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Should I Hide Tattoos and Remove Piercings for Job Interviews?

Updated on July 16, 2017
FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway is an Industrial/Organizational Psychologist with applied experience in corporate human resources and consulting.

To Cover or Not to Cover? That Is the Question

Should you cover your tattoos and remove your piercings for job interviews?  The answer used to be a unanimous "yes."  Now it depends.  Here's some help in deciding.
Should you cover your tattoos and remove your piercings for job interviews? The answer used to be a unanimous "yes." Now it depends. Here's some help in deciding. | Source

What's Up Your Sleeve?

You have the required job skills and the passion to succeed. But you also have some unsolicited extras—you confidently rock some pretty killer tattoos. Plus a piercing or two (not in the earlobes).

Overall, 29% of Americans now enjoy tattoos. Among Millenials, that figure is almost one in two.

Piercings are also becoming more mainstream, particularly among younger workers. Thus, there's a good chance that your interviewers have some body art themselves.

It used to be that human resources (HR) professionals unanimously recommended that applicants conceal their tattoos and remove piercings if they hoped to ever get hired. However, with body art now more common than ever, does this advice still ring true?

Going Mainstream: Americans with a Tattoo or Piercing

Generation
% with a Tattoo
% with a Piercing (other than an earlobe)
Millenial (born after 1980)
47
23
Generation X (born 1965-1980)
36
9
Boomers (born 1946-1964)
13
1
Silents (born 1928-1945)
10
-
Greatest Generation (born before 1928)
-
-
Source: Tattoos, 2015 Harris Poll; Piercings, 2010 Pew Research Center
Beautiful tattoo, but have you thought about the inconvenience of hiding it from your employer forever?  Many employers have a "no visible tattoos" policy.
Beautiful tattoo, but have you thought about the inconvenience of hiding it from your employer forever? Many employers have a "no visible tattoos" policy. | Source

Conceal or Reveal? Factors to Consider

It's your choice whether to pursue this job prospect further and allow your tattoos and piercings to remain visible or not.

To help you make a decision that is right for you, take the following factors into consideration:

  • perceptions of people with tattoos and piercings
  • distractability
  • nature of the industry and job you're seeking and
  • company culture and policy.

Reader Poll

When you got your tattoos/piercings, how much consideration did you give to your future employability?

See results
Having a tattoo or piercing may be entirely unrelated to your job qualifications, but the hiring manager may harbor negative stereotypes about people with body modifications.
Having a tattoo or piercing may be entirely unrelated to your job qualifications, but the hiring manager may harbor negative stereotypes about people with body modifications. | Source

Perceptions of People with Tattoos and Piercings

Unfortunately, how others view your self-expression is not always positive, nor is it fair.

Limited research studies have been conducted on the topic, but what's available reveals that people with tattoos are regarded as less intelligent (27%), less attractive (45%), less spiritual (25%), and less healthy (25%). They are also perceived as more rebellious (50%) and more capable of deviant behavior (24%).1 (Those are a lot of assumptions!)

While men with tattoos tend to be seen as more masculine, dominant, and aggressive, women with tattoos face additional perceptual burdens.3 They are more likely to be regarded as less athletic, less motivated, less honest, less generous, and less artistic.2 Whoa! And that's before you open your mouth for the interview!

Such biases may serve to stigmatize an otherwise qualified job seeker. While these largely negative perceptions may not always be fair, studies have found that sporting tattoos and piercings is related to a number of risk-taking behaviors. These include greater use of alcohol and marijuana, a larger number of sexual partners, and less social conformity. Thus, the biases may feel unfair but there may be some kernels of truth in the stereotypes.

Because the stereotypes are almost exclusively negative, consider why you'd want to trigger them in the minds of interviewers. The point of the interview is to impress, isn't it?

During the face-to-face job interview, will the hiring manager be focusing on your skills or your nasal piercings?  What do you want him or her to remember about you?
During the face-to-face job interview, will the hiring manager be focusing on your skills or your nasal piercings? What do you want him or her to remember about you? | Source

Distractability

Like it or not, during the face-to-face job interview you will be judged based on factors other than your job-relevant skills: appearance, mannerisms, posture, etc. Simply looking the part is important.

Therefore, consider:

  • Will your piercings or the location/nature of tattoos distract from your talent?
  • Could they offend? (Political, risque, or death themed tattoos might.)
  • Will you be able to resist clicking your tongue piercing against your teeth while you formulate an answer to a hard interview question?

