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How to Work at Home Doing Transcription

Updated on December 23, 2016

What is transcription?

Transcription is probably one of the easiest work-at-home gigs to get into. It involves typing out spoken material from an audio file. The audio content can be a variety of things such as a formal or informal interview, focus group, or lecture, and is frequently interesting. Finished transcripts will have strict formatting requirements and your source audio may not be the best quality. Often, speakers mumble, talk over each other, or have difficult to follow accents. The work is both challenging and rewarding.

Medical, legal, and translation transcription are specialized areas that require more experience or additional education. Medical transcribing includes doctor-patient conversations for patient records and requires training due to the medical terminology. Legal transcribing involves courtroom hearings, conversations between lawyers and clients, and other related content where a legal background will help you immensely. Translating, of course requires mastery of more than one language.

How much does it pay?

The hourly pay rate for transcribing audio varies depending on how fast you can put out quality work. Web sites frequently pay $10 to $20 per audio hour. So, if it takes you three hours to transcribe one hour of audio, you’re looking at only $3 to $6 per working hour. And believe me, you will be slow at first.

How quickly you can turn out work will depend less on your typing speed and more on your grammar skills, ability to format text efficiently, and familiarity with company style guides. The less you need to look up rules, the faster you will be. It’s really a matter of practice. Don’t expect to pull in $1,000 in just four weeks! Once you are approved on a Web site, a reasonable goal in your first month is $50, with an average $250 being the norm for those looking to supplement existing income. With dedication, your skills will improve and you can make a respectable $1,000 each month. The more time you can put into it, the more you’ll make.

How do I get started?

This is an online work-from-home job that requires a high-speed internet connection and a PC with audio capability. It’s not demanding in terms of hardware, so even those with older machines will do fine. Transcription really doesn’t have any fancy requirements to get going.

If you don’t already have a good typing speed, get it up to at least 55 WPM. Most sites recommend transcription applicants be at 70 WPM, but you can start working sooner. The sites care less about your speed. So long as you meet the assignment deadline, they’re still only paying you based on the audio itself. A slower typing speed doesn’t affect them much, but has a direct impact on your personal profitability. It is in your best interest to improve as a typist, but don’t let it stop you from getting started now!

Some transcription companies have built-in audio players, but most do not. You can use whatever player came on your PC when first starting out. Keep in mind, you will be starting and stopping audio as you type to catch up with the speaker. It helps to have software that allows you to adjust playback speed as well, but you can get by without for a little while. ExpressScribe has a free version of their software you can download that lets you type your transcript right in their app and has keyboard shortcuts for playback options. There’s no reason not to download it right away.

It will be helpful to bookmark a few grammar sites in advance for both Chicago Manual of Style and Associated Press Stylebook. Companies will use these for general formatting rules, in addition to their own style guide. Their guide will let you know which is the preferred format. If you encounter something that is not covered in their company guide, you will need to refer to one of these.

Now, get ready for your assessments!

What do I need to know about assessments?

Each transcription company you apply to will require a skill assessment, and you should apply to several. Tests can include a question and answer portion that will help assess your grammar skills, but all will include actual audio files to transcribe. Make sure you download AND READ THOROUGHLY the company style guide you are provided with. This 15 to 30 page document will differ between each Web site, so it’s easiest to do one application per day to help keep your rules straight. There is very little room for error in these tests as the number of applicants is enormous, so take your time!

Some audio files will only be 30 seconds in length, while others might be as long as 10 minutes. Most sites require you to transcribe three separate audio files for an accurate sampling of your work. Some even give you practice files. If this is your first time transcribing, you will feel discouraged by how long it takes you to transcribe only 10 minutes of audio. Don’t worry, you will improve. Take your time. Because of the number of applicants, most sites won’t let you attempt the same test again for six months. Failure essentially bars you from working with that particular company for half a year, limiting your income capabilities.

Transcribe your work somewhere you can save it. Do not type your audio transcriptions for your testing directly into a browser. If your computer freezes, you will lose your work and have to start your transcription again from scratch. Notepad is fine for testing. Save your work frequently, and paste it into the browser when you are finished to submit it.

Companies will give you a pass/fail response immediately. Should you pass, you will have your account activated and be able to start working within the week.

That’s it! You can get started transcribing now!

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