15 Tips For Renting A House


Whenever you rent any property, you need to be vigilant because you don't own the property. While being vigilant can mean ensuring that no damage happens to the property, it also means that you need to be vigilant about your legal rights as a tenant. Here are some tips for renting a house.

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1. Understand the Landlord-Tenant laws in your area. It's important to research the Landlord-Tenant laws to ensure that you, as the tenant, understand your rights and responsibilities.

2. Inspect the property. You should inspect the water system, air conditioning unit, locks for doors and windows, plumbing (make sure the toilets flush), and etc. Make sure to ask the realtor or landlord about house maintenance and when the house was last maintained. You don't want to rent a home with plumbing issues or heating problems during the winter.

3. Read your lease carefully. Your lease is a legal contract between you and the landlord for use of the landlord's property. A lease may contain extra clauses that aren't legally required by Landlord-Tenant laws, but the clauses are legally binding when the lease is signed by both parties. If you are concerned that your lease might be unfair to you (e.g. the landlord requiring you to have property inspections every week), you can seek legal counsel and retain an attorney specializing in Landlord-Tenant relations.

4. Inspect the property again. Once the lease is finalized and agreed upon by both the landlord and tenant, you can request to see the property again. When you're at the property, take photos and document any form of damage you see. If you see small holes in the walls caused by a wall-mounted television screen, take a photo and inform the landlord in writing. Your landlord may or may not fix the damage before you move in. However it's important to inform the landlord prior to moving into home, otherwise the landlord may accuse you of the damage and take money from your deposit to repair it.


5. Pay your rent on time. Once you move into your new home, you need to pay your rent on time. Rent can be paid with cash, checks, or electronic transfers. Paying in cash is not recommended because there's no paper trail to track your money. If you decide to pay in cash, make sure you ask for a receipt that documents the date and what the cash is for.

6. Make sure your landlord has been paid. When mailing a check to your landlord, make sure your landlord deposits the check. If your landlord hasn't deposited or cashed your check, inform your landlord that you've mailed the rent check. It's better to inform your landlord in writing, such as email or text message. You don't want your landlord to accuse you of failing to pay rent on time.

7. Establish a good relationship with you and your landlord. This doesn't mean that you need to be best friends with your landlord. However, you don't want your landlord to outright hate you. A disgruntled landlord can be difficult to deal with during the duration of your lease. Be kind and respectful to your landlord. If you want to go the extra mile, you can send greetings cards during the holidays. A happy landlord may respond quicker to any emergency repairs. If you only communicate with your landlord's property manager, then establish a good relationship with that property manager.

8. Document all communication between you and the landlord. Emails and text messages are good ways to document any correspondence. Even if you have a good relationship with your landlord, you should always take the necessary steps to protect yourself in case things get ugly. (And things can get ugly quickly.) Verbal promises are hard to prove in Court.

9. Get to know your neighbors. This may not seem like an important tip, but your neighbors can be valuable sources of information. Your neighbor probably knows the area well, and could recommend to you a good dentist, auto body shop, or local restaurant. Also, your neighbor may know your landlord and the previous tenants of the house. It could be important to learn about your landlord's history with tenants, especially if the landlord consistently fails to repair the property.

10. Contact your landlord if the property needs repairs. As a tenant, it is your responsibility to inform your landlord if something needs fixing in the home. If you fail to contact the landlord and the damage gets worse over time, you could be liable for some of the damage because you failed to notify the landlord.

11. Don't sneak pets onto the property without approval from your landlord. If you plan to adopt a dog or cat, you need to ask permission from your landlord. Many landlords do not allow animals to live on their property. Animals can case a lot of damage to a home. To be on the safe side, ask permission from your landlord if you plan to get a goldfish.

12. Allow your landlord to perform inspections, but don't allow your landlord to harass you. Landlords are allowed to inspect their properties as long as the tenants are properly notified. However, these inspections must occur at reasonable times and frequencies. It could be considered harassment if a landlord visits your home every few days for "inspections."


13. If you're having problems with your landlord, retain an attorney to handle your landlord. Many disgruntled landlords will attempt to "bully" ignorant tenants by claiming that the landlord has ultimate power. However, tenants do have rights that landlords cannot violate. Even though lawyers are expensive, an attorney can protect your rights and ensure that your landlord does not take advantage of you. If money is an issue, there are tenant protection organizations that could help you.

14. Photograph the property before you leave. Take pictures of the rooms, appliances, backyard, and etc. It's important to visually document the condition of the property before you move out. While most landlords aren't spiteful enough to do this, some landlords will deliberately damage their homes and accuse the previous tenants of causing the damage.

15. Try to leave on a good note. If you continue to rent in the future, your potential landlord may want to contact your previous landlord. You don't want to lose a good rental property because your old landlord said something bad about you.

Renting vs. Buying A Home


Ashley LeAnn profile image

Ashley LeAnn 4 months ago

Good article! My fiancé is in the business of property management. One of our biggest frustrations is when tenants don't report repair needs. Tenants tend to wait too long to report water leaks, and by that point, the damage is far most cost intensive than it would have been if they were to report it sooner!

Chatty Chat profile image

Chatty Chat 4 months ago from United States Author

Thank you. Water leaks are nasty.

wellington property management 3 weeks ago

Seems that the institutes offer many courses for students. What is the total fee if someone opts for dual course? You aren’t close to my home anywhere. Please inform if there is any additional branch of your institute.

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