You want your interviewers to remember you for your dazzling talents, not the "biohazard" symbol on your wrist. (Yes, I know someone with such a tattoo.)

Good luck finding an employer that will allow you to wear a half-naked lady tattoo on the back of your arm.  It could prompt complaints from coworkers regarding sexual harassment.  No joke!
Good luck finding an employer that will allow you to wear a half-naked lady tattoo on the back of your arm. It could prompt complaints from coworkers regarding sexual harassment. No joke! | Source

Nature of the Job and Industry

Another factor to consider is the nature of the job that you're seeking and the industry it's in.

Contrasted with traditional occupations and job roles, employers in creative industries such as those depicted in the table below may be more accepting of tattoos and piercings. Academia, the media, and the entertainment industries, for example, are less conventional, whereas the finance and banking, tobacco, and pulp and paper industries are generally very conservative.

Tattoos/piercings also may be accepted differently based on the type of position you're applying for. Compared with support roles such as IT person or mechanic, expect visible tattoos and piercings to be less permissable in roles that interface directly with the public (e.g., hotel clerk, salesperson, customer service representative, health care provider, daycare worker).

Also be aware that depending on the work performed, some roles may require that piercings be removed for safety and health reasons. For example, some factory workers cannot wear any type of jewelry, whether nose rings or wedding bands. If it's evenly applied, you shouldn't have a problem with it.

Finally, if the role you're applying for involves managing others, cover your tattoos and remove your piercings. The expectations of a manager are more restrictive and conservative.

Creative Industries Are Often More Open to Tattoos/Piercings

Industry
Industry
Industry
advertising & marketing
design (product, graphic, fashion)
publishing
architecture
film, TV, video, radio & photography
museums, galleries & libraries
crafts (e.g., metal work, weaving, woodwork)
IT, software & computer services
music, performing & visual arts
This individual can hide her tattoo, if needed, by simply wearing her hear down.
This individual can hide her tattoo, if needed, by simply wearing her hear down. | Source

Location, Location, Location ... of Your Body Art

The size, number, and location of your tattoos/piercings may substantially affect your choice to conceal or reveal. Facial piercings or those that interfere with speech should be removed. If you don't want to remove your tongue rings, at least replace it with a clear acrylic retainer. Similarly, ear gauges should be replaced with clear acrylic plugs.

Tattoos in prominent locations, particularly those that are more than 2x2 inches should be covered, if at all possible. Some locations are easier to conceal than others, however: the back of neck tattoo or top of arm as opposed to the hands or wrist. For arm tattoos, consider whether you are comfortable always having to wear long sleeves to work (even in the summertime). For women with ankle or leg tattoos, are you comfortable with never wearing a dress to work? This is a personal decision.

When particularly conspicuous tattoos don't allow you much flexibility in concealing them, you may need to broach the subject with your interviewer. Examples include large tattoos on the sides of the neck or hands.

In this case, be proactive and direct by saying, for instance, that you sense some surprise regarding your tattoo/piercing, but that you can assure them you are qualified for the position, have a strong track record of success, and come with positive references. Positively redirect any comments to your qualifications and excitement about this position. Then be ready to nail those interview questions.

I recommend concealing tattoos/piercings while interviewing. Wait until you have a job offer in hand before inquiring about the company's policy and expectations. Stay in the driver's seat and don't give an interviewer any excuse to reject you early.

— FlourishAnyway
If an employer doesn't permit tattoos/piercings, consider whether you're comfortable with always having to hide  who you are.  It's a personal decision.
If an employer doesn't permit tattoos/piercings, consider whether you're comfortable with always having to hide who you are. It's a personal decision. | Source

Customer Service Workers Get Questions from Customers of All Ages

If you're a customer-facing employee with tattoos and piercings that show, be ready for the questions.

When my curious and outgoing daughter was a toddler, I was trying to teach her not to write on herself, our walls, or furniture with pen or magic marker. I never imagined she'd ask questions of strangers.

Then we visited our veterinary office where the female desk clerk sported both a crew cut and a very large neck tatoo that said "REVOLT." As I interacted with the young woman, I could feel my young child's eyes boring a hole into the clerk. My toddler pointed to the gal's neck and blurted out, "Mommy, the lady wrote!"

