The Art of Making Money Blogging Demystified

Updated on November 4, 2017

Is Blogging Like Publishing a Book...Or Something More?

Blogging is a lot like getting a book self-published. But instead of having to hunt around for a publisher, and then hope for a letter of acceptance from a publisher after 10 rejections, a blogger has several ways of getting exposure.

Because in order to be a professional blogger, your website has to be getting traffic, yes? How do we acquire that traffic?

Some people take out PPC campaigns…this stands for “pay per click” Apparently if they take some ad time to get some exposure it means exactly that, pay per click (when other people visit your website, I suppose) But this is something not always recommended because people can lose a lot of money if they don’t know what they’re doing.

The Natural – and Best- Way of Gaining Traffic: Learning SEO

SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization. No it is not some weird mysterious science. Professional marketers are well aware of its importance because mastery of it is how they gain traffic and visitors to their website which is the only way they will end up gaining all the other good stuff, like commissions, $$$ etc.

Rule no One: You have to know how to rank well in search engines, by using keywords in your articles, that represent what people are seeking to find answers or info on.

It’s important to remember that some keywords are more competitive than others…this means when a keyword is competitive there are lots and lots’ of websites already ranking for that keyword.

Do Some Keywords Have More Value Than Others? Which Should You Go For?

I have been taught that you should not avoid competitive niches (if that’s where your heart is at) BUT however, you need to support your article writing with less competitive keywords. It is called the “backdoor approach”

You can’t always guess about a keyword’s competitiveness, but one clue is its broadness. A broad keyword is usually short, like one or two words.

“Graphic arts” would be a competitive keyword, being short, general, and broad. Because there are many many topics you can pull out of it, like “learning Photoshop”: “using Corel Draw” “what are pixels” “what is vector art” etc.,

I did have a few articles on my site that discuss graphic art topics, but what I do is take the broad term and break it down into a more narrow subtopic. Here are some examples of what I’m getting at here:

“Best computer to learn graphic design?”

“Best graphic design software for beginners”

“What is the difference between lossy and lossless compression”

The above three phrases are what marketers call “long tail keywords” These are keywords that are more like a phrase than one or two words, usually at least four, that describe a very specific, narrow topic.

Always Go For Those "Long Tails" Whenever Possible!

The above three phrases are what marketers call “long tail keywords” These are keywords that are more like a phrase than one or two words, usually at least four, that describe a very specific, narrow topic. Long tail keywords like the examples above are easier to rank for.

True they do not get thousands of searches like short broad keywords do, but their use will get you ranked more quickly and more ease, and you will be able to target an audience looking specifically for your guidance on that subtopic and more likely to purchase said product you are recommending to them.

Experienced affiliate marketers always tell us that it is important not to stress that a long-tail phrase does not get as much traffic because you will rank for many many more keywords than just that one particular. In other words if you obsess on one keyword too much you’re not seeing the forest for the trees.

Don't Forget, A Keyword's Context Is Important Too!

I’ve also learned that you have to be able to read into keyword data results well too. Sometimes, I’ll put into the keyword analysis tool, “graphic design programs” because I’m wanting to look up about software programs, but I end up getting words that represent education terms instead.

Words returned to me like :

“Graphic design degree programs” and “bachelors graphic design programs”

So I am thinking, uh uh, no, I am interested in software, like Illustrator and Corel Draw. That means I change my search terminology to something like “Graphic design software”

Try To Avoid Brand Name Keywords Whenever Possible (And One Exception)

Try not to include brand names in your keywords you use. For example, I wrote a review on my website about a particular graphic design tablet .I was advised by members of my Facebook group to reconsider because the “big dogs” (meaning retailers like Walmart or Best Buy) are ranking on the best spots. I was told to try a different angle, like “best graphic drawing tablets to learn by” or some such, because the big-name retailers aren’t dominating them as much.

It was not that difficult as I was able to use my experience with this particular tablet to support the topic of why these are the best graphic drawing tablets for X demographic.

Case in point; it would be difficult to rank well if I were to write a post with Corel Draw, and its respective version as Corel’s website is going to come in first.

However, people are sometimes looking for reviews of certain products before they buy, so they can get the full scoop before hand. It is easier to rank for (insert brand name and product) review” as it will target specifically people who want to know all they can about that product before they buy it.

My post “My Honest Corel Draw X5 Review” took this angle – targeting a specific group of visitors.It also has made it to page 1 too!

“Content is King” But the King Has a Queen and her name is SEO!

It is very important to write quality content as these days gaming the system with black-hat tricks, link schemes and “scraped” content is over. But always remember that while you write for your readers, you optimize for the search engines.

How do I optimize my posts? I make sure to use the search phrases mentioned earlier i.e. “Best graphic drawing tablets for beginners” in my article title, in one of my subtitles or subheadings, the URl after the dot com, and finally when I name the images I use in my articles.

Images are important too as they support your article topic and they need to be optimized as well to help you get found by visitors. People also tend to have short attention spans and good images help break up the monotony of reading an article.


Conclusion

If you take the time to learn SEO as I describe here you can get found in search engines for FREE! And naturally, which is much better than spending money on “pay per click” campaigns.

Well, I hope I have helped shed some light on this subject for readers who want to know all about what goes into blogging, but don't know who to ask. Who knows, maybe you'll find yourself taking up blogging too!

So I hope this essay will begin to demystify people as to how do bloggers get “published” and found, which is the important step before getting traffic and sales.

Learning About Blogging

Have You Ever Wanted To Learn Bloggng?

See results

© 2017 Jennifer Morris Fouts

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Jevannel profile image

      Jevannel 

      8 months ago from Davao City

      This is a very helpful articles. Thanks for writing.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, toughnickel.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://toughnickel.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)