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Banks Versus Credit Unions: Which Is Better?

People ask: what is the best bank in a given location? What is the best bank for a specific customer?

Re-phrasing the question to "What is the best financial institution?" is the way to find what's best.

It is positively amazing how many people put up with all the fees many banks and other financial institutions attach to their savings, checking, and credit card accounts. Those banks and financial institutions will keep on doing it as long as the consumer keeps letting them get away with it. There is no excuse for a consumer to tolerate these kinds of bank fees when there are so many alternatives available.

Bank fees add up over a lifetime.
Bank fees add up over a lifetime. | Source

Avoid National Banks and National Credit Card Companies

Local banks and credit unions are the way to go.

The average consumer should never do business with a national bank or national credit card company. Check out your locally owned banks; even better, check out your local credit unions.

National debit card companies might be OK: read the fine print.

Customers who have followed the above principles:

A. Have not paid any monthly account fees in decades.

B. Have not paid any check fees in decades.

C. Have not paid any credit or debit card transaction fees in decades.

Also, they:

A. Have always been paid higher interest on their savings.

B. Have always paid lower interest on their loans.

C. Have always experienced the bliss of fewer and lesser fees all-around.

And What Is a Credit Union?

A credit union, in the United States, is a co-op arrangement among members. Those members with money make deposits. Those members who need money take out loans.

The spread between the interest paid to members with savings and the interest collected from members with loans is supposed to be no larger than what will cover the co-op’s expenses.

The covered expenses also enable both savers and borrowers to have free checking accounts, free debit cards, free credit cards, and many other free or lesser-fee services. Many countries have these same co-op type institutions; they are just called by different names.

About Credit Union Membership

With banks, you are a customer. With credit unions, you are a member.

It used to be difficult to become a member of a credit union. The usual requirement being you were working for a specific employer. In fact, many times the credit union was actually named after the employer. Many of those credit unions are still alive and well today.

Membership requirements these days are much more open. Every credit union has unique criteria.

Credit unions did not come up with the idea of membership requirements. Federal regulations require members of credit unions to have something in common; this usually was the mutual employer scenario.

However, other criteria can now be used; just being a member of a certain profession is a good example.

What opened the floodgates is the now current use of geographical location as to what determines eligibility. In other words, do you and the credit union live in the same county? If so, congratulations; you are a member. The credit union website will clearly spell out the eligibility requirements to become a member.

If you do not qualify, it is neither their fault nor yours; federal regulations are federal regulations. The good news is your chances of success are fairly high. Worst case scenario is you merely proceed to your local bank instead.

Savings and Loans (S&L’s) can also be a good choice (if there are any left in your area). Internet-based financial institutions are also worth checking out, but be very careful and check the fee schedules with a fine-toothed comb.

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About Your Local Banks and Credit Unions: The Good

Here is the normal fee structure at your good locally owned banks and credit unions:

A. There are no membership fees. There are no annual or monthly credit card fees. There are no annual or monthly debit card fees.

B. Savings accounts have no monthly or other fees. A minimum balance requirement of a couple hundred bucks is acceptable.

C. Checking accounts have no monthly fees and no minimum balance requirements. The requirement you have a savings or similar account with a reasonable minimum balance to qualify for the free checking account is an acceptable option. Using the direct deposit option to qualify for a free checking account is not always a good idea; getting slammed with a bunch of fees when you lose your job is not the way to go.

D. No debit card point-of-sale fees of any kind.

E. No credit card point-of-sale fees of any kind.

F. Very minimal or no ATM fees on debit card transactions.

G. All other fees are less than what you are paying at your current financial institution.

About Your Local Banks: The Bad

It should be noted some local banks can be even more obnoxious than your national banks. Local banks are just like any other locally owned business. Employee attitude will directly reflect the personality and attitude of the owner(s) of the bank.

Fortunately, the bank’s fee structure is very often a clear indication of the bank’s attitude towards the general public. Ridiculous and excessive fees? Go elsewhere.

About Your Local Credit Unions: The Bad

Credit unions are well-known for being the better deal. As such, there are bankers-to-be who come out of the woodwork to take advantage of the better reputation credit unions have.

The methodology to do this is not difficult. The banker-to-be simply opens his business via/under the credit union regulations and rules. Then, as far as interest rates and fee structuring goes, they run it like a bank.

There is a credit union in San Francisco that is positively famous for this.

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How to Find Your Local Banks and Credit Unions

Finding them is not hard to do. The usual Yellow Pages perusal and/or an internet search will turn them right up.

As to finding the good ones, you will need to check their website. Find their fee schedule and you will know what you need to know. If they do not have a fee schedule online, then that is a possible red flag.

If your choices are limited, then you may have to make a personal visit to the financial institution and check out their brochures in the lobby.

Those financial institutions having the "glass cage" set-up you must navigate to enter and exit the premises should be avoided like the plague. For some reason, there seems to be a strong correlation between "glass cage" usage and the treatment of customers as peasants in general.

You can also find a local credit union, plus all sorts of other worthy credit union information, at the federally run Nation Credit Union Administration (NCUA) website.

You can find all sorts of interesting information about your local banks at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) website. They even maintain a public list of failed banks.

Next is the opening of an account. A driver’s license, Social Security card, and a pleasant attitude are all that should be required. If the bank or credit union employee, or the procedures in general, are unusually obstructive; then forget it and move on. If they require you have an account with them for at least six months before allowing you to apply for a debit card, then you definitely want nothing to do with them.

Worthy Internet Institutions

There are worthy internet-based institutions out there. Just thoroughly check their fee schedule; particularly as relates to their checking accounts, credit cards and debit cards. Also, plug their name and the word "scam" into your search engine and see what pops up.

Only consider doing business with credit unions authorized to display this logo:

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Only consider doing business with local banks and internet-based financial institutions authorized to display this logo (or other equivalent government signage)

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Comments - If you have an opinion regarding a particular financial entity, feel free to post it here. 3 comments

Sinea Pies profile image

Sinea Pies 5 years ago from Northeastern United States

Very interesting hub. I bank with a credit union and would never change. They actually are out to protect their depositors since we are actually members.

Hey, how'd you get the beautiful dividers between capsules? Looks great!


Kathleen Cochran profile image

Kathleen Cochran 5 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Good info. I used to be a community bank marketing officer and I learned the least profitable customers to most banks are the ones who frequently come into the bank building to do their banking. We tried to turn them into cheerleaders for the bank by calling them by name, giving them something like a baseball cap or car tag whenever they came in hoping to get some advertising benefit from them. I get angry when my credit union behaves exactly like a bank (won't reduce fees, etc.) because I know they get tax breaks that banks don't get and are suppose to pass those savings on to their customers - but I still use a credit union because in all there are just too many benefits.


Hollie Thomas profile image

Hollie Thomas 5 years ago from United Kingdom

Hi Paradismsearch,

This is really comprehensive. For those that will be engaging in the, move your money on November 5th 2011, this kind of information will ensure that the public know what to look for and what to expect. Priceless information.

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