Then came the questions:

  • "What does that say?"
  • "What does revolt mean?"
  • "Why did you write that?"
  • "Does your mommy know you write on yourself?"

The clerk was very kind. She also pointed out her arm tattoos, to which my daughter responded that she will be in time-out for a very, very long time.

Corporate Policy

Many companies have a written policy regarding whether tattoos and piercings are permitted. It most often falls under the company dress code. As a job applicant, you're on the outside of the company, and you won't know the policy until you either ask directly or are hired.

Employers typically fall under three categories for tattoos:

  • no visible tattoos
  • "appropriate" tattoos ok/no offensive tattoos or
  • tattoos ok.

I recommend concealing tattoos/piercings while interviewing. Wait until you have a job offer in hand before inquiring about the company's policy and expectations. Stay in the driver's seat and don't give an interviewer any excuse to reject you early.

If and when you are offered the job, then you can mention to the hiring manager (who is already sold on the value of your talents) that you have a non-visible tattoo or piercing. If the resulting conversation is a deal-breaker, it could be a teachable moment for either side. (Remember that company policies change because one too many good candidates slipped away.)

Until you have that offer in hand, look to the following sources for information:

  • The company's website may post its diversity policy and information about its corporate culture and values. Does the culture appear to promote individuality and self-expression? Do you see only "clean-cut" employees with a certain look?
  • Ask current employees you know about the company's culture, dress code, and tolerance of employees' individual identity. Do managers and others in visible roles have ink/piercings?

Readers Poll

What is YOUR employer's policy on tattoos and piercings?

See results

Self-Expression vs. Employability

In an ideal world, we wouldn't have to choose between self-expression and employment. Unfortunately, that's oftentimes not reality.

When you chose a piercing or tattoo, chances are you thought through its ramifications. One of the consequences of this self-expression is that not everyone is as excited as your body art as you are. You also probably knew that you'd have to support yourself financially.

Ultimately, the decision to conceal or reveal is up to you. Is this the battle you want to fight? Until attitudes are more accepting, how important is your self-expression vs. food, shelter, and all the other things a good job can buy?

If you feel like hiding your body art means that you're covering up an essential part of you and you feel like you're an imposter, you always have the option of changing employers, industries, or trying entrepreneurship.

Now go ace that job interview!

If body art is a part of your lifestyle like it is for this man, then consider searching harder for a tattoo/piercing-friendly companies, occupation, or position.  Try smaller employers, creative occupations, and non-customer-facing roles.
If body art is a part of your lifestyle like it is for this man, then consider searching harder for a tattoo/piercing-friendly companies, occupation, or position. Try smaller employers, creative occupations, and non-customer-facing roles. | Source

Notes

1 Health & Life - One in Five U.S. Adults Now Has a Tattoo. (2012, February 23). Retrieved from http://www.theharrispoll.com/health-and-life/One_in_Five_U_S__Adults_Now_Has_a_Tattoo.html.

2 Mehta, V. (2013, May 20). How Do People View Women With Tattoos? | Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/head-games/201305/how-do-people-view-women-tattoos.

3 Mehta, V. (2016, December 9). How Do People View Men With Tattoos? | Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/head-games/201612/how-do-people-view-men-tattoos.

What's in a Name? Locations with Names Associated with Tattoos and Piercings

show route and directions
A markerBlowout, Texas, USA -
Blowout, Texas 78624, USA
get directions

A blowout is a tattoo artist error resulting from going too deep or holding the needle at too much of an angle. This produces a hazy or fuzzy shadow.

B markerCanvas, West Virginia, USA -
Canvas, WV 26681, USA
get directions

C markerEmblem, Wyoming, USA -
Emblem, WY 82422, USA
get directions

D markerFlash, United Kingdom -
Flash, Buxton SK17, UK
get directions

A tattoo flash is a stereotypical tattoo design printed on paper or cardboard and displayed on the walls of tattoo parlors as ideas for clients.

E markerHelix, Oregon, USA -
Helix, OR 97835, USA
get directions

A helix is a perforation made on the upper ear cartilage for the purpose of wearing jewelry.

