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Clickworker Review: Why I Deleted My Profile After 1 Day

Updated on May 20, 2017
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Paola Bassanese is an author and freelance writer. She is interested in healthy living, work/life balance, and the performing arts.

Screenshot from Clickworker promo video
Screenshot from Clickworker promo video | Source

Clickworker Company Profile

Clickworker Gmbh is a German company founded in 2005 and based in Essen specialising in offering Internet data services such as filling surveys and entering data.

Work advertised through the Clickworker portal includes surveys, cataloguing pictures, editing, translations and research.

Clickworker is a private company therefore limited information is available in the public domain (see Bloomberg's profile).

You can find a short company profile on Clickworker's About Us page which summarises the key events on its timeline. As a brand, Clickworker was launched in 2011 with a user base of 150,000 Clickworkers. According to the website, as of 2014 the company profiles 700,000 Clickworkers.

The Problem with Microworking

As an employer, it makes sense to outsource simple tasks to microworking service providers like Clickworker: they are cost/effective and have a low risk profile.

However, as a remote worker, you should consider very carefully if you should invest your time into working for a few pennies/cents per task. The risk profile for workers is quite high, as the rejection rate of completed tasks can range from 20 to 50%.

Crowdsourcing and Microworking

Crowdsourcing - screenshot from Clickworker
Crowdsourcing - screenshot from Clickworker | Source

My One-Day Work Experience with Clickworker

All new users have to undergo two online assessments before they are allowed to work, to ensure high quality workers are selected.

While this is very understandable from an employer's point of you, as a worker it raises expectations on the quality of projects that will be on offer.

I decided to join Clickworker because I was seeking paid writing work: related jobs advertised on Clickworker are defined as “text creation” and “editing”.

The assessment tests can vary, but in my case I had to pass two tests: the first test comprised 72 timed multiple-choice questions and the second assessment was a writing test consisting of an original review of a movie, the required length of which being between 90 and 120 words.

I wrote about the movie Hungry Hearts, which I had watched and enjoyed because of its original subject matter (if you would like to find out more you can read the full review of this movie that is featured on my website). The movie review assessment in itself received a 100% score for originality, quality, composition and structure.

The multiple-choice assessment received a score of 95% and you require a score of at least 90% to be allowed to work with Clickworker.

As you can imagine, just the sheer effort of jumping through these hoops can give you a slight sense of achievement and raises your expectations of the projects you will be involved in while working with Clickworker.

Clickworker Is a Victim of Its Own Success

Why is Clickworker a victim of its own success? As a company it has played a very strategic game in the remote working industry and microworking industry and has grown its brand to become one of the most known names in crowdsourcing.

Because of the laws of supply and demand, this situation has created an oversupply of labour – if you consider that there are more than half a million registered workers on the website – and the availability of projects is scarce.

Crowdsourcing on Clickworker

You Are Constantly Refreshing Your Screen to Look for Projects

The instructions are to log on to the site (after you have completed your assessments) and check on your dashboard for available jobs. The instructions also mention that you may need to refresh your screen to see upcoming jobs.

The reality is that you are likely to spend more time refreshing your screen than doing actual work.

When you do get a project, you need to follow some brief and not detailed instructions and each task is timed and evaluated for quality. If you spend too much time on your task you won't get paid the 0.001 or 00.4 eurocents allocated per task (other amounts may be available), and same applies if what you enter is incorrect.

Unfortunately you are not given any feedback therefore, after a few erroneous entries, the project you were working on is taken away from you and money may be deducted from your total.

In my case, after an initial project ranking website results, which I completed within 10-15 minutes, there was nothing else to do. After refreshing a few times and logging back on the site on several occasions, the only other project available was to put clothing pictures into the correct category.

The instructions mentioned that you could include the same item in more than one category, however you were not given any feedback on whether your answer was right or wrong.

After an hour of cataloguing pictures I received a notification saying I had been making too many cataloguing errors and therefore I was no longer allowed to work on that project. 20 eurocent were deducted so in my one day of working with Clickworker I had earned the astronomical sum of 80 eurocent, which I am not allowed to withdraw because you need to reach a 5 euro threshold before you can.

I am writing off this experience as a learning opportunity.

The Verdict

Should you work with Clickworker? It's entirely up to you: you decide how much value you want to put on your time.

To me, my time is extremely valuable. The thought of earning approximately 1 euro per hour, considering I have a Master's degree, is not acceptable. The only reason why I wanted to experiment using Clickworker was to take on some extra writing work, but in my view my own time is better spent elsewhere.

You can make your own mind about this company by checking the existing online reviews on several websites.

If you had a positive experience working with a crowdsourcing company please add the details in the comments. I am also interested in hearing about your experience with Clickworker and if you have come across the same issues.

Do you speak more than one language? You could try working with Unbabel - see my review.

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    • paolaenergya profile image
      Author

      Paola Bassanese 24 months ago from London

      Thanks - I've taken one for the team! Ha ha ha!

    • AMFredenburg profile image

      Aldene Fredenburg 24 months ago from Southwestern New Hampshire

      A valuable piece of info! You may save some people a lot of wasted effort.

    • paolaenergya profile image
      Author

      Paola Bassanese 24 months ago from London

      Hi Georgia, thank you so much for your comment. I totally agree with you! Because "we are worth it!"

    • georgialgal1984 profile image

      Mrs Clark 24 months ago from United States

      Never heard of this site, but now know it would not be something worth my time. I wouldn't like wasting my time refreshing the screen over and over again, hoping I could land a low paying job that may or may not pay me. Thank you for your detailed review and I hope you have a great day~ :)