Relocate to North Dakota: What You Need to Know

Updated on December 15, 2016

One of the few states in the entire United States that has not had major problems because of the Great Recession is North Dakota. The unemployment rate is less that half of the national average. There is a giant government surplus. There is opportunity for those who are willing to take a risk. While there is quite a bit of opportunity, there are also some important things that need to be taken into consideration.

Why Relocate to North Dakota?

The North Dakota State Capitol Building, AKA, the Skyscraper on the Prairie
The North Dakota State Capitol Building, AKA, the Skyscraper on the Prairie | Source

There are a number of reasons why people might want to relocate to North Dakota. The main reasons people move anywhere are usually economic. There are many jobs available in North Dakota and some of the states that adjoin it. The Great Plains have generally done much better than the nation on average over the past five years. In fact, North Dakota unemployment has not even touched 5% since 1990. North Dakota unemployment currently sits at about 3%. Just about anyone who wants a job can get a job.

Why is North Dakota in the midst of an economic boom? Two words come to mind: oil and agriculture. Both are products that everyone has a need for. Both are abundant in North Dakota. New drilling techniques have allowed for the exploitation of the Bakken Shale in western North Dakota. Some oil companies are having difficulty keeping up with demand. Industries that serve the growing communities in the oil field are having trouble maintaining an adequate staff. There are reports of truck drivers making close to six-figure salaries and people working at fast food outfits making $12-$15 per hour to start.

Of course, this has led landlords to raise rates, and the infrastructure of the region is stretched to the max. The state is making investments to improve the infrastructure, and some of the oil companies have built "man camps" to alleviate the housing shortage. This is rather common for boom towns.

There are also educational opportunities in North Dakota. North Dakota State University is one of the leading agricultural schools in the nation, and the University of North Dakota has a leading flight school. There are several small state schools spread throughout the state that frequently cost lest than many of the leading private schools in the country.

The people of North Dakota are some of the most friendly in the country. The state also has one of the lowest crime rates in the country. The state is a nice place to raise a family.

Would You Consider Moving to North Dakota?

Would You Consider Moving to North Dakota?

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Things to Consider Before Moving to North Dakota

While there are many things that can endear the State of North Dakota to those looking to move, there are also some parts of life in the state that some people will not like.

There are no big cities in North Dakota. The biggest town in North Dakota is Fargo, which has a population of around 100,000. The capital of Bismarck and Grand Forks both have between 50,000 and 60,000. Some of the amenities that city lovers like will be missed in most of North Dakota. Those who have disdain for urban environments will be quite at home.

There is a housing shortage in towns like Minot and Williston. Developers are working to alleviate this problem, but it will take a little bit of time.

There is quite a bit of wide open space in North Dakota. This can be something that some people enjoy. Others will find the lack of people or civilization for miles along major roads a bit scary. For example, between Grand Forks and Fargo, there are only two exits in a 75-mile stretch that have any major signs of civilization. Be sure to fill up before getting low on gas.

Finally, there is the weather. When most people think of North Dakota, they think of snow and cold. The state has some of the wildest weather in the country. The record temperatures span over 150 degrees. The record high in Grand Forks is 109, and the record low is -42. There are several nights that will drop to -20 or lower each winter. There will also periodically be stretches where the temperature will not get above zero for days. People actually have to plug their cars in if they do not have garages protect their vehicles from freezing up.

The locals say that "30 below keeps the riff-raff out." To a large degree, this is the case, as can be seen above. The summers can be quite hot. The Red River Valley along the eastern border can see temperatures near 100 with high humidity. The western areas of the state can get even hotter, although the humidity is not usually as high. Precipitation is generally quite low, but snow can pile up and last for about six months or longer.

For those who can handle the weather and want a great opportunity, North Dakota can be a great place to live. For those who want to adapt to the community, it is a wonderful place to raise children. There are also jobs. The winter weather can seem to last forever, but it can be worth it.

A
Minot, North Dakota:
Minot, ND, USA

get directions

One of the leading centers of the Bakken Shale boom.

B
University of North Dakota:
University of North Dakota: Indian Studies, 221 Centennial Dr, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA

get directions

C
Williston, North Dakota:
Williston, ND 58801, USA

get directions

One of the towns most stressed by the oil boom.

D
North Dakota State capitol:
North Dakota State Capitol, Bismarck, ND 58501, USA

get directions

North Dakota State Capitol, home of the North Dakota Heritage Center. Free attraction for everyone.

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    • cprice75 profile imageAUTHOR

      cprice75 

      5 years ago from USA

      I might have to do that at some point. The cost of living is way higher in Western North Dakota than the other parts of the state because of the oil boom, so the high salaries might not go quite as far as some might expect.

    • festivalfood profile image

      festivalfood 

      5 years ago from Seattle

      check out the new book on North dakota oil boom

      Northern Utopia - Rebirth of American Dream

    • cprice75 profile imageAUTHOR

      cprice75 

      5 years ago from USA

      I like the state, other than it being away from family and the winters. The people are great, and even the cities are pretty safe places to raise kids. Thanks for visiting.

    • kellylipp profile image

      Kelly Lipp 

      5 years ago from North Dakota

      I've been living in ND for more than 20 years. You've done a great job summing up the state and the current situation. There are a lot of new businesses building and we are growing larger every day. Nobody used to want to move here, but that is slowly changing. We are getting more and more out of staters in. There are pros and cons to this. Great hub!

    • cprice75 profile imageAUTHOR

      cprice75 

      6 years ago from USA

      It has been home to me for the past two years. I've been in school and we like it quite a bit. The winter weather two years ago was quite bad. Last year was not all that bad. I've had worse when I lived in WV.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 

      6 years ago

      CPrice, my hubby interviewed for a job in Fargo about nine years ago. It was a relief that he didn't get the job for me. I know it is home to many people, but I just couldn't imagine living in such a wide-space land and having to deal with the snow and cold. Thanks for sharing.

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