews with different companies, I don't think it's a bad idea to ask about benefits at the end of the first interview.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks for that insight, mgwhite.

      Sometimes applicants don't know what to say or not to say; other times they have a sense of entitlement. The world really does not owe anyone a living. A few people believe that they will walk into a company and be given a job and high pay without any duties attached.

    • mgwhite profile image

      Mary White 9 years ago from Mobile, AL

      Interviewees definitely need to heed your advice about avoiding any type of "what's in in for me" comments. When you're interviewing for a job, you need to let the employer know how you can help the company, not how the company can help you!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
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      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      Thanks for the postive feedback!

    • Prince Maak profile image

      Prince Maak 9 years ago from Just Above the EARTH and below the SKY

      Very much interesting.

    • Moonmaiden profile image

      Fayme Zelena Harper 9 years ago from Lucerne Valley, CA

      I give it a big thumbs up.

    • Richard 9 years ago

      Very interesting. I wish someone had taught me all of this in high school. Thanks!

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