F markerLobe, Uganda -
Lobe, Uganda
get directions

G markerNeedle Lake, California, USA -
Needle Lake, California, USA
get directions

H markerPierce, Nebraska, USA -
Pierce, NE 68767, USA
get directions

I markerPigment Lake, Canada -
Pigment Lake, Cochrane, Unorganized, North Part, ON P0T, Canada
get directions

J markerSymbol, Kentucky, USA -
Symbol, KY 40729, USA
get directions

© 2017 FlourishAnyway

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    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 13 days ago from USA

      Poppy - That's terrific insight for people who may potentially work for Japanese-owned companies, even if they have operations in America. Thank you for the kind comment, too. What a nice compliment!

    • poppyr profile image

      Poppy 13 days ago from Tokyo, Japan

      Easy to read and informative. In Japan, tattoos are pretty taboo and have an even stricter outlook, though that seems to be changing. I admire you so much and continue enjoying your articles!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 3 weeks ago from USA

      Catherine - Your plainspoken honesty made me laugh. I bet your kids are not sporting body modification, and if they do, I bet they got some feedback. I'd be the same way. I told my daughter that if she did this, I'd have to get a matching tattoo or piercing and of course show it off. And no one wants to see that from me. I recall seeing my great grandfather's tattoos when he was an old man (he had been in the Merchant Marines). They probably looked a lot different than they did when he first got them.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image

      Catherine Giordano 3 weeks ago from Orlando Florida

      I find tattoos ugly and body-piercings on the face repulsive. I would never hire someone who looked like that because 1) i wouldn't want to look at them and 2) I hold all the negative perceptions about people who have them that you mentioned. I worked in the corporate world, not in the "creative" occupations.

      The thing about about tattoos is that the are permanent. Over a span of 50 years, styles will change, but the tattoos won't. Anyone want a mullet haricut? Fortunately, hair grows out and it can be cut when styles change.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 3 months ago from USA

      Mary - I love the anecdote about hookers and pierced ears. Times and changed and eventually we'll look back on this issue, too, and probably wonder what the big deal was. My teenaged daughter works at a McDonald's where a regular customer comes in, and he has a large neck tattoo that says, "Trust no one." He works at a local manufacturing plant. Very memorable.

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 3 months ago from Brazil

      Haven't times changed? I remember when I wanted to get my ears pierced, my mother told me only hookers had pierced ears.

      I was surprised with those statistics, but even using my own extended family as a guide, they're correct.

      I worked in HR, and during an interview, if we saw tattoos for example on the forearms, the person was told, they would have to wear long sleeves to hide them. I believe, depending on the industry, a strong and enforced dress code is necessary.

      It is an interesting topic which should be discussed more in schools, employment centers and around the dinner table.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Larry - I can only wonder about the interesting hairdos and facial hair. Perhaps that would be hub-worthy?

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 4 months ago from Oklahoma

      I don't have tattoos or piercings but I often do interesting things with my facial hair and hairdos.

      In a perfect world I think it should not matter unless you're printing messages of hate for everyone to see.

      Yet I'm a bit of a hypocrite. I have a distaste for facial and large neck tattoos.

      As for practically speaking, it's usually best to err on the side of caution if you don't know. But sometimes you have a bit of inside information. For example, I was interviewing for a small, rural school for English teacher. I knew to summon my hick background for that position, and I got the job:-)

      Great read!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Jo - Thanks for reading and commenting.

    • jo miller profile image

      Jo Miller 4 months ago from Tennessee

      I don't have any tattoos but I think you give good advice.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Peggy - If I ever got a tattoo, it would proubably be a cat's pawprint, but of course, I don't work in corporate America anymore. Companies control a lot about their employees already. Thanks for stopping by!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Heidi - It's just a matter of time, but change is often slow, particularly in some sectors. I hope you're doing well! Thanks as always for reading.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 4 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Things are really changing with the years. I was amazed at the current statistics of people who now sport tattoos. Personally I am with the 87% of baby boomers who do not have one. I am happy that I never had to make decisions as to hiding or not hiding them from an employer.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 4 months ago from Chicago Area

      I truly think that it does depend on the industry. I also think that as Millennials begin to be the dominant generation in the workforce, that these tattoo taboos will start to give way to more acceptance. But until then, I agree, the best thing is probably to conceal until more about the company culture and norms are known. Great thoughts, as always! Happy Monday!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      MsDora - Our local McDonald's even requires body art to be concealed due to customers' potential reactions. A classmate of my daughter has a biohazard tattoo on her wrist as well as other art and I'm not sure she considered the longer term implications of the choice. Thanks for stopping by!

