How to Respond to a Debt Collection Letter and What to Include in a Debt Validation Letter

Updated on July 5, 2018
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Katie Wheat is a consumer who was sued by debt buyers and has been researching debt collection laws for over 10 years.

Due to unforeseen circumstances, many consumers default on their debts. As a result, they will be contacted by debt collectors.

Thankfully, there are consumer protection laws that aid those consumers. One of those laws is the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). Anyone who has received a debt collection letter should read the Act.

I am not an attorney, but I am a consumer. Due to my past experiences, I have been researching the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and other consumer protection statutes for 10 years. The following article is based upon my experiences and research.

If you have any questions, please ask, and I will respond.

What's Required in a Debt Collection Letter, and How Long You Have to Reply to It

You defaulted on a debt and have received a debt collection letter from a collection agency.

This letter is important. Do not ignore it.

The first collection letter you receive from a collection agency should include a validation notice. United States Code of Law, 15 U.S.C. § 1692g governs validation notices and requirements.

§11692g(a) states that within 5 days of an intial communication, a debt collector must provide a consumer a written notice containing (1) the amount of the debt, (2) the name of the creditor to whom the debt is owed, (3) that the debt collector can assume a debt to be valid if the consumer does not dispute the debt within 30 days after receiving the notice, (4) a statement that the debt collector must verify the debt if the consumer requests validation within 30 days of receiving the 30-day notice and (5) a statement that a consumer can request the name and address of the original creditor, if it's different from the current creditor.

In the event you receive a collection letter from a debt buyer who has purchased your debt, that debt buyer is considered the "current creditor". That is due to the fact that the creditor with whom you opened the account charged off and sold your account to the debt buyer.

The very first line references an "initial communication". That means the first communication. If the first communication is a letter, pay attention to what should be included in the letter. It should include the information referenced in (1) - (5) of the above-referenced section of the FDCPA.

And pay close attention to (3). If you choose to request validation of the debt, you MUST do so within 30 days of receiving the letter that contains that notice. That does not mean 30 days from the date the letter was written. That time limit is based upon the date you RECEIVE the letter in the mail.

Misconceptions About Debt Validation

Unfortunately, some sites that recommend consumers send a detailed letter requesting documentation and information that a debt collector is not required to provide in order to validate a debt. While a consumer can request anything he chooses, a debt collector does not have to provide anything more than what the law requires.

Things You Don't Need to Include in a Request for Validation

Here is a list of items that some sites suggest consumers include in a debt validation request.

  • What the money you say I owe is for;
  • Explain and show me how you calculated what you say I owe;
  • Provide me with copies of any papers that show I agreed to pay what you say I owe;
  • Prove the Statute of Limitations has not expired on this account;
  • Show me that you are licensed to collect in my state;
  • Provide me with your license numbers and Registered Agent;

Those items are not required to validate a debt. Debt collectors do not have to provide a detailed accounting, proof that the statute of limitations has expired, or proof of license to collect a debt in your state.

Some Federal Courts of Appeals have ruled on the issue of debt validation/verification.

"Contrary to Appellants' contention, verification of a debt involves nothing more than the debt collector confirming in writing that the amount being demanded is what the creditor is claiming is owed; the debt collector is not required to keep detailed files of the alleged debt. There is no concomitant obligation to forward copies of bills or other detailed evidence of the debt." Chaudhry v. Gallerizzo, 174 F.3d 394, 406 (4th Circuit Court of Appeals, 1999).

"We agree with the district court that '[v]erification only requires a debt collector to confirm with his client that a particular amount is actually being claimed, not to vouch for the validity of the underlying debt.'" Chaudhry at 406.

"We adopt as a baseline the more reasonable standard articulated by the Fourth Circuit in Chaudhry. At the minimum, 'verification of a debt involves nothing more than the debt collector confirming in writing that the amount being demanded is what the creditor is claiming is owed.'" Clark v. Capital Credit & Collection Services Inc., 460 F.3d 1162 (9th Cir.2006).

"This provision is not intended to give a debtor a detailed accounting of debt to be collected." Maynard v. Cannon, 401 F. App’x 389, 396 (10th Cir. 2010).

Some suggested letters state that you should include references to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and Fair Credit Reporting Act in your validation request.

That is not necessary. It's the debt collector's job to know the law. If he doesn't know the law, that's his problem. Nothing in the FDCPA suggests that a consumer must do anything other than dispute the debt and request validation within the required 30 days.

There are those that will tell you that sending a detailed letter containing various requests informs a debt collector that you know your rights.

That is incorrect. Requesting information that is not required informs a debt collector that you DO NOT know your rights.

If you know your rights, would you request information that is not required by law? No. Anyone who advises you that a debt collector must provide certain information when that information is not required by law proves that the person has not researched the law.

Is the Debt Collector Required to Respond?

Some misinformed individuals will tell you that the debt collector must respond to you within 30 days of receiving your letter. THAT IS FALSE!

Review (1) - (5) of 1692g. The statute states that a debt collector must cease collection efforts until the debt is verified. However, it does not state that the debt collector must respond to your request within 30 days. The only 30-day requirement is on the consumer to dispute the debt and request validation. Neither 1692g(a) or (b) states that a debt collector must respond to you within 30 days of your request for validation. The debt collector can take as long as it chooses to send validation of the debt, but it cannot continue collection efforts until the debt is validated.

