A Stock Market Timing Method That Works

Updated on April 17, 2018
Rock_nj profile image

I have been involved in trading and in investing in stocks for four decades. I enjoy learning and writing about financial topics.

The holy grail that all stock market traders and active investors seek is a stock market timing method that actually works. Many financial advisors and commentators dismiss the notion that one can actually time the market to get out when a decline is occurring and get back in to ride the market up once a bull market returns. This may be true in the short-term, since nobody knows what news or developments will send the stock market higher or lower on a day to day or even week to week basis. However, looking out to a longer-term time horizon, there is a clearly a market timing method that has proven its worth over time, since it provides accurate signals regarding when to be in the stock market and when to step to the sideline and hold cash.

This stock market timing method uses what is called a “Twelve-Month Simple Moving Average (SMA) Chart.” A Simple Moving Average is calculated by adding the closing price of a stock or a stock market index, such as the Standard and Poors 500 (S&P 500) Index, for a number of time periods, then dividing the sum by the number of time periods utilized. For example, a Twelve-Month Simple Moving Average Chart of the S&P 500 Index (as depicted below) is constructed by adding up the monthly closing price for the index for twelve prior months, then dividing the total by twelve. This yields an average price for the index over the prior twelve months, which is plotted on a chart at the end of the twelve month time period. This process is repeated for each month to construct this chart.

A Video Explanation of What a Simple Moving Average (SMA) Is

How To Use a Twelve-Month Simple Moving Average Chart To Time The Stock Market

The below chart is a depiction of the Twelve-Month Simple Moving Average for the S&P 500 Index compared to the actual trading level of the S&P 500 Index (the blue line) from 1995 until early 2018. The green dots are monthly points in time when the 12-month Simple Moving Average was above the level that the S&P 500 Index was at during the same month. Conversely, the red dots represent months that this moving average was below where the S&P 500 Index was trading.

So what does this tell us? Per the stock market timing methodology under examination, each green dot indicates a time that stocks should be held, while each red dot indicates a period when stocks should be sold and investors should hold onto cash or at least lighten up on their stock holdings.

12-Month Simple Moving Average Chart of S&P 500 Stock Index

A Chart of the 12-Month Simple Moving Average of the S&P 500 Stock Index That Shows Buy and Sell Indicators
A Chart of the 12-Month Simple Moving Average of the S&P 500 Stock Index That Shows Buy and Sell Indicators | Source

Understanding The Twelve-Month Simple Moving Average of the S&P 500 Index Chart

A Twelve-Month Simple Moving Average of the S&P 500 Index Chart is all you need to obtain useful market timing buy and sell signals. As you can see from the chart above, following this market timing method would have allowed one to avoid the two steep stock market sell-offs that occured from the end of 2000 to the beginning of 2003 and again from the later part of 2007 to the early part of 2009. These two sell-offs are respectively known as the “Dot-Com Bubble Burst” and the “Great Recession” sell-offs. Being either entirely or largely out of stocks during these two steep bear markets would have resulted in a great amount of preservation of capital to deploy when the marketing timing indicator turned green and indicated it was time to be holding stocks. As you can see, there are some false indications of sell-offs, which are brief periods in which red dots appear. However, a disciplined trader or investor will simply get back into stocks once the Twelve-Month Simple Moving Average of the S&P 500 Index turns green again.

Essentially, following this market timing method not only allows one to step to the sidelines and hold cash during steep sell-offs, it also helps one hold onto stocks with confidence and ride the stock market higher during periods when it is rallying and is in a bull market phase. It is a backward looking indicator, so it will not allow you to get out and into stocks at the exact top or bottom of a trend reversal; however, as indicated by the chart above, that does not really matter since many sell-offs and rallies go on for many months and often many years. This indicator gives one plenty of time to react and benefit over long periods of time.

A Breakdown of the S&P 500 Index By Economic Sector

The S&P 500 Index is a broad stock market index that tracks approximately 500 stocks of major United States companies in a variety of economic sectors.
The S&P 500 Index is a broad stock market index that tracks approximately 500 stocks of major United States companies in a variety of economic sectors. | Source

Stock Market Timing Poll

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A Simple Long-Term Timing Signal For The Markets - 12 Month S&P 500 SMA

Stock Market Timing By SMA Charting The S&P 500 Index

The S&P 500 Index is one of the best indexes to use for SMA charting market timing, due to its broad representation of the U.S. economy.
The S&P 500 Index is one of the best indexes to use for SMA charting market timing, due to its broad representation of the U.S. economy. | Source

Questions & Answers

    © 2018 John Coviello

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      • Rock_nj profile imageAUTHOR

        John Coviello 

        4 months ago from New Jersey

        That is certainly a good strategy Mary, especially if you're investing for the long haul, as the stock market eventually recovers from dips. Thanks for reading.

      • aesta1 profile image

        Mary Norton 

        4 months ago from Ontario, Canada

        Good that you found a timing method that works.Timing the market is the hardest challenge for any investor. Fear and greed play their part there. The best strategy that worked well for us is to spend time choosing the best-performing companies with solid earnings and market potential. When they go down in the dip, they are sure to recover.

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