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 4 months ago from The Caribbean

      Good advice, Flourish! Millenials especially seem to need constant reminders of the many ways (including appearance) in which they influence people and with what results.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Kallini2010 - What an amazing comment. People's impressions are often formed instantly, under 10 seconds, which is why it's important to consider one's posture, manner of dress, how you walk into a room of people, etc. I like the perspective that there are a variety of alternatives for expressing your individuality (e.g., clothes, makeup, music, etc.). Many people who have tattoos do have a strong identification with music, according to research, but can you imagine enjoying the same music decades from now? And then there's a trend now with "blackout" tattoos (large swaths of solid ink) and armpit tattoos.

      I've told my daughter that if she gets a tattoo, then I'm doing it too so we can be inked twins, only I won't be hiding mine. The horror of having me show it off, wherever it is, may or may not be a deterrent for her.

      I've investigated complaints in the workplace in which people do not actually keep their tattoos to themselves (e.g., "tramp stamps") but rather display them to others at work, including subordinates. Not a good career move.

    • kallini2010 profile image

      kallini2010 4 months ago from Toronto, Canada

      One of my (favourite) browsers was malfunctioning. I had a tattoo on my forehead (a sticker something or some such - don't ask what it said - "something stupid no doubt" - but I have an excuse - I wasn't myself.

      Having a tattoo on a forehead is my best idea - if you are serious, put it on the prominent surface - at least people would be staring at your face and look you in the eye...

      But without further ado - I'll paste the comment - please take into consideration that when I write comments, I mostly do free flowing writing. If I took the time to contemplate, I would not have written anything and that it my true opinion about tattoos - do not reveal yourself ("your self-expression", it might bite you in the butt or hit on the forehead).

      **********************************

      To be honest, I have no tattoos, but I have no job either. I know how to make a good impression and often do. People like me and like telling me who I am. No matter how many times I honestly and in no vague terms explain more about myself and my personality/current conditions/challenges (they don't believe a word of it) - they rely on their perception.

      No matter what others say about themselves - I rely on my feeling after the first handshake and I am surprised (all too often!) how many people have not learned that lesson yet. Just the other day...

      That is probably the answer - you may talk all you like about why you have a tattoo (even the most tasteful) - the employer's perception will stay where it was the first moment they saw it.

      Having body "art" gives you less flexibility and decreases chances of getting a job among other things. It is my perception, that people with higher intelligence will opt for flexibility and adaptability vs. permanent "in your face" art.

      Body art is not self-expression; it is more like "others-impression". If you are a Viking (sailor) for life, it makes sense to have tattoos all over (including facial ones). If a Viking turns into farmer, he looks weird and out of place.

      I think of tattoos as an undesirable feature for an actor - you can't play anyone with that "stamp" (no matter where it is - too many times actors are required to strip entirely).

      I always told my son - don't get any tattoos - don't do anything permanent to your body because later you might (and probably will) regret it. You want to "self-express" - use clothes/costumes/make up.

      And just the other day, on a bus, a man was talking to me for half an hour and said "The world into which your daughter will grow in will be so different".

      Of course, it will. But "the law of perception" will never change. Just because my son has long hair doesn't mean he is my daughter. But he did not even get a second glance - his "true identity" was hidden in plain sight.

      And he is as non-conformist as it gets. I don't take credit for his intelligence, but given his rebellious nature, what surprises me that for all that fourteen years our apartment sustained practically no damage. No writing on the walls, no broken things...

      My answer would be - it depends whether to hide or not to hide tattoos, but if you rebel once, you'll rebel again and giving others "the intel" on your future behavoiur is not the smartest thing to do. But to defend those who decide to proudly present their "in your face" body art - others who are perceptive (intelligent) enough will get "a good reading" anyway. You cannot cover your personality. Starting with that handshake...

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Linda - I don't have any tattoos myself, but I imagine that there might come a point where employers will need to become more accepting. Thank you for your insights and observations about British Columbia!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Kallini2010 - I love your tattoo idea. Maybe just a temporary tattoo on the forehead? You never know when those brakes will decide to kick back in. For whatever reason, I never got your other comment, so if you want to repost it, please do. I'm always entertained by and interested in your opinion.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 4 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This article contains good advice that makes sense to me. I'm seeing an increasing number of people with tattoos in my area. The presence of visible tattoos is becoming more common even in jobs that involve interaction with the public. Piercings seem to becoming more popular, too, though I don't see them as often as tattoos. Interest in body art is certainly growing.