A Summons and Complaint From the Court is Not an "Initial Communication"

Some ill-advised persons will tell you to send a validation request after receiving a summons and complaint for a lawsuit.

The FDCPA specifies that a request for validation must be sent within 30 days of an initial communication. A summons and complaint is NOT an initial communication that triggers your right to request validation of a debt. Note 1692g(d) of the FDCPA:

1692g(d):

(d) Legal pleadings

"A communication in the form of a formal pleading in a civil action shall not be treated as an initial communication for purposes of subsection (a)."

Congress amended the FDCPA in 2006 to clarify that "[a] communication in the form of a formal pleading in a civil action shall not be treated as an initial communication for purposes of subsection (a) of this section." 15 U.S.C. § 1692g(d). Carlin v. Davidson Fink LLP, 852 F.3d 207, 213 (2d Cir. 2017).

You can send a validation request after receiving a summons and complaint from a collection agency, but the plaintiff is not required to respond.

A Sample Request for Validation

The best validation letter is one that is simple and to the point.

Here is a sample letter letter to send to a debt collector within 30 days of receiving the initial communication.

Date

Your Name
Your Address

Debt Collector's Name
Address

RE: Account Number ________________

To Whom It May Concern:

I dispute the above-referenced debt and request validation.

Your Name

That's it. Nothing else. That's all you have to do. You've disputed the debt and requested validation. That letter is all that is required on your part by the FDCPA.

Once a debt collection agency receives a timely validation request, it cannot continue its collection efforts until it responds to your request.

I would recommend that you send your letter via certified mail, return receipt requested. This will allow you to have proof that you sent your letter within 30 days of receiving the intial communication. The return receipt proves that the debt collector received your letter.

Comments

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    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Katie Wheat 

      2 days ago from South Carolina

      Which part?

    • profile image

      MillyAnn 

      2 days ago

      This is horrible advice.

    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Katie Wheat 

      8 days ago from South Carolina

      Hi ReneeSB,

      It's true that a summons and complaint is not an initial communication.

      You can send a request for validation to the attorney, but he doesn't have to respond to it. However, since you're being sued, you need to answer the complaint and then request discovery. Read your court rules to see if discovery is allowed, if you need permission from the court, etc.

      By the way, some people may tell you that you're not really being sued by Discover. They may say that the account is owned by a junk debt buyer who s trying to trick you by naming Discover as the plaintiff.

      Check your credit report. If the account has been sold to a debt buyer, Discover's entry will show "sold" or "transferred". If one of those words does not appear, then Discover still owns the account, and you should consult an attorney.

      In the event that Discover still owns the account, be careful of those who will say that a debt buyer is trying to trick you. Since Discover is named as the plaintiff, the court will accept that as the truth. If you spend your time trying to prove that a debt buyer owns the account, you will lose and have a judgment against you.

      Go to the top of this page and click on my profile. You'll see the other articles I've written. Perhaps one or both of them will help you.

    • profile image

      ReneeSB 

      10 days ago

      I got a summons and complaint from Discover Bank. Your article says that a summons and complaint is not an initial communication. Does that mean I can't send a request for validation?

    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Katie Wheat 

      2 weeks ago from South Carolina

      Jackie2019,

      If the information was sent directly to you, no privacy laws were violated. In addition, from what I understand, there is no private right of action under HIPAA.

      I would contact the medical provider. It’s possible that the collection agency was collecting for the provider and did not purchase a debt.

      An excellent source for more information on HIPAA is https://www.creditinfocenter.com/community/.

    • profile image

      Jackie2019 

      2 weeks ago

      Katie, I greatly appreciate your research on this issue. I had a 249$ collection and disputed. I am a member of Credit secrets on facebook and one of the nice ladies pointed me to your article thankfully. I received from these collectors that bought the debt I assume ; a letter that was about 10 pages long. It had my drivers license on it, my signature and all the medical information the clinic had on me. Is this a violation of Hippa? Thank you for your time.

    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Katie Wheat 

      2 weeks ago from South Carolina

      Charandkids,

      Have you answered the complaint yet?

      Once you've been sued, it's too late to request validation. As you can read in my article, a validation request must be sent within 30 days of the initial communication. The FDCPA states that a summons and complaint is not an initial communication.

      Also, despite what others may say, debt collectors do not have to provide much documentation to validate a debt. For instance, they don't have to provide a copy of a contract or a complete accounting of a debt. In my article, I've included rulings from Courts of Appeals that show very little is required for validation.

      You can get more information and documentation from discovery. Whether or not you can request discovery depends upon your court. If you are in magistrate court, read your rules.

      Some magistrate courts require permission from the court to request discovery.

      Again, read your court's rules.

    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Katie Wheat 

      2 weeks ago from South Carolina

      Charandkids,

      Who is named as the plaintiff?

    • profile image

      charandkids 

      2 weeks ago

      I recieved a court summons to respond as I'm being sued by collection agency. Do I have any standing grounds to request from collection agency how they claim I owe them vs. Credit card? Should I respond to summons with request for court hearing, disputing claim of debt owed or claim not disputed/pymt of claim? Thank you for your input on this. I understand your not a lawyer. Char

    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Katie Wheat 

      8 weeks ago from South Carolina

      You're welcome.

    • profile image

      David W Strausser 

      8 weeks ago

      Thanks

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