What I've Learned About Being My Own Boss

Updated on April 3, 2018

The Beginning

When I was about 16-years-old, I started my YouTube channel. I was always obsessed with making home videos for family members so this was exciting. I didn't start my channel for money. I was doing it because it's fun and it's something I genuinely loved to do. My first video was called, "Living With A Disability." I posted it for educational purposes but a few weeks later, I noticed it had hundreds of views which turned into a thousand. Soon, I got an email from YouTube telling me I can become a partner and get paid by monetizing my videos. This made me realize I can actually make a job out of this!

My biggest regret was not remaining consistent with my uploads. I was still in high school, so I pretty much just let my channel sit there while I focused on school. Don't get me wrong, that's not a bad thing but I actually did have time to record and post. I just got lazy with it. My thought process was, "I can make this into a job!" But I didn't treat it like one.

A couple of years later, I realized the problem and started posting again. I even bought a nicer camera so my videos would be of nicer quality. I created a schedule for myself and started posting every week. I went from 20 subscribers to 200.

Where I'm At Now

Today, I am still working on my YouTube channel. After taking another break for personal reasons, I'm back at posting every week and working super hard to remain consistent.

Another thing that I've been working on is my photography. Besides selfies, I've loved taking pictures ever since I could get my hands on a camera. When I was six, I begged my mom to let me have my sisters old phone just so I could use the camera on it. Now I have a high-quality camera that I'm not just using to record YouTube videos.

I even started a blog that I'm currently working on getting published soon. I have been writing articles and blog posts for other people which I love doing, but having a blog of my own is something I've wanted for awhile and I'm so excited about it. I am a pretty creative person so having multiple outlets to let my creativity and art shine through is a dream come true.

What I've Learned

There are many things that I've learned from freelancing and being my own boss ever since posting my first YouTube video when I was 16.

  1. Treat whatever you're doing as a job but don't lose sight of your passion for it. If you're suddenly dreading what you used to love, you may need to take a step back and find your passion again.
  2. Consistency! It is so easy to say, "I think I'll record the video tomorrow" or "I'll write the post later." If you're a procrastinator like me, tomorrow will turn into next week and suddenly you're stressed because you were supposed to post the video days ago. Don't procrastinate, just get it done.
  3. Don't doubt yourself. If you keep telling yourself that you're not cut out for it or that you just can't do it, you're simply not going to succeed. To quote the little engine that could, "I think I can, I think I can!"
  4. If you want something bad enough, nothing can stop you.

How You Can Be Successful

If you're currently a freelancer or dancing around the idea of becoming one, you might always be looking for extra tips and tricks to be successful. From working on multiple freelancing projects over the past couple of years, here are my top three tips that I am confident that can help you in your freelancing career.

1) Create a weekly plan of what you need to accomplish that week. Every Sunday, I grab my planner and write down everything that I want to get done each day of the week. For example, if you're a freelance blogger like me, you should strive to publish at least one or two posts a week. Personally, I dedicate every Monday and Wednesday to post on my lifestyle blog, Tuesday and Thursday to record and upload my YouTube videos, and the weekends to work on my photography.

2) Even if you work from home, don't always stay home. Earlier in this post, I mentioned how I started losing motivation and slacking on my freelance work. The reason behind this is sitting in the same spot every day is boring and can also be pretty unhealthy if you hardly find yourself away from your desk at home. Stretch those legs, get that motivation flowing, and do your work somewhere like a local coffee shop if possible.

3) Don't strain your brain! Taking a step back from work can be extremely beneficial to not only you but the quality of your work. If you're a workaholic and find yourself not doing the best work that you know you're capable of, it's probably because you're brain is tired. Go take a walk (leave that computer at home), relax and get plenty of sleep!

© 2018 Amanda Burnett

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