    • kallini2010 profile image

      kallini2010 4 months ago from Toronto, Canada

      Hello, Flourish:

      I've written a comment yesterday - but I think my browser was out to lunch to get a tattoo in the most inappropriate place.

      Let me know if you got it, if not, let me know if you want me to post it (it's kinda long) - I should get a tattoo on my forehead

      BRAKES DISABLED

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Martie - Thanks for sharing your viewpoints. Anyone with body art is bound to run into people with this perspective, so they're probably ready for it. I have also heard of women who cover mastectomy scars with tattoos. This is a real way to take back their power from cancer. I do wonder, however, about the impact on the immune system, but it's their choice, their bodies.

    • MartieCoetser profile image

      Martie Coetser 4 months ago from South Africa

      Very interesting and comprehensive hub about tattoos and employers view on them.

      I am a Boomer, but when it comes to tattoos and body piercing other than earlobes, I am a member of the Greatest Generation. I can handle one or two small tattoos on someone's body, but a body covered with tattoos repels me, even while I know the spirit inside the body could be beautiful.

      I must add, however, that I've seen women who have had a mastectomy covering their wound(s) with tattoos. Now that looks awesome!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Linda - Love that comment. I think it does have a lot to do with the type of work as well as industry and role. Ink on the face is hard for me to ignore but I guess to each his or her own. The gal with the REVOLT tatoo was actually very sweet, although she really made a screaming statement with the size and placement of her tatoo.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Ryan - Thanks for weighing in. It's great to have your perspective. In the war for talent even the CIA realized they couldn't blanketly exclude tattoos if they wanted the best talent.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Peg, thanks for stopping by. Times have absolutely changed! Attitudes will eventually catch up, I imagine.

    • Carb Diva profile image

      Linda Lum 4 months ago from Washington State, USA

      What a great article. I have grown accustomed to visible tatoos, especially in the younger generation, but ink on the face still bothers me as does major hardware (a piercing in the septum, for example). Yes, I admit that I'm an old fart. I think a great deal has to do with the type of work one is doing.

    • Fullerman5000 profile image

      Ryan Fuller 4 months ago from Louisiana, USA

      I have a total of three tattoos as of now, I do not have any piercings. I think it all depends on what type of job you are going for. I feel that many companies and corporations are becoming more lenient on tats and piercings, but I know some that still have strict rules. I always told myself if I do get any tats, I wanted to be able to cover them up.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 4 months ago from Dallas, Texas

      Thanks for an enlightening view of today's trends in body art and the perception of tattoos in the workplace. It was interesting to see the statistics on the way things are changing among the younger generations.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Bill - Thanks for sharing your take. Everyone would want a boss like you.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      Debangee - Some people certainly are offended by them, incuding customers. Others see them as a beautiful means of self-expression. I guess it's a matter of personal preference. Thanks for sharing your opinion! I always appreciate both the read and an honest opinion.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      It's a fascinating topic. After growing up in the 60's, I think I'm a bit more accepting of "statements" like piercings an tattoos. I'm also a businessman, and if I have employees, I have to balance what is good for my business with what is good for my employees. The fact that tattoos don't bother me in no way means I can ignore their effect on customers. I would probably opt for covering the major ones, but my heart wouldn't be in it. :)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 4 months ago from USA

      purl3agony - Thank you! The community I live in is an interesting mix, and both employees and employers are struggling with the issue. It's a conservative city with several Fortune 500 companies, but at the same time we have a mid-sized university in the city and enjoy a big population of artists and other creatives.

    • purl3agony profile image

      Donna Herron 4 months ago from USA

      Interesting topic and hub! I think you cover many great points here. Generally, I agree that covering your tattoos and removing your piercings depends on the job and industry that you are interviewing for and the nature of your tattoo or placement of the piercing. I'm glad you shared this information. I think a lot of people might not consider whether they need to cover or remove their body art.

    • Debangee Mandal profile image

      DEBANGEE MANDAL 4 months ago from India

      The article is highly informative and useful. Tatoos really do create a bad image in work place . Thank you for sharing such an useful , interesting hub. Have a good day!